Tag Archives: Ernest Hemingway

Quotation: “I saw a creature, naked, bestial, Who, squatting upon the ground, Held his heart in his hands, And ate of it.” – Stephen Crane (1871-1900)


Quotation of the Day

I saw a creature, naked, bestial,
Who, squatting upon the ground,
Held his heart in his hands,
And ate of it.”Stephen Crane (1871-1900) Discuss

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

 

Formal portrait of Stephen Crane taken in Washington, D.C., about March 1896

Stephen Crane (November 1, 1871 – June 5, 1900) was an American author. Prolific throughout his short life, he wrote notable works in the Realist tradition as well as early examples of American Naturalism and Impressionism. He is recognized by modern critics as one of the most innovative writers of his generation.

The eighth surviving child of Protestant Methodist parents, Crane began writing at the age of four and had published several articles by the age of 16. Having little interest in university studies, he left college in 1891 to work as a reporter and writer. Crane’s first novel was the 1893 Bowery tale Maggie: A Girl of the Streets, generally considered by critics to be the first work of American literary Naturalism. He won international acclaim in 1895 for his Civil War novel The Red Badge of Courage, which he wrote without having any battle experience.

In 1896, Crane endured a highly publicized scandal after appearing as a witness in the trial of a suspected prostitute, an acquaintance named Dora Clark. Late that year he accepted an offer to travel to Cuba as a war correspondent. As he waited in Jacksonville, Florida, for passage, he met Cora Taylor, the madam of a brothel, with whom he began a lasting relationship. En route to Cuba, Crane’s ship sank off the coast of Florida, leaving him and others adrift for several days in a dinghy. Crane described the ordeal in “The Open Boat“. During the final years of his life, he covered conflicts in Greece (accompanied by Cora, recognized as the first woman war correspondent) and later lived in England with her. He was befriended by writers such as Joseph Conrad and H. G. Wells. Plagued by financial difficulties and ill health, Crane died of tuberculosis in a Black Forest sanatorium in Germany at the age of 28.

At the time of his death, Crane was considered an important figure in American literature. After he was nearly forgotten for two decades, critics revived interest in his life and work. Crane’s writing is characterized by vivid intensity, distinctive dialects, and irony. Common themes involve fear, spiritual crises and social isolation. Although recognized primarily for The Red Badge of Courage, which has become an American classic, Crane is also known for his poetry, journalism, and short stories such as “The Open Boat”, “The Blue Hotel“, “The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky“, and The Monster. His writing made a deep impression on 20th-century writers, most prominent among them Ernest Hemingway, and is thought to have inspired the Modernists and the Imagists.

Crane’s gravestone in Evergreen Cemetery

 

Battle of Chancellorsville by Kurz and Allison; Crane’s realistic portrayal of war has earned him recognition from numerous critics and scholars throughout the years

 

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quotation: A pure hand needs no glove to cover it. Nathaniel Hawthorne


A pure hand needs no glove to cover it.

Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864) Discuss

The Running of the Bulls in Pamplona


The Running of the Bulls in Pamplona

The festival of San Fermin is a deeply rooted celebration held annually, from July 6 to July 14, in the city of Pamplona, Spain. It commemorates San Fermin, who was allegedly dragged to his death by bulls. The festival’s most famous event is the encierro, the running of the bulls, which involves many residents and visitors running in front of bulls down a stretch of narrow streets. Hundreds of people are injured during the encierro each year. How many people have been killed? More… Discuss

today’s holiday: San Fermin Festival


San Fermin Festival

The festivities surrounding this well-known festival in Pamplona, Spain, honoring the city’s bishop, begin with a rocket fired from the balcony of the town hall. Bands of txistularis—with dancers, drummers, and txistu players (a musical instrument like a flute)—march through the town playing songs announcing the “running of the bulls,” an event that has taken place here for 400 years. Each morning, young men, dressed in typical Basque costumes, risk their lives running through the streets ahead of the bulls being run to the bullring where the bullfights will be held. More… Discuss

we’re blessed, poetic thought by George-B (©Always) (the smudge and other poems)


we’re blessed, poetic thought by George-B (©Always)

The snow is melting on Kilimanjaro,
The snow is melting everywhere else
The water levels are rising, and they will continue to
Water cannot escape the earth, the air is captive:
We are lucky that way…
we’re blessed.

THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: USS LAFAYETTE, FORMERLY SS NORMANDIE, BURNS (1942)


USS Lafayette, Formerly SS Normandie, Burns (1942)

The luxuriously appointed SS Normandie was the fastest ocean liner of her day and carried such distinguished passengers as Ernest Hemingway, Fred Astaire, and the von Trapps before a twist of fate brought that to an end. When World War II began, the French vessel was docked in New York. The US seized her for use as a troop transport, but a fire broke out on the renamed USS Lafayette during the refit, causing her to capsize. Who claimed to have sabotaged the ship? More… Discuss

 

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Today’s Birthday: SHERWOOD ANDERSON (1876)


Sherwood Anderson (1876)

After serving briefly in the Spanish-American War, Anderson became a successful advertising man and then manager of a paint factory before suffering a nervous breakdown. Dissatisfied with his life, he abandoned both his family and his job to devote himself to writing. His best-known work is the short story collection Winesburg, Ohio, and his prose style, based on everyday speech, influenced writers Ernest Hemingway and William Faulkner. He died after accidentally swallowing what object? More… Discuss

 

Today’s Birthday: MAXWELL PERKINS (1884)


 

Maxwell Perkins (1884)

After joining the publishing firm of Charles Scribner’s Sons, Perkins became an enormously well-regarded editor with a genius for recognizing and fostering new talent. Though best known for the intensive editorial work that shaped Thomas Wolfe‘s sprawling manuscripts into publishable form, he also edited and published early works by then-unknown writers such as F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, and Erskine Caldwell. How many words did Perkins persuade Wolfe to cut from his first novel? More… Discuss

 

Today’s Quotation: Sherwood Anderson – On finding the object of love


 

I am a lover and have not found my thing to love.

Sherwood Anderson (1876-1941) Discuss


My take on this: If we were to love just one thing, more than anything else in the world…we would become it; I would not like being the ocean, but the sailboat, slashing the surface of its waters. Or the wind, or the bird resting in its migration for a while on my boat’s mast, or the , or the Moon…While restrict myself to loving just one thing? Why reject so many others, why classify, why rank…love life – love all.