Tag Archives: executive order

this day in the yesteryear: The Panic of 1837 (1837)


The Panic of 1837 (1837)

In 1836, US President Andrew Jackson issued the Specie Circular, an executive order requiring purchases of government land to be made only with gold and silver currency, or specie. A shortage of specie soon made loans harder to acquire, and the US economy suffered. When the speculative bubble burst in 1837, every bank in New York City stopped payment in specie. The Panic was followed by a nationwide depression involving record bank failures and unemployment levels. Who was blamed for the Panic? More… Discuss

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Colinde de Craciun -Madrigal Bucharest choir – Three kings – Romanian Carol: great compositions/performances


Colinde de Craciun -Madrigal Bucharest choir – Three kings – Romanian Carol

Today’s Holiday: Bill of Rights Day (2014)


Today’s Holiday

Bill of Rights Day (2014)

The first 10 amendments to the US Constitution of 1787—referred to collectively as the Bill of Rights—were ratified on December 15, 1791. This landmark document protected American citizens from specific abuses by their government and guaranteed such basic rights as the freedom of religion, freedom of speech, and freedom of the press. In 1941, President Franklin D. Roosevelt designated December 15 as Bill of Rights Day and called upon Americans to observe it with appropriate patriotic ceremonies. More… Discuss

quotation: A well adjusted person is one who makes the same mistake twice without getting nervous. Alexander Hamilton


A well adjusted person is one who makes the same mistake twice without getting nervous.

Alexander Hamilton (1755-1804) Discuss

this pressed: This is how former President Jimmy Carter responded to John McCain’s criticism|— msnbc (@msnbc) November 21, 2014


This Day in History: US President Franklin D. Roosevelt Forbids Hoarding of Gold (1933)


US President Franklin D. Roosevelt Forbids Hoarding of Gold (1933)

Executive Order 6012 required US citizens and businesses to turn in all but a small amount of gold to the Federal Reserve in exchange for $20.67 per ounce. It came in the midst of a banking crisis, when the stability of paper currency was in doubt. Consequently, many tried to withdraw their money and redeem it for gold, which was considered safer. However, there simply was not enough gold in the US—or the world—to cover the nation’s debts. How many people were prosecuted for violating the order? More… Discuss