Tag Archives: Family

this day in the yesteryear: Sharon Tate Murdered by Manson “Family” (1969)


Sharon Tate Murdered by Manson “Family” (1969)

Tate, an American actress, was nominated for a Golden Globe award in 1968 for her performance in Valley of the Dolls. In 1969, Charles Manson, leader of a cult called the “Family,” sent his followers to Tate’s home with orders to “totally destroy everyone in [it], as gruesome as you can.” Tate, 8 ½ months pregnant at the time, was murdered along with 5 friends. The “Family” committed several other murders before its members were caught and brought to trial in 1971. Who was Tate’s husband? More… Discuss

Advertisements

today’s holiday: Umoja Karamu


Umoja Karamu

The African-American holiday of Umoja Karamu, which means “unity feast” in Kiswahili, celebrates family members’ commitment to one another. Five periods of African-American life, each symbolized by a color, provide the framework for the ceremony: the family in Africa, before slavery in America (black); the enslaved family in America (white); the family freed from slavery (red); the family struggling for true liberation (green); and the family anticipating the future (orange or gold). Narratives, music, and foods relating to each period are part of the ceremony. More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Manson Family Member Attempts Assassination of US President (1975)


Manson Family Member Attempts Assassination of US President (1975)

In 1967, depressed teen runaway Lynette “Squeaky” Fromme met cult leader Charles Manson, and she soon became a devoted member of his “Family.” In the early 1970s, she was arrested in conjunction with several murders committed by the “Family” but avoided charges. Several years later she was arrested again, this time for aiming a gun at US President Gerald Ford at an appearance in California in what was believed to be an assassination attempt. What did Fromme claim she wanted to discuss with Ford? More… Discuss

this pressed from Globe Health + Advisor: Pumped-up or stripped-down: Which is the best shoe for running? – The Globe and Mail


Pumped-up or stripped-down: Which is the best shoe for running? – The Globe and Mail.

quotation: Mark Twain


A man’s house burns down. The smoking wreckage represents only a ruined home that was dear through years of use and pleasant associations. By and by, as the days and weeks go on, first he misses this, then that, then the other thing. And when he casts about for it he finds that it was in that house. Always it is an essential–there was but one of its kind. It cannot be replaced. It was in that house. It is irrevocably lost… It will be years before the tale of lost essentials is complete, and not till then can he truly know the magnitude of his disaster.  

Mark Twain (1835-1910) Discuss

 

TODAY’S HOILIDAY: National Family Month


National Family Month

National Family Month is observed during the five-week period between Mother’s Day in May and Father’s Day in June. It was started by KidsPeace, a private, not-for-profit organization. The organization believes that such observances provide opportunities for parents, grandparents, and caregivers to be more involved in the lives of the children for whom they are responsible. Families are urged to spend time doing things together during this five-week period, whether it is taking a family vacation or simply doing chores around the house. More… Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

WORD: Materfamilias


materfamilias 

Definition: (noun) A female head of a family or tribe.
Synonyms: matriarch
Usage: As materfamilias, my grandmother calls the shots on holidays like Thanksgiving, and no one dares question her. Discuss.
Enhanced by Zemanta

TODAY’S SAINT: St. Frances of Rome (Feastday: March 9)


Feastday: March 9
1384 – 1440Frances was born in the city of Rome in 1384 to a wealthy, noble family. From her mother she inherited a quiet manner and a pious devotion to God. From her father, however, she inherited a strong will. She decided at eleven that she knew what God wanted for her — she was going to be a nun.

And that’s where her will ran right up against her father’s. He told Frances she was far too young to know her mind — but not too young to be married. He had already promised her in marriage to the son of another wealthy family. In Rome at that time a father’s word was law; a father could even sell his children into slavery or order them killed.

Frances probably felt that’s what he was doing by forcing her to marry. But just as he wouldn’t listen to her, Frances wouldn’t listen to him. She stubbornly prayed to God to prevent the marriage until her confessor pointed out, “Are you crying because you want to do God’s will or because you want God to do your will?”

She gave in to the marriage — reluctantly. It was difficult for people to understand her objection. Her future husband Lorenzo Ponziani was noble, wealthy, a good person and he really cared for her. An ideal match — except for someone who was determined to be a bride of Christ.

Then her nightmare began. This quiet, shy thirteen year old was thrust into the whirl of parties and banquets that accompanied a wedding. Her mother-in-law Cecilia loved to entertain and expected her new daughter-in-law to enjoy the revelry of her social life too. Fasting and scourging were far easier than this torture God now asked her to face.

Frances collapsed from the strain. For months she lay close to death, unable to eat or move or speak.

At her worst, she had a vision of St. Alexis. The son of a noble family, Alexis had run away to beg rather than marry. After years of begging he was so unrecognizable that when he returned home his own father thought he was just another beggar and made him sleep under the stairs. In her own way, Frances must have felt unrecognized by her family — they couldn’t see how she wanted to give up everything for JesusSt. Alexis told her God was giving her an important choice: Did she want to recover or not?

It’s hard for us to understand why a thirteen-year-old would want to die but Frances was miserable. Finally, she whispered, “God’s will is mine.” The hardest words she could have said — but the right words to set her on the road to sanctity.

St. Alexis replied, “Then you will live to glorify His Name.” Her recovery was immediate and complete. Lorenzo became even more devoted to her after this — he was even a little in awe of her because of what she’d been through.

But her problems did not disappear. Her mother-in-law still expected her to entertain and go on visits with her. Look at Frances’ sister-in-law Vannozza –happily going through the rounds of parties, dressing up, playing cards. Why couldn’t Frances be more like Vannozza?

In a house where she lived with her husband, his parents, his brother and his brother’s family, she felt all alone. And that’s why Vannozza found her crying bitterly in the garden one day. When Frances poured out her heart to Vannozza and it turned out that this sister-in-law had wanted to live a life devoted to the Lord too. What Frances had written off as frivolity was just Vannozza’s natural easy-going and joyful manner. They became close friends and worked out a program of devout practices and services to work together.

They decided their obligations to their family came first. For Frances that meant dressing up to her rank, making visits and receiving visits — and most importantly doing it gladly. But the two spiritual friends went to masstogether, visited prisons, served in hospitals and set up a secret chapel in an abandoned tower of their palace where they prayed together.

But it wasn’t fashionable for noblewomen to help the poor and people gossiped about two girls out alone on the streets. Cecilia suffered under the laughter of her friends and yelled at her daughters-in-law to stop theirs spiritual practices. When that didn’t work Cecilia then appealed to her sons, but Lorenzo refused to interfere with Frances’ charity.

The beginning of the fifteenth century brought the birth of her first son, Battista, after John the Baptist. We might expect that the grief of losing her mother-in-law soon after might have been mixed with relief — no more pressure to live in society. But a household as large as the Ponziani’s needed someone to run it. Everyone thought that sixteen-year-old Frances was best qualified to take her mother-in-law’s place. She was thrust even more deeply into society and worldly duties. Her family was right, though — she was an excellent administrator and a fair and pleasant employer.

After two more children were born to her — a boy, Giovanni Evangelista, and a girl, Agnes — a flood brought disease and famine to Rome. Frances gave orders that no one asking for alms would be turned away and she and Vannozza went out to the poor with corn, wine, oil and clothing. Her father-in-law, furious that she was giving away their supplies during a famine, took the keys of the granary and wine cellar away from her.

Then just to make sure she wouldn’t have a chance to give away more, he sold off their extra corn, leaving just enough for the family, and all but one cask of one. The two noblewomen went out to the streets to beg instead.

Finally Frances was so desperate for food to give to the poor she went to the now empty corn loft and sifted through the straw searching for a few leftover kernels of corn. After she left Lorenzo came in and was stunned to find the previously empty granary filled with yellow corn. Frances drew wine out of their one cask until one day her father in law went down and found it empty. Everyone screamed at Frances. After saying a prayer, she led them to cellar, turned the spigot on the empty cask, and out flowed the most wonderful wine. These incidents completely converted Lorenzo and her father-in-law.

Having her husband and father-in-law completely on her side meant she could do what she always wanted. She immediately sold her jewels and clothes and distributed money to needy. She started wearing a dress of coarse green cloth.

Civil war came to Rome — this was a time of popes and antipopes and Rome became a battleground. At one point there were three men claiming to be pope. One of them sent a cruel governor, Count Troja, to conquer Rome. Lorenzo was seriously wounded and his brother was arrested. Troja sent word that Lorenzo’s brother would be executed unless he had Battista, Frances’s son and heir of the family, as a hostage. As long as Troja had Battista he knew the Ponzianis would stop fighting.

When Frances heard this she grabbed Battista by the hand and fled. On the street, she ran into her spiritual adviser Don Andrew who told her she was choosing the wrong way and ordered her to trust God. Slowly she turned around and made her way to Capitol Hill where Count Troja was waiting. As she and Battista walked the streets, crowds of people tried to block her way or grab Battista from her to save him. After giving him up, Frances ran to a church to weep and pray.

As soon as she left, Troja had put Battista on a soldier’s horse — but every horse they tried refused to move. Finally the governor gave in to God’s wishes. Frances was still kneeling before the altar when she felt Battista’s little arms around her.

But the troubles were not over. Frances was left alone against the attackers when she sent Lorenzo out of Rome to avoid capture. Drunken invaders broke into her house, tortured and killed the servants, demolished the palace, literally tore it apart and smashed everything. And this time God did not intervene — Battista was taken to Naples. Yet this kidnapping probably saved Battista’s life because soon a plague hit — a plague that took the lives of many including Frances’ nine-year-old son Evangelista.

At this point, her house in ruins, her husband gone, one son dead, one son a hostage, she could have given up. She looked around, cleared out the wreckage of the house and turned it into a makeshift hospital and a shelter for the homeless.

One year after his death Evangelista came to her in a vision and told her that Agnes was going to die too. In returnGod was granting her a special grace by sending an archangel to be her guardian angel for the rest of her life. She would always been able to see him. A constant companion and spiritual adviser, he once commanded her to stop her severe penances (eating only bread and water and wearing a hair shirt). “You should understand by now,” theangel told her, “that the God who made your body and gave it to your soul as a servant never intended that thespirit should ruin the flesh and return it to him despoiled.”

Finally the wars were over and Battista and her husband returned home. But though her son came back a charming young man her husband returned broken in mind and body. Probably the hardest work of healing Frances had to do in her life was to restore Lorenzo back to his old self.

When Battista married a pretty young woman named Mabilia Frances expected to find someone to share in the management of the household. But Mabilia wanted none of it. She was as opposite of Frances and Frances had been of her mother-in- law. Mabilia wanted to party and ridiculed Frances in public for her shabby green dress, her habits, and her standards. One day in the middle of yelling at her, Mabilia suddenly turned pale and fainted, crying, “Oh my pride, my dreadful pride.” Frances nursed her back to health and healed their differences as well. A converted Mabilia did her best to imitate Frances after that.

With Lorenzo’s support and respect, Frances started a lay order of women attached to the Benedictines called the Oblates of Mary. The women lived in the world but pledged to offer themselves to God and serve the poor. Eventually they bought a house where the widowed members could live in community.

Frances nursed Lorenzo until he died. His last words to her were, “I feel as if my whole life has been one beautiful dream of purest happiness. God has given me so much in your love.” After his death, Frances moved into the house with the other Oblates and was made superior. At 52 she had the life she dreamed of when she was eleven. She had been right in discerning her original vocation — she just had the timing wrong. God had had other plans for her in between.

Frances died four years later. Her last words were “The angel has finished his task — he beckons me to follow him.”

In Her Footsteps:Do you have a spiritual friend who helps you on your journey, someone to pray with and serve with? If you don’t have one now, ask God to send you such a companion. Then look around you. This friend, like Frances’ Vannozza, may be near you already. Try sharing some of your spiritual hopes and desires with those closest to you. You may be surprised at their reaction. (But don’t force your opinions on others or get discouraged by lack of interest. Just keep asking God to lead you.) 

Other Saints for March 9:

Related articles

Enhanced by Zemanta

NEWS: ATTENTIVE OLDER SIBLINGS


Attentive Older Siblings

Studies show that children from larger families score more poorly on tests of IQvocabulary, and other academic indicators than kids from smaller families. Experts attribute this in part to reduced parental attention resulting from the need to divide time and attention among the children. This effect appears to be mitigated in families where older siblings are attuned to their younger siblings’ abilities and interact positively with them. A recent study found that children from large families who had “cognitively sensitive” older siblings performed better on a vocabulary test than those whose siblings were not. More… Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

News: MOTHERS PREDISPOSED TO “BABY” BABY


Mothers Predisposed to “Baby” Baby

Mothers are often criticized for “babying” their youngest child, but we should cut them some slack—they may not be able to help it. Researchers say mothers can estimate the height of their older children with a fair degree of accuracy but consistently underestimate the height of their youngest child by an average of 3 inches (7.5 centimeters). This height illusion could be an adaptive mechanism that makes mothers more likely to nurture and protect what are typically their most vulnerable offspring. More…

 

REGINA SPEKTOR SONG and LYRICS: “CALL THEM BROTHERS”


REGINA SPEKTOR LYRICS

“Call Them Brothers”
(feat. Only Son)

That’s it, it’s split – it won’t recover
Just frame the halves and call them brothers
Find their fathers and their mothers 
If you remember who they are

Over and over they call us their friends
Can’t we find something else to pretend?
Like nobody’s won and we’re safe at the end

In the darkness the film machine’s spinning
So let’s leave it on
We’ll be out in the street 
before anyone knows that we’re gone

That’s it, it’s split, it can’t recover
Just frame the halves and call them a whole
And chip at the bricks and fill up your pockets 
With the pieces of the wall that you stole

The hunt is on, everyone’s chasing
Everyone’s chasing a shot
A shot rings out, nobody wants it
Nobody wants it to stop

That’s it, it’s split, it won’t recover
Just frame the halves and call them brothers
Find your fathers and your mothers
If you remember who they are
If you remember, if you remember,
if you remember who they are

 

 

Leroy Anderson – Forgotten Dreams (“Remember your dreams!”)


FINDING LOVE NO LONGER A MATTER OF RACE OR RELIGION


Finding Love No Longer a Matter of Race or Religion

It may be tempting to stretch the truth in your online dating profile, but if you are in the market for a serious relationship, it might be wise to resist. In a recent poll, singles rated honesty as the most important quality in a mate. And while race and religion were of little concern to most respondents, the same could not be said formustaches on women—female facial hair was a top deal-breaker for 68 percent of the men surveyed—or male body odor—87 percent of women said they would refuse a second date with an odoriferous man. More… Discuss

Fair Weather, By George


Fair Weather, (By George)

 

My dad was the first meteorologist who could do more than just predict the weather. He enjoyed fishing, hobby that he shared with me mostly on summer vacations.

This story is about fair weather, the way he was able to intervene in the complicated business of making an unforgettable sunny day.

 “Dad, do you think it’s going to rain tomorrow, like it did yesterday?” I asked him, concerned about the eventuality of not being able to fulfill our well planned outing. “No, he said”, as if totally sure of the truthfulness of his statement.

“How can you be so sure?”, I asked, since I did not have any knowledge of the science of weather prediction.  “Because I took care of it”, he answered without any hesitation. “You know that hole in the attic’s wall?” he went on saying, “The one facing east?” “Yeah”, I said? “Well, you see, about an hour ago, when you were still asleep, I went up there, in the attic, with one of those  long poles grandma was using to grow the beans  on, and a handful of hay. I wrapped the hay around the tip of the pole, and reach out to the hole in the sky thru which the clouds enter. I waited then for a few minutes, while all the clouds left the sky thru the hole to the West, and quickly I plugged that one too with some hay. So tomorrow, you see, will be sunny, no clouds in the sky what so ever. Will pack our rain coats just as a precaution, but will not have an opportunity to wear them, I promise you.”

I was five years old.  I heard many stories throughout the years about ways to predict the weather, from the circles around the Sun, and the Moon, and the height at which swallows fly  or the way the Sun wink back at us with his last red glowing ray, before it goes to sleep beyond the horizon, the stillness of air, and many more. But this practical way to create a special father-son fishing expedition will always stay with me, treasured and cherished as wisdom of age, wisdom of ages.

Christmas Gifts We Were Blessed to Receive


This slideshow requires JavaScript.


Depress the  following link, to count some of the most wonderful gifts we already possess
Christmas Blessings Are Many And So Are The Gifts You Already Received…