Tag Archives: famous blue raincoat

Watch “Leonard Cohen – Famous Blue Raincoat (Live in Dublin)” on YouTube


It’s four in the morning, the end of December
I’m writing you now just to see if you’re better
New York is cold, but I like where I’m living
There’s music on Clinton Street all through the evening

I hear that you’re building your little house deep in the desert
You’re living for nothing now, I hope you’re keeping some kind of record
Yes, and Jane came by with a lock of your hair
She said that you gave it to her
That night that you planned to go clear
Did you ever go clear?
Ah, the last time we saw you you looked so much older
Your famous blue raincoat was torn at the shoulder
You’d been to the station to meet every train, and
You came home without Lili Marlene
And you treated my woman to a flake of your life
And when she came back she was nobody’s wife
Well I see you there with the rose in your teeth
One more thin gypsy thief
Well, I see Jane’s awake
She sends her regards
And what can I tell you my brother, my killer
What can I possibly say?
I guess that I miss you, I guess I forgive you
I’m glad you stood in my way
If you ever come by here, for Jane or for me
Well, your enemy is sleeping, and his woman is free
Yes, and thanks, for the trouble you took from her eyes
I thought it was there for good so I never tried
And Jane came by with a lock of your hair
She said that you gave it to her
That night that you planned to go clear
Sincerely, L Cohen
Source: LyricFind


Songwriters: Leonard Cohen
Famous Blue Raincoat lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

Joan of Arc – Jennifer Warnes and Leonard Cohen


Eileen’s Videos (Adamfulgence)

The story of Joan of Arc is one of the most wonderful stories in the history of any nation of Europe. In the hour of France’s need, when she was being conquered by English armies, when her forces were so divided by civil war that it seemed as if there were no true Frenchmen, but that every lord and district were for themselves, when she had no recognized king, but only an uncrowned Dauphin…….in this hour of her need there appeared for France a Maiden, a deliverer. 

Joan died a cruel death, but the work which she had begun in France did not die with her. She had united the French and they did not fall apart again into quarrelsome factions. King Charles showed a new spirit as he began his reign. Even through the dangers of war he took time to unite his nobles and keep them in order under him. The English were driven out by this newly roused French nation. The Hundred Years’ War was ended, and a peace was concluded by which France was left free within her own provinces, untroubled by foreigners.

Many movies, books, poems, songs have been written on the subject of Joan of Arc. In this video, the Leonard Cohen song, “Joan of Arc” is featured as sung by Jennifer Warnes with several images that are hopefully interwoven to reflect a variety of Joan of Arc facets in the past and in our present day. I chose to focus on the face of Renée Maria Falconetti from the 1928 movie “La Passion de Jeanne d’Arc” -The director, Dreyer, wrote in his “Thoughts on My Craft”, “Nothing in the world can be compared to the human face. It is a land one can never tire of exploring”. Dreyer’s film was a visionary work of art which has to be seen to be appreciated. But, Falconetti’s performance was so intense for her that she suffered a mental breakdown after the filming.

Songs, poems, symbols are all able to carry multiple messages, depending on who is interpreting them (or when in their life they are doing the interpreting). I have chosen to interpret the fire as being God (Jesus for Joan). Some have said that they saw the fire as the Devil. Not I.

Best viewed at 720p on a full screen.

Now the flames they followed Joan of arc
As she came riding through the dark;
No moon to keep her armour bright,
No man to get her through this very smoky night.
She said, I’m tired of the war,
I want the kind of work I had before,
A wedding dress or something white
To wear upon my swollen appetite.Well, I’m glad to hear you talk this way,
You know I’ve watched you riding every day
And something in me yearns to win
Such a cold and lonesome heroine.
And who are you? she sternly spoke
To the one beneath the smoke.
Why, I’m fire, he replied,
And I love your solitude, I love your pride.Then fire, make your body cold,
I’m going to give you mine to hold,
Saying this she climbed inside
To be his one, to be his only bride.
And deep into his fiery heart
He took the dust of Joan of arc,
And high above the wedding guests
He hung the ashes of her wedding dress.

It was deep into his fiery heart
He took the dust of Joan of arc,
And then she clearly understood
If he was fire, oh then she must be wood.
I saw her wince, I saw her cry,
I saw the glory in her eye.
Myself I long for love and light,
But must it come so cruel, and oh so bright?

 Read more at  Here…
 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
Jennifer Warnes
Birth name Jennifer Jean Warnes
Born March 3, 1947 (age 65)
Origin Anaheim, CaliforniaUnited States
Genres PopCountryRhythm and BluesOpera
Occupations SingerSongwriterArranger,Record producer Concert performer, Television performer
Years active 1967–present (singer, songwriter, arranger and producer)
Labels CISCO, BoxStar Impex Records, Shout Factory
Associated acts Bill MedleyJoe Cocker,Leonard CohenRandy Newman
Website Official website

Jennifer Jean Warnes (born March 3, 1947) is an American singer, songwriter, arranger, and record producer. She is known for her interpretations of compositions written by herself and many others as well as an extensive playlist as a vocalist on movie soundtracks. She is a close friend of and collaborator with Canadian singer-songwriter and poet, Leonard Cohen.

Between 1979 and 1987, Warnes surpassed Frank Sinatra as the vocalist performing the most songs to be nominated for an Academy Award for Best Original Song (four times) and to win an Academy Award for Best Original Song (three times). Her biggest hits include “Up Where We Belong” (a duet with Joe Cocker from the 1982 film, An Officer and a Gentleman) and “(I’ve Had) The Time of My Life” (a duet with Bill Medleyfrom the 1987 film, Dirty Dancing).

Joan Baez-Famous Blue Raincoat


[youtube.com/watch?v=I5uCE8wTlRs]

Joan Baez-Famous Blue Raincoat

Famous Blue Raincoat

It’s four in the morning, the end of December
I’m writing you now just to see if you’re better
New York is cold, but I like where I’m living
There’s music on Clinton Street all through the evening.
I hear that you’re building your little house deep in the desert
You’re living for nothing now, I hope you’re keeping some kind of record. Yes, and Jane came by with a lock of your hair
She said that you gave it to her
That night that you planned to go clear
Did you ever go clear? Ah, the last time we saw you you looked so much older
Your famous blue raincoat was torn at the shoulder
You’d been to the station to meet every train
And you came home without Lili Marlene

And you treated my woman to a flake of your life
And when she came back she was nobody’s wife.

Well I see you there with the rose in your teeth
One more thin gypsy thief
Well I see Jane’s awake —

She sends her regards.

And what can I tell you my brother, my killer
What can I possibly say?
I guess that I miss you, I guess I forgive you
I’m glad you stood in my way.

If you ever come by here, for Jane or for me
Your enemy is sleeping, and his woman is free.

Yes, and thanks, for the trouble you took from her eyes
I thought it was there for good so I never tried.

And Jane came by with a lock of your hair
She said that you gave it to her
That night that you planned to go clear —

Sincerely, L. Cohen

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia“Famous Blue Raincoat” is a song by Leonard Cohen. It is the sixth track on his third album, Songs of Love and Hate, released in 1971. The song is written in the form of a letter (although many of the lines are written in amphibrachs). The lyric tells the story of a love triangle between the speaker, a woman named Jane, and the male addressee, who is identified only briefly as “my brother, my killer.”
The lyrics contain references to the German love song “Lili Marlene,” to Scientology, and to Clinton Street. Cohen lived on Clinton Street in the Lower East Side of Manhattan in the 1970s when it was a lively Latino area.[1]In the 1999 book, The Complete Guide to the Music of Leonard Cohen, the authors comment that Cohen’s question, “Did you ever go clear?”, in the song, is a reference to the Scientology state of “Clear“.[2] Cohen was very briefly a member of the Church of Scientology, which he had heard was a “good place to meet women.” [3][4]

In the liner notes to 1975’s The Best of Leonard Cohen, which includes the song, he mentions that the famous blue raincoat to which he refers actually belonged to him, and not someone else:

I had a good raincoat then, a Burberry I got in London in 1959. Elizabeth thought I looked like a spider in it. That was probably why she wouldn’t go to Greece with me. It hung more heroically when I took out the lining, and achieved glory when the frayed sleeves were repaired with a little leather. Things were clear. I knew how to dress in those days. It was stolen from Marianne’s loft in New York sometime during the early seventies. I wasn’t wearing it very much toward the end.

Ron Cornelius played guitar on Songs of Love and Hate and was Cohen’s band leader for several years. He told Songfacts: “We played that song a lot before it ever went to tape. We knew it was going to be big. We could see what the crowd did – you play the Royal Albert Hall, the crowd goes crazy, and you’re really saying something there. If I had to pick a favorite from the album, it would probably be ‘Famous Blue Raincoat.'” [5]

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Famous Blue Raincoat – Leonard Cohen



Lyrics
Its four in the morning, the end of december
Im writing you now just to see if youre better
New york is cold, but I like where Im living
Theres music on clinton street all through the evening.

I hear that youre building your little house deep in the desert
Youre living for nothing now, I hope youre keeping some kind of record.

Yes, and Jane came by with a lock of your hair
She said that you gave it to her
That night that you planned to go clear
Did you ever go clear?

Ah, the last time we saw you you looked so much older
Your famous blue raincoat was torn at the shoulder
Youd been to the station to meet every train
And you came home without lili marlene

And you treated my woman to a flake of your life
And when she came back she was nobodys wife.

Well I see you there with the rose in your teeth
One more thin gypsy thief
Well I see janes awake —

She sends her regards.
And what can I tell you my brother, my killer
What can I possibly say?
I guess that I miss you, I guess I forgive you
Im glad you stood in my way.

If you ever come by here, for Jane or for me
Your enemy is sleeping, and his woman is free.

Yes, and thanks, for the trouble you took from her eyes
I thought it was there for good so I never tried.

And Jane came by with a lock of your hair
She said that you gave it to her
That night that you planned to go clear

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Leonard Cohen: Anthem (Good morning World)


“Anthem”, by Leonard Cohen

The birds they sang 
at the break of day 
Start again 
I heard them say 
Don’t dwell on what 
has passed away 
or what is yet to be. 
Ah the wars they will 
be fought again 
The holy dove 
She will be caught again 
bought and sold 
and bought again 
the dove is never free. 

Ring the bells that still can ring 
Forget your perfect offering 
There is a crack in everything 
That’s how the light gets in. 

We asked for signs 
the signs were sent: 
the birth betrayed 
the marriage spent 
Yeah the widowhood 
of every government — 
signs for all to see. 

I can’t run no more 
with that lawless crowd 
while the killers in high places 
say their prayers out loud. 
But they’ve summoned, they’ve summoned up 
a thundercloud 
and they’re going to hear from me. 

Ring the bells that still can ring … 

You can add up the parts 
but you won’t have the sum 
You can strike up the march, 
there is no drum 
Every heart, every heart 
to love will come 
but like a refugee. 

Ring the bells that still can ring 
Forget your perfect offering 
There is a crack, a crack in everything 
That’s how the light gets in. 

Ring the bells that still can ring 
Forget your perfect offering 
There is a crack, a crack in everything 
That’s how the light gets in. 
That’s how the light gets in. 
That’s how the light gets in.