Tag Archives: federal reserve

this pressed: Leak at Federal Reserve Revealed Confidential Bond-Buying Details|ProPublica


Excerpts: “Update, Dec. 1, 5:55 p.m.: The Federal Reserve Board declined to respond to detailed questions about this article. The Inspector General also declined to comment. Former Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke referred all questions to the Federal Reserve. Medley Global Advisors did not respond to requests for comment.

The Federal Reserve sprung a previously unreported leak in October 2012, when potentially market-moving information about highly confidential monetary deliberations made its way into a financial analyst‘s private newsletter.

The leak occurred the day before the scheduled public release of meeting minutes that shed new light on the Fed’s decision to embark on a third round of bond buying to boost the economy, ProPublica has learned.

The newsletter revealed what the minutes would say the next day as well as fresh details about the Fed’s internal plans and deliberations – information that could have provided traders with an edge.”   |ProPublica

Leak at Federal Reserve Revealed Confidential Bond-Buying Details

Sen. Warren’s Q&A with Chair Janet L. Yellen (Board of Governers of the Federal Reserve System)


Sen. Warren’s Q&A with Janet Yellen

What Is The Federal Reserve Bank? / Educational Video


What Is The Federal Reserve Bank? / Educational Video

The Federal Budget, Per Person – NYTimes.com


 

The Spider and the Giants

The Spider and the Giants (Photo credit: Thomas Hawk)

 

The Federal Budget, Per Person – NYTimes.com.

 

 

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This Day in History: US President Franklin D. Roosevelt Forbids Hoarding of Gold (1933)


US President Franklin D. Roosevelt Forbids Hoarding of Gold (1933)

Executive Order 6012 required US citizens and businesses to turn in all but a small amount of gold to the Federal Reserve in exchange for $20.67 per ounce. It came in the midst of a banking crisis, when the stability of paper currency was in doubt. Consequently, many tried to withdraw their money and redeem it for gold, which was considered safer. However, there simply was not enough gold in the US—or the world—to cover the nation’s debts. How many people were prosecuted for violating the order? More… Discuss