Tag Archives: felix mendelssohn

make music part of your life series: Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy String Quartet No. 6 in F minor, Op. 80


Advertisements

Historic Musical Bits: , Mendelssohn:, A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Berliner Philharmoniker conductor: Ferenc Fricsay) Rita Streich & Diana Eustrati (1950)


Mendelssohn: A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Ferenc Fricsay) Rita Streich & Diana Eustrati

 

great compositions/performances: Claudio Abbado “Overture “The Fair Melusina” Mendelssohn


Claudio Abbado “Overture “The Fair Melusina” Mendelssohn

Kurt Masur: Felix Mendelssohn / Overture Ruy Blas, op.95 , great compositions/performances


[Kurt Masur] Felix Mendelssohn / Overture Ruy Blasop.95


 


Andre Rieu – The Emperor Waltz (Kaiserwalzer) 2008

Felix Mendelssohn , Rondo brillant in E-flat major, Op.29 (1834)



Published on Jan 16, 2014

Picture: Sir Nathaniel Dance-Holland – The Meeting of Dido and Aeneas

Felix Mendelssohn

Work: Rondo brillant in E-flat major, Op.29 (1834)

Pianist: Benjamin Frith

Orchestra: Slovak State Philharmonic Orchestra

Conductor: Robert Stankovsky

Mendelssohn / String Symphony No. 7 in D minor,Northern Chamber Orchestra, Nicolas Ward, great compositions/performances


Mendelssohn / String Symphony No. 7 in D minor

Historic musical bits, Mozart Violin Concerto N°4 in D major, K218. David Oistrakh, violin, great compositons/performances


Mozart Violin Concerto N°4 in D major, K 218. David Oistrakh, violin )

JOHANNES BRAHMS- Serenade Nº2 A, Op. 16


JOHANNES BRAHMS.- Serenade Nº2 A, Op. 16

Bach – Toccata and Fugue in D minor, BWV 565, great compositions/performances



Mendelssohn’s Octet in E-flat, Opus 20

Veridian String Quartet: Mendelssohn Op. 44 No. 3 , great compositions/performances


Veridian String Quartet: Mendelssohn Op. 44 No. 3

Schumann – Wilhelm Kempff (1972) Waldszenen op 82: great compositions/performances (my favorite interpretation of this marvelous composition)


Schumann – Wilhelm Kempff (1972) Waldszenen op 82

Felix Mendelssohn – Octet in E-flat major, Op. 20, (1964) : great compositions/performances


Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy Piano Trio No 1 D Minor Op. 49: make music part of your life series


Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy Piano Trio No 1 D Minor Op. 49

Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdi – Symphony No. 1 in C minor, Op. 1/Nathalie Stutzmann,: Great compositions/performances


Mendelssohn A Midsummer Night’s Dream Overture Op.21 by Masur, LGO (1997): great compositions/performances


Mendelssohn A Midsummer Night’s Dream Overture Op.21 by Masur, LGO (1997)

Ottorino Respighi Brazilian Impressions (Antal Dorati/LSO): great compositions/performances


Ottorino Respighi Brazilian Impressions (Antal Dorati / London Symphony Orchestra)

Mendelssohn A Midsummer Night’s Dream Overture Op.2, LGO|Masur (1997), Great compositions/performances,


Mendelssohn A Midsummer Night’s Dream Overture Op.21 by Masur, LGO (1997)

Felix Mendelssohn-Piano Concerto No. 1 in G minor, Op. 25: great compositions/performances


Felix Mendelssohn: Piano Concerto No. 1 in G minor,  Op. 25:

  1. Molto allegro con fuoco in G minor
  2. Andante in E major
  3. Presto—Molto allegro e vivace in G major

Felix Mendelssohn: Symphony No.3 – Blomstedt/RCO(2008Live): Great compositions/performances


Mendelssohn: Symphony No.3 – Blomstedt/RCO(2008Live)

Felix Mendelssohn – Piano Concerto in A Minor (13 year old Mendelssohn): make music part of your life series


Felix Mendelssohn – Piano Concerto in A Minor (13 year old Mendelssohn)

Prazak Quartet & Zemlinsky Quartet : Felix Mendelssohn String octet E-flat major Op. 20: great compositions/performances


Prazak Quartet & Zemlinsky Quartet : Felix Mendelssohn String octet E-flat major Op. 20

Robert Schumann: Introduction & Allegro in D minor Op. 134: make music part of your life series


Robert Schumann: Introduction & Allegro in D minor Op. 134

Beethoven: Leonore Overture No. 3, Op. 72, Kurt Masur: great compositions/perform


Beethoven: Leonore Overture No. 3, Op. 72, Kurt Masur

C. Stamitz – Clarinet Concerto Nº3 Bb Major (2. Romanze) – Orquestra de Cambra de Tortosa: MAKE MUSIC PART OF YOUR LIFE SERIES


C. Stamitz – Clarinet Concerto Nº3 Bb Major (2. Romanze) – Orquestra de Cambra de Tortosa

 

Felix Mendelssohn: A Midsummer Night’s Dream Overture Op.21 by Masur, LGO (1997): great compositions/performances


Mendelssohn A Midsummer Night’s Dream Overture Op.21 by Masur, LGO (1997)

lyricpost  lyricpost
Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy:

A Midsummer Night’s Dream Overture Op.21
(Gewandhausorchester Leipzig

Kurt Masur, Conductor)
****************************************             
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

At separate times, Felix Mendelssohn composed music for William Shakespeare‘s play, A Midsummer Night’s Dream. In 1826, near the start of his career, Mendelssohn wrote a concert overture (Op. 21). In 1842, only a few years before his death, he wrote incidental music (Op. 61) for a production of the play, into which he incorporated the existing Overture. The incidental music includes the world-famous Wedding March. The German title reads Ein Sommernachtstraum.

Overture

The Overture in E major, Op. 21, was written by Mendelssohn at 17 years and 6 months old (it was finished on 6 August 1826),[1] and George Grove called it “the greatest marvel of early maturity that the world has ever seen in music”.[2] It was written as a concert overture, not associated with any performance of the play. The Overture was written after Mendelssohn had read a German translation of the play in 1826. The translation was by August Wilhelm Schlegel, with help from Ludwig Tieck. There was a family connection as well: Schlegel’s brother Friedrich married Felix Mendelssohn’s aunt Dorothea.[3]

While a romantic piece in atmosphere, the Overture incorporates many classical elements, being cast in sonata form and shaped by regular phrasings and harmonic transitions. The piece is also noted for its striking instrumental effects, such as the emulation of scampering ‘fairy feet’ at the beginning and the braying of Bottom as an ass (effects which were influenced by the aesthetic ideas and suggestions of Mendelssohn’s friend at the time, Adolf Bernhard Marx). Heinrich Eduard Jacob, in his biography of the composer, said that Mendelssohn had scribbled the chords after hearing an evening breeze rustle the leaves in the garden of the family’s home.[3]

Following the first theme in the parallel relative minor (E minor) representing the dancing fairies, a transition (the royal music of the court of Athens) leads to a second theme, that of the lovers. A final group of themes, suggesting the craftsmen and hunting calls, closes the exposition. The fairies dominate most of the development section and ultimately have the final word in the coda, just as in Shakespeare’s play.

The Overture was premiered in Stettin (then in Prussia; now Szczecin, Poland) on 20 February 1827,[4] at a concert conducted by Carl Loewe. Mendelssohn had turned 18 just over two weeks earlier. He had to travel 80 miles through a raging snowstorm to get to the concert,[5] which was his first public appearance. Loewe and Mendelssohn also appeared as soloists in Mendelssohn’s Concerto in A-flat major for 2 pianos and orchestra, and Mendelssohn alone was the soloist for Carl Maria von Weber‘s Konzertstück in F minor. After the intermission, he joined the first violins for a performance of Beethoven‘s Ninth Symphony.

The first British performance of the Overture was conducted by Mendelssohn himself, on 24 June 1829, at the Argyll Rooms in London, at a concert in benefit of the victims of the floods in Silesia, and played by an orchestra that had been assembled by Mendelssohn’s friend Sir George Smart.[4]

Incidental music

Mendelssohn wrote the incidental music, Op. 61, for A Midsummer Night’s Dream in 1842, 16 years after he wrote the Overture. It was written to a commission from King Frederick William IV of Prussia. Mendelssohn was by now the music director of the King’s Academy of the Arts and of the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra.[6] A successful presentation of SophoclesAntigone on 28 October 1841 at the New Palace in Potsdam, with music by Mendelssohn (Op. 55) led to the King asking him for more such music, to plays he especially enjoyed. A Midsummer Night’s Dream was produced on 14 October 1843, also at Potsdam. The producer was Ludwig Tieck. This was followed by incidental music for Sophocles’ Oedipus (Potsdam, 1 November 1845; published posthumously as Op. 93) and Jean Racine‘s Athalie (Berlin, 1 December 1845; Op. 74).[1]

The A Midsummer Night’s Dream Overture, Op. 21, originally written as an independent piece 16 years earlier, was incorporated into the Op. 61 incidental music as its overture, and the first of its 14 numbers. There are also vocal sections and other purely instrumental movements, including the Scherzo, Nocturne and Wedding March. The vocal numbers include the song “Ye spotted snakes” and the melodramas “Over hill, over dale”, “The Spells”, “What hempen homespuns”, and “The Removal of the Spells”. The melodramas served to enhance Shakespeare’s text.

Mendelssohn / String Symphony No. 2 in D major: make music part of your life series


Mendelssohn / String Symphony No. 2 in D major

 

 

Brahms viola sonata op. 120 no. 2 in E flat major: great compositions/performances



FROM:

Brahms viola sonata op. 120 no. 2 in E flat major

Piano: Daniel Barenboim
Viola: Pinchas Zukerman
Be apart of my Facebook page! http://www.facebook.com/Blop888

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The viola sonata is a sonata for viola, sometimes with other instruments, usually piano. The earliest viola sonatas are difficult to date for a number of reasons:

  • in the Baroque era, there were many works written for the viola da gamba, including sonatas (the most famous being Johann Sebastian Bach‘s three, now most often played on the cello)
  • in the Classical era and early Romantic, there were few works written with viola specifically in mind as solo instrument, and many of these, like those of the Stamitz family, may have been written for the viola d’amore, like most of their viola works – though it is now customary to play them on the viola; it was more typical to publish a work or set, like George Onslow‘s opus 16 cello sonatas, or Johannes Brahms‘s opus 120 clarinet sonatas in the late 19th century, that specified the viola as an alternate. Two early exceptions were the viola sonatas of Felix Mendelssohn (1824, posthumously published around 1981) and the opus 1 sonata of the composer Ernst Naumann (1832-1910), published in 1854.

Mendelssohn Calm Sea and Prosperous Voyage, Opus 27: make music part of your life series


 FROM

FELIX MENDELSSOHN Calm Sea and Prosperous Voyage, Opus 27

The Hanover Band
Conductor: Roy Goodman

F. Mendelssohn-Bartholdy – Suite ‘Ein Sommernachtstraum’ / A Midsummer Night’s Dream Op. 61 (Live): make music part of your life series


from:  thiagoblanco:
F. Mendelssohn-Bartholdy – Suite ‘Ein Sommernachtstraum’ / A Midsummer Night’s Dream Op. 61 (Live)

Suite – “Ein Sommernachtstraum” op. 61 / Suite – A Midsummer Night’s Dream Op. 61 (Live)

– Overture
– Scherzo
– Intermezzo
– Nocturne
Wedding March

Orchestra: WDR Sinfonieorchester Köln
Conductor: Ton Koopman
Composer: Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy (1809 – 1847)

 

 

Mendelssohn – String Quartet No. 1, Op. 12: make music part of your life series


Mendelssohn – String Quartet No. 1, Op. 12

Felix Mendelssohn-Bartoldy

String Quartet No.1, Op.12 (1829)

1. Adagio non troppo – Allegro non tardante
2. Canzonetta – Allegretto (7:42)
3. Andante espressivo (11:48)
4. Molto allegro e vivace (15:23)

Melos Quartet

Editor:
Julius Rietz (1812–1877)

Publisher Info.:
Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdys Werke, Serie 6.
Leipzig: Breitkopf & Härtel, 1875. Plate M.B. 22.

Reprinted:
Mineola: Dover Publications

Rosemary Thomas: Mendelssohn – Song Without Words – Sweet Remembrance Op. 19 No. 1 (make music part of your life series)


Rosemary Thomas: Mendelssohn – Song Without Words – Sweet Remembrance Op. 19 No. 1

 

make music part of your life sereis: Felix Mendelssohn – Piano Concerto in A Minor (13 year old Mendelssohn)


[youtube.com/watch?v=k3ZQ-nWHy_8]

Felix Mendelssohn – Piano Concerto in A Minor (13 year old Mendelssohn)

Jakob Ludwig Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy (German born, and generally known in English-speaking countries, as Felix Mendelssohn (3 February 1809 — 4 November 1847) was a German composer, pianist, organist and conductor of the early Romantic period.

Piano Concerto in A Minor (1822)

1. Allegro
2. Adagio (13:32)
3. Finale: Allegro ma non troppo (22:10)

***Cyprien Katsarsis piano and the Franz Liszt Chamber Orchestra conducted by Janos Rolla

***Paintings and drawings by Felix Mendelssohn (except his images and his wife’s)

Ion Voicu – Felmake music part of your life series: Mendelssohn – Concerto In E minor for Violin and Orchestra, Op. 64


[youtube.com/watch?v=Stc6zJxEf-s]

Ion Voicu – Felix Mendelssohn – Concerto In E minor for Violin and Orchestra, Op. 64

 

make music part of your life series: Felix Bartholdy Mendelssohn – 4 pieces for String Quartet Op. 81 – III. Capriccio


[youtube.com/watch?v=p0JwIUhGtVM]

Felix Bartholdy Mendelssohn – 4 pieces for String Quartet Op. 81 – III. Capriccio  (SHARON QUARTET)

GREAT COMPOSITIONS/PERFORMANCES: Mendelssohn A Midsummer Night’s Dream Overture Op.21 by Masur, LGO (1997)


[youtube.com/watch?v=SUDvZaMl4RU&noredirect=1]

Mendelssohn A Midsummer Night’s Dream Overture Op.21 by Masur, LGO (1997)

Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy:
A Midsummer Night’s Dream Overture Op.21

Gewandhausorchester Leipzig
Kurt Masur, Conductor

Live at Gewandhaus, Leipzig

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

MAKE MUSIC PART OF YOUR LIFE SERIES: Felix Mendelssohn Symphony No 5 D major minor ‘Reformation’ S. Baudo OSI


[youtube.com/watch?v=cbI1HEurX-c]

Felix Mendelssohn Symphony No 5 D major minor ‘Reformation’ S. Baudo OSI

 
watercolour portrait against blank background of a young man with dark, curly hair, facing the spectator: dressed in fashionable clothes of the 1830s, dark jacket with velvet collar, black silk cravat, high collar, white waistcoat

Portrait of Mendelssohn by James Warren Childe, 1839

The Symphony No. 5 in D major/D minor, Op. 107, known as the Reformation, was composed by Felix Mendelssohn in 1830 in honor of the 300th anniversary of the Presentation of the Augsburg Confession. The Confession is a key document of Lutheranism and its Presentation to Emperor Charles V in June 1530 was a momentous event of the Protestant Reformation. This symphony was written for a full orchestra and was Mendelssohn’s second extended symphony. It was not published until 1868, 21 years after the composer’s death – hence its numbering as ‘5’. Although the symphony is not very frequently performed, it is better known today than it was during Mendelssohn’s lifetime.

Key

The key of the symphony is stated as D major on the title page of Mendelssohn’s autograph score. However, only the slow introduction is written in D Major, whereas the main theme and the cadence setting of the first movement are in D minor. The composer himself referred to the symphony on at least one occasion as in D minor.[5]

Instrumentation

The symphony is scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets, 2 bassoons, “serpente” (possibly a serpent[6]) and contrabassoon (fourth movement only, now usually played on the contrabassoon alone), 2 horns, 2 trumpets, 3 trombones, timpani and strings.

Form

The symphony is in four movements:

  1. Andante — Allegro con fuoco
  2. Allegro vivace
  3. Andante
  4. Andante con moto — Allegro maestoso
Enhanced by Zemanta

Great Compositions/Performances: Mendelssohn / Frank Pelleg, 1954: Quartet in B minor for Piano and Strings, Op. 3


[youtube.com/watch?v=dSP9m_FK80o]

Mendelssohn / Frank Pelleg, 1954: Quartet in B minor for Piano and Strings, Op. 3

Frank Pelleg (1910-1968) is joined by Peter Rybar (1913-2002, violin), Heinz Wigand (viola), and Antonio Tusa (cello) — all members of the Winterthur String Quartet — in this 1954 recording of the first movement of the Mendelssohn piano quartet in B minor, Op. 3. I created this video from the LP depicted above, issued on the Concert Hall Society label, serial number E4KP 1420, Concert Hall release H-5.

Movement 1: Allegro molto
Movement 2: Andante
Movement 3: Allegro molto
Movement 4: Finale – Allegro vivace

(Note: Late last year I had uploaded this performance in four separate segments.)

—————————————-­————-
More from Mendelssohn:

Arthur Grumiaux, 1974: Violin Concerto in E minor, Op. 64 – Complete – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LURD7h…

Mendelssohn / Igor Oistrakh: Violin Concerto in E minor, Op. 64 – Movement 1, early 1950s: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Igqdql…
—————————————-­————-

Details about this LP are available at the Library of Congress website here: http://lccn.loc.gov/r54000657

More information about Pelleg here: http://www.doremi.com/pelleg.html

Rybar’s obituary is available for review here:http://www.guardian.co.uk/news/2002/o…

Enhanced by Zemanta

Great Compositions/Performances: “Das Märchen von der schönen Melusine”, Concert Overture in F Major, op 32 by Felix Mendelssohn Gewandhausorchester Leipzig Kurt Masur, conductor


Great Compositions/Performances: Kurt MasurDas Märchen von der schönen Melusine” Mendelssohn
“Das Märchen von der schönen Melusine”, Concert
Overture in F Major, op 32
by Felix Mendelssohn
Gewandhausorchester Leipzig
Kurt Masur, conductor

Enhanced by Zemanta

Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Mendelssohn Cello Sonata no.2 Natalia Gutman & Viacheslav Poprugin



Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy sonata for cello and piano op.58 in D major
1.Allegro assai vivace 0:02
2.Allegretto scherzando 8:48
3.Adagio 13:42
4.Molto allegro e vivace 18:15

Natalia Gutman cello
Viacheslav Poprugin piano

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Beethoven-Piano Concerto No. 4 in G Major Op. 58 (Rudolf Serkin: piano-Philadelphia Orchestra-Eugene Ormandy)



***Beethoven-Piano Concerto No. 4 in G Major Op. 58
***Rudolf Serkin: piano-Philadelphia OrchestraEugene Ormandy: ***conductor-1962

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Ludwig van Beethoven‘s Piano Concerto No. 4 in G major, Op. 58, was composed in 1805–1806, although no autograph copy survives. It is scored for solo piano and an orchestra consisting of a flute, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, two horns, two trumpets, timpani, and strings. Like many classical concertos, it has three movements:

  1. Allegro moderato
  2. Andante con moto (in E minor)
  3. Rondo (Vivace)

Premiere and reception

It was premiered in March 1807 at a private concert of the home of Prince Franz Joseph von Lobkowitz. The Coriolan Overture and the Fourth Symphony were premiered in that same concert.[1] However, the public premiere was not until 22 December 1808 in Vienna at the Theater an der Wien. Beethoven again took the stage as soloist. This was part of a marathon concert which saw Beethoven’s last appearance as a soloist with orchestra, as well as the premieres of the Choral Fantasy and the Fifth and Sixth symphonies. Beethoven dedicated the concerto to his friend, student, and patron, the Archduke Rudolph.

A review in the May 1809 edition of the Allgemeine musikalische Zeitung states that “[this concerto] is the most admirable, singular, artistic and complex Beethoven concerto ever”.[2] However, after its first performance, the piece was neglected until 1836, when it was revived by Felix Mendelssohn. Today, the work is widely performed and recorded, and is considered to be one of the central works of the piano concerto literature.

 

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Felix Mendelssohn – Songs without Words – Op.53, No.1



Felix MendelssohnSongs without Words – Op.53, No.1
András Schiff
Related articles

Enhanced by Zemanta

Encore: Compositions/Performances: Mendelssohn A Midsummer Night’s Dream Overture Op.21 by Masur, LGO (1997)


Great Compositions/Performances:  Mendelssohn A Midsummer Night’s Dream Overture Op.21 by Masur, LGO (1997)
Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy:
A Midsummer Night’s Dream Overture Op.21
Gewandhausorchester Leipzig
Kurt Masur, Conductor
Live at Gewandhaus, Leipzig

visit:  http://www.shakespeare-navigators.com/dream/quotesdream.html
for quotes, like the one bellow,  from Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream

So quick bright things come to confusion.—Lysander again speaks to Hermia of the fragility of happiness. (“Confusion” means darkness and destruction.)

Related articles

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Great Compositions/Performances: Kurt Masur, conducts the Gewandhausorchester Leipzig in Mendelssohn’s ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream Overture Op.21’ (1997)


Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy:
A Midsummer Night’s Dream Overture Op.21

Gewandhausorchester Leipzig
Kurt Masur, Conductor
Live at Gewandhaus, Leipzig
Reupload from Lyricholic’s Channel

Enhanced by Zemanta

Great Composers/Compositions: Robert Schumann Symphony No 3 E flat major Rhenish Rheinische Sinfonie David Zinman Tonhalle Zurich



Robert Schumann Symphony No 3 E flat major Rhenish Rheinische Sinfonie David Zinman Tonhalle Zurich

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Symphony No. 3 “Rhenish” in E flat major, Op. 97 is the last of Robert Schumann‘s (1810-1856) symphonies to be composed, although not the last published. It was composed from November 2 to December 9, 1850, and comprises five movements:

  1. Lebhaft (Lively)
  2. Scherzo: Sehr mäßig (Scherzo) (in C major)
  3. Nicht schnell (not fast) (in A-flat major)
  4. Feierlich (Solemn) (in E-flat minor)
  5. Lebhaft (Lively)

The Third Symphony is scored for two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets in B♭, two bassoons, four french horns in E♭, two trumpets in E♭, threetrombonestimpani and strings. Its premiere on February 6, 1851 in Düsseldorf, conducted by Schumann himself,[1] was received with mixed reviews, “ranging from praise without qualification to bewilderment”. However according to Peter A. Brown, members of the audience applauded between every movement, and especially at the end of the work when the orchestra joined them in congratulating Schumann by shouting “hurrah!”.[2]

Biographical context

Throughout his life, Schumann explored a diversity of musical genres, including chambervocal, and symphonic music. Although Schumann wrote an incomplete G minor symphony as early as 1832-33 (of which the first movement was performed on two occasions to an unenthusiastic reception),[3]he only began seriously composing for the symphonic genre after receiving his wife’s encouragement in 1839.[4] Schumann gained quick success as a symphonic composer following his orchestral debut with his warmly-received First Symphony, which was composed in 1841 and premiered in Leipzig with Felix Mendelssohn conducting. By the end of his career Schumann had composed a total of four symphonies. Also in 1841 he finished the work which was later to be published as his Fourth Symphony. In 1845 he composed his C major Symphony, which was published in 1846 asNo. 2, and, in 1850, his Third Symphony. Therefore, the published numbering of the symphonies is not chronological. The reasoning for the “incorrect” numerical sequencing of the symphonies is because his Fourth Symphony was originally completed in 1841, but it was not well received at its Leipzig premiere. The lukewarm reception caused Schumann to withdraw the score and revise it ten years later in Düsseldorf. This final version was published in 1851 after the “Rhenish” Symphony was published

Genesis

The same year that Schumann composed his Third Symphony, he completed his Cello Concerto op. 129 which was published four years later. Schumann was inspired to write this symphony after a trip to the Rhineland with his wife. This journey was a happy and peaceful trip with Clara which felt to them as if they were on a pilgrimage.[5] As a result of this trip, he incorporated elements of his journey and portrayed other experiences from his life in the music. The key of the symphony has been connected to Bach’s idea of E flat major and the Holy Trinity.[6]

 

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Fabulous Composers/Compositions: Felix Mendelssohn, Violin Sonata in F Minor, Op. 4, MWV Q12, I. Adagio – Allegro moderato



Felix Mendelssohn
Romain Descharmes, Tianwa Yang, Descharmes, Romain, Gallois, Patrick, Sinfonia Finlandia Jyvaskyla, Yang, Tianwa
Violin Sonata in F Minor, Op. 4, MWV Q12
Mendelssohn: Violin Concertos – Violin Sonata in F minor
8.572662
http://www.classicsonline.com/catalog…
http://www.naxoslicensing.com/

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Great Performances: Barenboim plays Mendelssohn Songs Without Words Op.30 no.6 in F sharp Minor – Venetian Gondellied


Mendelssohn aged 12 (1821) by Carl Joseph Begas

Mendelssohn aged 12 (1821) by Carl Joseph Begas (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Fabulous Performances: Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy – A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Op. 61



A Midsummer Night’s Dream” is a play by William Shakespeare (1564-1616), believed to have been written between 1590 and 1596. It portrays the events surrounding the marriage of the Duke of Athens, Theseus, and Hippolyta. These include the adventures of four young Athenian lovers and a group of six amateur actors, who are controlled and manipulated by the fairies who inhabit the forest in which most of the play is set. The play, categorized as a Comedy, is one of Shakespeare’s most popular works for the 
stage and is widely performed across the world. [Wikipedia]

In 1826, Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) composed a concert overture, inspired by the play, that was first performed in 1827. In 1842, partly because of the fame of the overture, and partly because his employer King Friedrich Wilhelm IV of Prussia liked the incidental music that Mendelssohn had written for other plays that had been staged at the palace in German translation, Mendelssohn was commissioned to write incidental music for a production of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” that was to be staged in 1843 in Potsdam. He incorporated the existing Overture into the incidental music, which was used in most stage versions through the 19th century. The best known of the pieces from the incidental music is the famous “Wedding March”, frequently used as a recessional in weddings. [Wikipedia]

(00:00) (01) Overture op.21 and Incidental Music op.61
(11:47) (02) No. 1 Scherzo (Act II, scene 1)
(16:32) (03) No. 2
(18:21) (04) —– March of the Fairies
(19:59) (05) No. 3 (Act II, scene 2) Song with Chorus
(24:44) (06) No. 4
(25:22) (07) No. 5 [Intermezzo]
(29:30) (08) No. 7 (Act III, scene 2) [Nocturne]
(35:50) (09) No. 8 (Act IV, scene 1)
(38:23) (10) No. 9 Wedding March
(43:30) (11) No.10 (Act V, scene 1)
(44:15) (12) —– Marcia Funebre
(45:49) (13) No.11 A Dance of Clowns
(47:54) (14) No.12
(49:34) (15) No.13 Finale

Perfomers:
Judi Dench (narrator),
Kathleen Battle (soprano),
Frederica von Stade (mezzo-soprano)


Orchestra: Boston Symphony, and the Tanglewood Festival Chorus.

Conductor: Seiji Ozawa.

Felix Mendelssohn – Six Anthems for eight voices a capella opus 79 – New Year



Maulbronn Chamber Choir
The night shines as the day
Conductor: Jürgen Budday

A concert recording from the church of the
UNESCO World Heritage Site Maulbronn Monastery.
Released & created by Andreas Otto Grimminger & Josef-Stefan Kindler
in cooperation with Jürgen Budday.
Juli 2010.

F. Mendelssohn: Sechs Sprüche zum Kirchenjahr.
In durchweg opulenten 8stimmigen Sätzen durchmisst Mendelssohn die Feste des Kirchenjahres vom Advent bis zu Himmelfahrt. Dabei reicht die klangliche Palette je nach Charakter des jeweiligen Festes vom dumpfen Adagio bis hin zum strahlenden, jubelnden Allegro. Inhaltlich repräsentiert insbesondere der Text der Passionszeit das Thema des Konzertes: Die “Übeltaten”, das Elend und die Sünde stehen für die negativen Seiten des Lebens, die durch Christus in der Herrlichkeit Gottes aufgehoben werden.