Tag Archives: Figured bass

Make Music Part of Your Life: Vivaldi Concerto con molti istromenti in C major, RV558


[youtube.com/watch?v=ehv35TdZV-Q]

Vivaldi Concerto con molti istromenti in C major, RV558

Antonio Lucio Vivaldi (1678 † 1741)

Work: Concerto for 2 violins in troba marina, 2 recorders, 2 chalumeaux, 2 theorbos, 2 mandolins, violoncello, strings and basso continuo in C major, RV558

1.Movement: Allegro molto
2.Movement: Andante molto
3.Movement: Allegro

Performer:
Violins: Fabio Biondi, Lorenzo Colitto, Raffaello Negri, Carla Marotta
Violins in troba marina: Fabio Biondi, Lorenzo Colitto, Renata Spotti, Luca Giardini
Viola all’inglese: Fabio Biondi, Ernesto Braucher
Cellos: Maurizio Naddeo, Antonio Fantinuoli
Mandolines: Giovanni Scaramuzzino, Sonia Maurer
Recorders: Petr Zejfart, Maurice Steger
Oboes: Stefano Vezzani, Simone Toni, Claudio Pinardi
Bassoon: Francois de Rudder
Chalumeaux: Gili Rinot, Carles Riera
Theorbos: Giangiacomo Pinardi, Ugo Nastrucci
Harpsichords: Sergio Ciomei, Paola Erdas

Fabio Biondi, violin & direction
Europa Galante

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A. Marcello – Oboe Concerto in d minor (Marcel Ponseele, baroque oboe / Il Gardellino)



Alessandro Marcello (1684~1750)

Concerto per Oboe, Archi e Basso Continuo in re minore, SF 935 – Op.1 
(First published in 1717)

I. Andante e spiccato – 00:00
II. Adagio – 03:32
III. Presto – 07:09

Marcel Ponseele (Baroque Oboe)
Ensemble Il Gardellino 
Marcel Ponseele (conductor)

A slightly older contemporary of Antonio Vivaldi, Marcello held concerts at his hometown of Venice. He composed and published several sets of concertos, including six concertos under the title of La Cetra (The Lyre), as well as cantatas, arias, canzonets, and violin sonatas. Marcello often composed under the pseudonym Eterio Stinfalico, his name as a member of the celebrated Arcadian Academy (Pontificia Accademia degli Arcadi). He died in Padua in 1747. Alessandro’s brother was Benedetto Marcello (1686~1739), also a composer.

Although his works are infrequently performed today, Marcello is regarded as a very competent composer. His La Cetra concertos are “unusual for their wind solo parts, concision and use of counterpoint within a broadly Vivaldian style,” according to Grove, “placing them as a last outpost of the classic Venetian Baroque concerto.”

A concerto Marcello wrote in d minor for oboe, strings and basso continuo is perhaps his best-known work. Its worth was attested to by Johann Sebastian Bach who transcribed it for harpsichord (BWV 974). A number of editions have been published of the famous Oboe Concerto in d minor. The edition in c minor is credited to Benedetto Marcello.