Tag Archives: Franklin D. Roosevelt

this day in the yesteryear: The Battle of Halys (585 BCE)


The Battle of Halys (585 BCE)

Also known as the Battle of the Eclipse, the Battle of Halys was fought between the Medes and the Lydians in 585 BCE at the Halys River in what is now Turkey. The final battle of a 15-year war between Alyattes II of Lydia and Cyaxares of Media, the fight ended abruptly due to a total solar eclipse, which was perceived as an omen that the gods wanted the war to end. After a truce, the river was declared the border of the two nations. How is the exact date of the ancient battle known? More… Discuss

Today In History. What Happened This Day In History


Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

March 4

1152   Frederick Barbarossa is chosen as emperor and unites the two factions, which emerged in Germany after the death of Henry V.
1461   Henry VI is deposed and the Duke of York is proclaimed King Edward IV.
1634   Samuel Cole opens the first tavern in Boston, Massachusetts.
1766   The British Parliament repeals the Stamp Act, the cause of bitter and violent opposition in the colonies
1789   The first Congress of the United States meets in New York and declares that the Constitution is in effect.
1791   Vermont is admitted as the 14th state. It is the first addition to the original 13 colonies.
1793   George Washington is inaugurated as President for the second time.
1797   Vice-President John Adams, elected President on December 7, to replace George Washington, is sworn in.
1801   Thomas Jefferson becomes the first President to be inaugurated in Washington, D.C.
1813   The Russians fighting against Napoleon reach Berlin. The French garrison evacuates the city without a fight.
1861   The Confederate States of America adopt the “Stars and Bars” flag.
1877   The Russian Imperial Ballet stages the first performance of “Swan Lake” in Moscow.
1901   William McKinley is inaugurated president for the second time. Theodore Roosevelt is inaugurated as vice president.
1904   Russian troops begin to retreat toward the Manchurian border as 100,000 Japanese advance in Korea.
1908   The New York board of education bans the act of whipping students in school.
1912   The French council of war unanimously votes a mandatory three-year military service.
1914   Doctor Fillatre of Paris, France successfully separates Siamese twins.
1921   Warren G. Harding is sworn in as America’s 29th President.
1933   Franklin D. Roosevelt is inaugurated to his first term as president in Washington, D.C.
1944   Berlin is bombed by the American forces for the first time.
1952   North Korea accuses the United nations of using germ warfare.
1963   Six people get the death sentence in Paris plotting to kill President Charles de Gaulle.
1970   Fifty-seven people are killed as the French submarine Eurydice sinks in the Mediterranean Sea.
1975   Queen Elizabeth knights Charlie Chaplin.
1987   President Reagan takes full responsibility for the Iran-Contra affair in a national address.
Born on March 4
1394   Prince Henry the Navigator, sponsor of Portuguese voyages of discovery
1678   Antonio Vivaldi, Italian composer and violinist.
1747   Casimir Pulaski, American Revolutionary War general.
1852   Lady (Isabella Augusta) Gregory, Irish playwright, helped found the Abbey Theatre.
1888   Knute Rockne, football player and coach for Notre Dame.
1901   Charles Goren, world expert on the game of bridge.
1904   Ding Ling, Chinese writer and women’s rights activist.
1928   Alan Sillitoe, novelist (Saturday Night and Sunday Morning, The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner).
1932   Miriam Makeba, South African singer.
1934   Jane Goodall, British anthropologist, known for her work with African chimpanzees.

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/today-in-history#sthash.6XI5as8V.dpuf

Today In History. What Happened This Day In History


Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

March 4

1152   Frederick Barbarossa is chosen as emperor and unites the two factions, which emerged in Germany after the death of Henry V.
1461   Henry VI is deposed and the Duke of York is proclaimed King Edward IV.
1634   Samuel Cole opens the first tavern in Boston, Massachusetts.
1766   The British Parliament repeals the Stamp Act, the cause of bitter and violent opposition in the colonies
1789   The first Congress of the United States meets in New York and declares that the Constitution is in effect.
1791   Vermont is admitted as the 14th state. It is the first addition to the original 13 colonies.
1793   George Washington is inaugurated as President for the second time.
1797   Vice-President John Adams, elected President on December 7, to replace George Washington, is sworn in.
1801   Thomas Jefferson becomes the first President to be inaugurated in Washington, D.C.
1813   The Russians fighting against Napoleon reach Berlin. The French garrison evacuates the city without a fight.
1861   The Confederate States of America adopt the “Stars and Bars” flag.
1877   The Russian Imperial Ballet stages the first performance of “Swan Lake” in Moscow.
1901   William McKinley is inaugurated president for the second time. Theodore Roosevelt is inaugurated as vice president.
1904   Russian troops begin to retreat toward the Manchurian border as 100,000 Japanese advance in Korea.
1908   The New York board of education bans the act of whipping students in school.
1912   The French council of war unanimously votes a mandatory three-year military service.
1914   Doctor Fillatre of Paris, France successfully separates Siamese twins.
1921   Warren G. Harding is sworn in as America’s 29th President.
1933   Franklin D. Roosevelt is inaugurated to his first term as president in Washington, D.C.
1944   Berlin is bombed by the American forces for the first time.
1952   North Korea accuses the United nations of using germ warfare.
1963   Six people get the death sentence in Paris plotting to kill President Charles de Gaulle.
1970   Fifty-seven people are killed as the French submarine Eurydice sinks in the Mediterranean Sea.
1975   Queen Elizabeth knights Charlie Chaplin.
1987   President Reagan takes full responsibility for the Iran-Contra affair in a national address.
Born on March 4
1394   Prince Henry the Navigator, sponsor of Portuguese voyages of discovery
1678   Antonio Vivaldi, Italian composer and violinist.
1747   Casimir Pulaski, American Revolutionary War general.
1852   Lady (Isabella Augusta) Gregory, Irish playwright, helped found the Abbey Theatre.
1888   Knute Rockne, football player and coach for Notre Dame.
1901   Charles Goren, world expert on the game of bridge.
1904   Ding Ling, Chinese writer and women’s rights activist.
1928   Alan Sillitoe, novelist (Saturday Night and Sunday Morning, The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner).
1932   Miriam Makeba, South African singer.
1934   Jane Goodall, British anthropologist, known for her work with African chimpanzees.

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/today-in-history#sthash.jOb7FTDK.dpuf

quotation: Love and scandal are the best sweeteners of tea. Henry Fielding


Love and scandal are the best sweeteners of tea.

Henry Fielding (1707-1754) Discuss

Today In History. What Happened This Day In History


Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

January 23

1901   A great fire ravages Montreal, resulting in $2.5 million in property lost.
1913   The “Young Turks” revolt because they are angered by the concessions made at the London peace talks.
1932   Franklin D. Roosevelt enters the presidential race.
1948   The Soviets refuse UN entry into North Korea to administer elections.
1949   The Communist Chinese forces begin their advance on Nanking.
1950   Jerusalem becomes the official capital of Israel.
1951   President Truman creates the Commission on Internal Security and Individual Rights, to monitor the anti-Communist campaign.
1969   NASA unveils moon-landing craft.
1973   President Richard Nixon claims that Vietnam peace has been reached in Paris and that the POWs would be home in 60 days.
1977   Alex Haley’s Roots begins a record-breaking eight-night broadcast on ABC.
1981   Under international pressure, opposition leader Kim Dae Jung’s death sentence is commuted to life imprisonment in Seoul.
1986   U.S. begins maneuvers off the Libyan coast.
Born on January 23
1832   Édouard Manet, French impressionist painter best known for Luncheon in the Grass.
1899   Humphrey Bogart, U.S. film actor (The African Queen, Casablanca, The Maltese Falcon).
1919   Ernie Kovacs, U.S. comedian and television personality.
1957   Princess Caroline of Monaco.

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/today-in-history#sthash.RlNlhdkI.dpuf

today’s Image: George Washington Carver (Library of Congress)



George Washington Carver
After devoting his life to helping fellow African Americans through education, George Washington Carver died on January 5, 1943, at Tuskegee, Alabama. Carver was born the son of a slave woman in the early 1860s, went to college in Iowa and then headed to Alabama in 1896. There, at the Tuskegee Institute, Carver served as an agricultural chemist, experimenter, teacher and administrator, working to improve life for African Americans in the rural South by teaching them better agricultural skills. One of the farming methods Carver devised, using peanut and soybean crops to enrich soil depleted by cotton crops, revolutionized Southern farming. Carver became somewhat of a benevolent example of the potential of black intellectuals. He was well-respected by people such as President Franklin D. Roosevelt, Mahatma Gandhi, Josef Stalin and Thomas Edison, whose offer of a job for more than $100 a year Carver refused. Carver worked at Tuskegee until his death.

Image: Library of Congress

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.kQvgtdYP.dpuf

today’s picture: John Muir (Library of Congress)



John Muir

Naturalist and forest conservation advocate John Muir was largely responsible for the establishment of national parks such as Sequoia and Yosemite. After graduating from the University of Wisconsin, Scottish immigrant Muir worked on mechanical inventions, but when an industrial accident blinded him in one eye, he abandoned that career and devoted himself to nature. As early as 1876, Muir encouraged the federal government to establish a forest conservation program. The Sequoia and Yosemite parks were created in 1890 and two eloquent articles by Muir swayed public opinion in favor of federally protected national forests. Muir also influenced the conservation policy of President Theodore Roosevelt, who is shown here with Muir during a 1903 camping trip to Yosemite.

Library of Congress

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.cYKPJNgC.dpuf

Today’s Holiday: Bill of Rights Day (2014)


Today’s Holiday

Bill of Rights Day (2014)

The first 10 amendments to the US Constitution of 1787—referred to collectively as the Bill of Rights—were ratified on December 15, 1791. This landmark document protected American citizens from specific abuses by their government and guaranteed such basic rights as the freedom of religion, freedom of speech, and freedom of the press. In 1941, President Franklin D. Roosevelt designated December 15 as Bill of Rights Day and called upon Americans to observe it with appropriate patriotic ceremonies. More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: The Japanese Attack Pearl Harbor (1941)


Pearl Harbor – Dec. 7, 1941 – The only color film of the attack

The Japanese Attack Pearl Harbor (1941)

The surprise aerial attack by the Japanese on Pearl Harbor in Oahu, Hawaii, destroyed 188 aircraft and several American naval vessels, killed more than 2,300 American military personnel, and wounded more than 1,100. The following day, the US declared war on Japan, entering World War II. Pearl Harbor is now a national historic landmark, and a memorial has been built over the sunken hull of the USS Arizona. How many Japanese planes attacked the American fleet that fateful day? More… Discuss

Rachmaninoff: Piano Concerto Nr. 3 in D minor , op.30 (1909) – Horowitz/New York Philharmonic Orchestra/Zubin Metha,Conducting: Great compositions/performances


this day in the yesteryear: Ronald DeFeo, Jr., Murders Family in Amityville, New York (1974)


Ronald DeFeo, Jr., Murders Family in Amityville, New York (1974)

After the DeFeo family was discovered murdered in their beds, Ronald DeFeo, Jr.—the family’s only surviving member—was placed under police protection. DeFeo initially told investigators that he believed the murders were a mob hit, but he soon confessed and was convicted of murdering his parents and four siblings. A number of controversies surround the case, especially regarding the possible involvement of DeFeo’s sister Dawn. What best-selling novel and series of films did these events inspire? More… Discuss

Just a thought: Take a full sensorial visit in nature:… by George-B


Just a thought: “Take a full sensorial visit in nature: No, not the tunnel type, meant to exclude senses but one, rather a total immersion in nature: see everything, hear everything, experience everything, without judgement, with the sole purpose of…being in that moment!” -George-B

The fault in our czars | The Verge


Ebola Czar

via The fault in our czars | The Verge.

At first blush an Ebola Czar, or any czar really, invokes an image of a cruel and omnipotent character parading around in heavy velvet robes, and carrying a jeweled scepter. Not an obvious choice for someone to manage a national healthcare crisis. But take a look under that robe and you’ll find that “‘czar” — at least in the context of American politics — is a relatively meaningless term, largely crafted by the media as convenient shorthand for long, cumbersome titles. It’s a blustery euphemism meant to inspire confidence when in fact, these czars are little more than run-of-the-mill government appointees, often faced with the same challenges as less imperious workers. Just like other employees, czars are eventually replaced, retire, or their positions are scrapped.

Today’s Ebola czar joins a long and storied rank of czars who have reigned over political kingdoms large, small, and on occasion, bizarre. So we thought we’d pull together a sample platter of our favorite presidentially-appointed government czars. It will, I’m certain, leave you czar struck.

Manpower Czar – Appointed in 1942 by Franklin Roosevelt
Rubber Czar – Appointed in 1942 by Franklin Roosevelt
Shipping Czar – Appointed in 1942 by Franklin Roosevelt
Cleanup Czar – Appointed in 1952 by Harry Truman
Missile Czar – Appointed in 1957 by Dwight D. Eisenhower
Savings & Loan Czar – Appointed in 1990 by George H. W. Bush
Border Czar – Appointed in 1995 by Bill Clinton
E-commerce Czar – Appointed by Al Gore in 1998
Bioethics Czar – Appointed in 2001 by George W. Bush
Reading Czar – Appointed in 2001 by George W. Bush
Cyber Security Czar – Appointed in 2001 by George W. Bush
Science Czar – Appointed in 2001 by George W. Bush
Bird Flu Czar – Appointed in 2004 by George W. Bush
Democracy Czar – Appointed in 2005 by George W. Bush
Birth Control Czar – Appointed in 2006 by George W. Bush
War Czar – Appointed in 2007 by George W. Bush
Weatherization Czar – Appointed in 2008 by George W. Bush
Copyright Czar – Appointed in 2009 by Barack Obama
Urban Affairs Czar – Appointed in 2009 by Barack Obama
Ethics czar – Appointed in 2009 by Barack Obama
Great Lakes Czar – Appointed in 2009 by Barack Obama
Guantanamo Base Closure Czar – Appointed in 2009 by Barack Obama
Iran Czar – Appointed in 2009 by Barack Obama
Safe School Czar – Appointed in 2009 by Barack Obama
Weapons of Mass Destruction Czar – Appointed in 2009 by Barack Obama
Asian Carp Czar – Appointed in 2010 by Barack Obama

quotation: James Madison


I believe there are more instances of the abridgement of the freedom of the people by gradual and silent encroachments of those in power than by violent and sudden usurpations.

James Madison (1751-1836) Discuss

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TODAY’S HOLIDAY: National Maritime Day


National Maritime Day

It was President Franklin D. Roosevelt who first proclaimed May 22 as National Maritime Day in 1933. Since that time, observations of this day have grown in popularity, particularly in American port cities. Ships are opened to the public, maritime art and essay contests are held, and parades and band concerts are common. Environmentalists sometimes take advantage of the attention focused on the country’s maritime heritage on this day to draw attention to pollution and deterioration of maritime environments, particularly in large commercial ports like New York City. More… Discuss

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This Day in History: US President Franklin D. Roosevelt Forbids Hoarding of Gold (1933)


US President Franklin D. Roosevelt Forbids Hoarding of Gold (1933)

Executive Order 6012 required US citizens and businesses to turn in all but a small amount of gold to the Federal Reserve in exchange for $20.67 per ounce. It came in the midst of a banking crisis, when the stability of paper currency was in doubt. Consequently, many tried to withdraw their money and redeem it for gold, which was considered safer. However, there simply was not enough gold in the US—or the world—to cover the nation’s debts. How many people were prosecuted for violating the order? More… Discuss

Anti-Union Law Fuels Massive Voter Turnout for Historic Wisconsin Recall – via Democracy Now


Anti-Union Law Fuels Massive Voter Turnout for Historic Wisconsin Recall

Anti-Union Law Fuels Massive Voter Turnout for Historic Wisconsin Recall (click here to read and watch more about this grave issue at Democracy Now)

 Just as “injury to one is injury to all”, the reversal is true: “Injury to all is injury to one”. While prosperity is a measure of a healthy society, in long run, the distribution of wealth is fundamental. Franklin D. Roosevelt understood this, and allowed a larger share of wealth to reach more people, and in turn created an infrastructure that still stands. Now in the information age, and post-service society, we needed to keep up that infrastructure, and build the avenues of the present and the future: The fiber optics communication cables to help, not for the profit of few greedy corporations, the same that charge 10 times less in other countries, that they charge here, for less access, but for everyone. People have  to be united by a common effort, and the effort must be fundamental, such as survival: One does not need to be a politician, or a lawmaker to realize that.  
So there is an example of vision, that worked: Our generation has been the beneficiary. Now it’s our turn to create, not to destroy,  mindful of  what the next generation will remember us by.
What do you whant to be remembered by?

This Day in History: Potsdam Conference Concludes (1945)


Potsdam Conference Concludes (1945)

The Potsdam Conference was an Allied conference held in the Berlin suburb of Potsdam after Germany’s surrender in World War II. Representing the US, USSR, and UK, respectively, Harry Truman, Joseph Stalin, and Winston Churchill met there to discuss European peace settlements and reparations, the administration of Germany, the demarcation of Poland, the occupation of Austria, the USSR’s role in eastern Europe, and the war against Japan. Who replaced Churchill during the conference? More… Discuss