Tag Archives: Frédéric Chopin

Great Compositions/Performances: Leonard Bernstein interprets Maurice Ravel’s Piano Concerto in G


[youtube.com/watch?v=4jYVnNHo3S8]
Great Compositions/Performances: Leonard Bernstein interprets Maurice Ravel‘s Piano Concerto in G

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Arthur Rubinstein plays Chopin-Piano Concerto No.2 London Symphony Orchestra, André Previn conducting


Great Compositions/Performances:  Rubinstein-Chopin-Piano Concerto No.2

Frédéric Chopin Piano Concerto N.º 2 Op. 21 in F minor: Maestoso-Larghetto-Allegro Vivace-Arthur Rubinstein, Pianist
London Symphony Orchestra conducted by André Previn (HD video)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Piano Concerto No. 2 in F minorOp. 21, is a piano concerto composed by Frédéric Chopin in 1830. Chopin wrote the piece before he had finished his formal education, at around 20 years of age. It was first performed on 17 March 1830, in WarsawPoland, with the composer as soloist. It was the second of his piano concertos to be published (after the Piano Concerto No. 1), and so was designated as “No. 2”, even though it was written first.

The work contains the three movements typical of instrumental concertos of the period: MaestosoLarghetto and Allegro vivace. What makes Chopin’s Op. 21 an early-Romantic concerto par excellence is the dominance of the piano part. After introducing the first movement, the orchestra cedes all responsibility for musical development to the piano; there is none of the true interplay of forces that is the mainstay of the classical concerto. Chopin’s orchestration is considered by many to be poor. Berlioz, himself a master orchestrator, was harsh in his appraisal, calling Chopin’s treatment “nothing but a cold and useless accompaniment.”

If the first movement bears the stamp of the stile brillante, the second shows the influence of Italian opera. The piano style of not only Chopin, but also his contemporaries, owes much to the bel canto operas of composers like Gioachino Rossini and Vincenzo Bellini, as well as to the leading singers of the day. The delicate melodic embroidery in the outer section is unmistakably operatic; so, too, is the arioso-like piano writing, over trembling strings, in the middle section. Chopin confessed in a letter, that the second movement had been inspired by his secret passion for a younger singer at the Warsaw Conservatory, with whom he had fallen in love and dreamed of for six months without once speaking to her. This larghetto remained one of his favourites, and excited the admiration of Schumann and Liszt.

In the third movement, there is another unmistakable influence. We hear the rhythm of the Polish mazurka, though in a brilliantly stylized setting. Once again, the piano, both in its poetic and virtuosic veins, dominate the music, with the orchestra largely relegated to the roles of cushion and punctuation mark.

In the finale, the violins are at one point instructed to play col legno (with the wood of the bow).

Analysis

Kevin Bazzan states “Chopin’s concertos – indeed, all of his works in classical forms – have always suffered from comparisons with those of Mozart and Beethoven. It is an old cliché that the larger classical forms he had studied at the Warsaw Conservatory were incompatible with his imagination. As early as 1852, writers such as Liszt remarked that Chopin “did violence to his genius every time he sought to fetter it by rules.” But he was not trying to re-interpret the classical concerto. He was working in a different tradition called stile brillante, made fashionable by such virtuoso pianist-composers as Weber and Hummel. Chopin borrowed from their example a conception of the concerto as a loosely organized showcase for a virtuoso soloist, as opposed to a more balanced, cohesive and densely argued musical drama in the classical vein.

There is no denying that Chopin’s concertos betray a youthful want of formal sophistication but, as one observer wrote, they “linger in the memory for the poetry of their detail rather than the strength of their structures.” Those details are so bold and colourful, so imaginative and personal, that the concertos have become the only large-scale early works of Chopin to retain a place in the repertoire.

Frédéric Chopin: Nocturne op.9 no.1 in B-flat minor (by Vadim Chaimovich)



This is my 2009 studio recording of Chopin’s Nocturne op.9 no.1.
This nocturne is one of the most beautiful short pieces by the celebrated master of the “song of the night”, it has a rhythmic freedom that came to characterize Chopin’s later work…
Enjoy!

Frederic Chopin – Nocturne op. 9 no. 1 in B-flat Minor
Vadim Chaimovich, piano

 

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GREAT PERFORMANCES: Enrica Ciccarelli : Chopin Ballade G minor



Enrica Ciccarelli : Chopin Ballade G minor

 

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Best Classical Music YouTube Collection: Classical Music Mix – Best Classical Pieces Part II (2/2)


Make this the best post of 2014: RATE, LIKE, COMMENT! Above all ENJOY!

Published on Mar 29, 2013 – 751,382 view to date

A mix with some of the best classical pieces in the world. Part II

Compositions name list:

00:00 – Amilcare Ponchielli – Dance of the Hours
05:20 – Bach – Tocata And Fugue In D Minor
12:03 – Beethoven – 5th Symphony (1st movement)
19:08 – Beethoven – 9th Symphony (Ode To Joy)
25:23 – Beethoven – Für Elise (piano version)
28:18 – Carl Orff – O Fortuna (Carmina Burana)
30:57 – Georges Bizet – Habanera
33:06 – Frederic Chopin – Funeral March
38:16 – Delibes – The Flower Duet (Lakmé)
42:49 – Edvard GriegIn the Hall of the Mountain King
45:17 – Franz Liszt – Hungarian Rhapsody No 2 (orchestra version)
55:48 – Georges Bizet – Les Toreadors
58:07 – Händel – Messiah – Hallelujah Chorus
1:02:08 – Mozart – Serenade No 13 (Allegro)
1:07:53 – Offenbach – Can Can
1:10:05 – Rossini – William Tell Overture
1:13:29 Aram Khachaturian – Sabre Dance
1:15:53 – Tchaikovsky – 1812 Overture
1:24:19 – Tchaikovsky – Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy
1:26:48 – Vivaldi – Four Seasons (spring)

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Claudio Arrau


Claudio Arrau

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 

Claudio Arrau in 1974, by Allan Warren

Claudio Arrau León (February 6, 1903 – June 9, 1991)[1] was a Chilean pianist known for his interpretations of a vast repertoire spanning from the baroque to 20th-century composers, especiallyBeethovenSchubertChopinSchumannLiszt and Brahms. He is widely considered one of the greatest pianists of the twentieth century.

 

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Great Performances: Chopin – Valentina Igoshina – Fantasie Impromptu



This is Valentina Igoshina playing Chopin’s Fantasie Impromptu in C Sharp Minor, Op. 66. Apologies for the shoddy editing! Check out my channel for information about Valentina and her music

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
Valentina Igoshina
Valentina1.jpg

Valentina Igoshina in March 2010 at Rickman Auditorium in Arnold, Missouri
Background information
Born November 4, 1978 (age 35)
Origin Russia
Genres classical
Occupations classical pianist
Instruments piano
Labels Warner Classics International
Website www.valentina-igoshina.com

Valentina Igoshina (b. 4 November 1978 BryanskBryansk OblastRussia) is a Russian classical pianist.

Valentina Igoshina began studying piano with her mother,[1] and first took lessons at home at the age of four. At the age of twelve she began attending the Moscow Central School of Music and became a student of Sergei Dorensky and Larissa Dedova at the Moscow Tchaikovsky Conservatory.[2]

Igoshina has also served as a teacher of piano at the Moscow Tchaikovsky Conservatory in Moscow. Between recitals and concerts, she currently divides her time between Moscow and Paris.[3] Her home in France is near Giverny in Haute-Normandie.

 

 

 

C. Saint – Saens Morceau de concert op. 94 | Peter Müseler, Horn



Conducted by Juri Lebedev | Summer Concert 2007 at Belvedere School of Music Weimar/Germany | Musikgymnasium Schloß Belvedere

 

FABULOUS COMPOSERS/COMPOSITIOINS: Johann Nepomuk Hummel: Piano Concerto No. 3 in B minor, Op 89



Johann Nepomuk Hummel (1778-1837)

Piano Concerto No. 3 in B minor, Op. 89

I. Allegro moderato
II. Larghetto 16:55
III. Finale: Vivace 24:48

Stephen Hough, piano
English Chamber Orchestra
Bryden Thomson, conductor

Johann Nepomuk Hummel (November 14, 1778 — October 17, 1837) was an Austrian composer and virtuoso pianist. His music reflects the transition from the Classical to the Romantic musical era.

Hummel was born in Pressburg, Kingdom of Hungary, then a part of the Austrian Habsburg Monarchy (now Bratislava in Slovakia). His father, Johannes Hummel, was the director of the Imperial School of Military Music in Vienna and the conductor there of Emanuel Schikaneder’s theatre orchestra at the Theater auf der Wieden; his mother, Margarethe Sommer Hummel, was the widow of the wigmaker Josef Ludwig. He was named after St John of Nepomuk. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart offered the boy music lessons at the age of eight after being impressed with his ability. Hummel was taught and housed by Mozart for two years free of charge and made his first concert appearance at the age of nine at one of Mozart’s concerts. Continue reading

Great Performances: Rubinstein-Chopin-Piano Concerto No.2


Great Performances:  Rubinstein-Chopin-Piano Concerto No.2
Frédéric Chopin Piano Concerto N.º 2 Op. 21 in F minor: Maestoso-Larghetto-Allegro Vivace-Arthur Rubinstein, Pianist
London Symphony Orchestra conducted by André Previn (HD video)

From Wikipedia

The Piano Concerto No. 2 in F minorOp. 21, is a piano concerto composed by Frédéric Chopin in 1830. Chopin wrote the piece before he had finished his formal education, at around 20 years of age. It was first performed on 17 March 1830, in WarsawPoland, with the composer as soloist. It was the second of his piano concertos to be published (after the Piano Concerto No. 1), and so was designated as “No. 2”, even though it was written first.
The work contains the three movements typical of instrumental concertos of the period:

  1. Maestoso
  2. Larghetto and 
  3. Allegro vivace.

What makes Chopin’s Op. 21 an early-Romantic concerto par excellence is the dominance of the piano part. After introducing the first movement, the orchestra cedes all responsibility for musical development to the piano; there is none of the true interplay of forces that is the mainstay of the classical concerto.

Martha Argerich, Mazurka Op 59 No 1, Chopin Competition 1965



From the Chopin Competition in 1965.

Mazurka Op. 59, No. 1 in A Minor.

Music by Frederic Chopin.

Chopin- Waltz no. 7 in C sharp minor, Op. 64 no. 2



Waltz no. 7 in C sharp minor
Opus 64 no. 2
Frederic Chopin

Performed by Philippe Entremont

 

Great Musical Moments: Rubinstein-Chopin-Piano Concerto No.2



Frédéric Chopin Piano Concerto N.º 2 Op. 21 in F minor: Maestoso-Larghetto-Allegro Vivace-Arthur Rubinstein, Pianist
London Symphony Orchestra conducted by André Previn

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Piano Concerto No. 2 in F minorOp. 21, is a piano concerto composed by Frédéric Chopin in 1830. Chopin wrote the piece before he had finished his formal education, at around 20 years of age. It was first performed on 17 March 1830, in WarsawPoland, with the composer as soloist. It was the second of his piano concertos to be published (after the Piano Concerto No. 1), and so was designated as “No. 2”, even though it was written first.
The work contains the three movements typical of instrumental concertos of the period:
Maestoso,
Larghetto and
Allegro vivace.  Continue reading

Beethoven – Sonata No. 15 D-dur – Valery Afanasiev, piano



Не правда ли, необычное (как бы странное) исполнение (интерпретация)?
Конец сонаты в этом моём ТВ-рипе, к сожалению, обрезан (отсутствует).
==========================================

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Valery Afanassiev (Russian: Валерий Павлович Афанасьев, Valerij Pavlovič Afanasiev; born 8 September 1947) is a Russian pianist, writer and conductor.

 

 

Hypnotic Performances: Valentina Lisitsa Plays Chopin Nocturne Op 27 # 2 D Flat Major



From Valentina:  “I went through love-hate “relationship” with this Nocturne. When I was asked by Lanaudiere Fesitval to select 7 Nocturnes for the concert ( I never played any before – to my utter shame ) I had to quickly flip through the sheet music and pick ones I thought I might stand 🙂 This one was number “last” on my list of things to do. I didn’t start learning it until it was almost too late ( those who watched my webcast of practice can confirm :-)). I dreaded the moment when I will get sick and tired of this sweetest thing ever written with its gorgeous but repetitious melody….
Then I had my “eureka” moment . it happened when I started looking at Chopin’s metronome markings – in all other Nocturnes they were perfectly in sync with today’s consensus – maybe little faster here , slower there… But this one – oh my God ! Lento Sostenuto marked as 50 beats per minute in half-measure ( 150BPM in eights ). You know how fast is it ???? Check-it out and see if you can keep up with Mr. Chopin LOL ….. i can’t , I still play it waaaaaay under tempo .Let’s see how many “critics” will leave comments saying it is too fast …..But , no matter what it makes a perfect sense- and suddenly my dread turned into astonishment at Chopin’s genius.The whole piece is suddenly transformed from overly long sugary-syrupy chant to an exalted and impassioned speech- you make whatever you want of this speech , maybe it is a declaration of love ? after all – the piece ends with the most beautiful duet of two voices….”

 

Fabulous Performances: Artur Rubinstein plays Liebestraum nº3 Liszt (“without a scratch”)



Artur Rubinstein plays Liebestraum nº3 Liszt (without a scratch)
(Rec. 1954)

 

CHOPIN: Scherzo in E, Op. 54 – GEORGE WALKER



George Walker, piano

from Albany TROY697 (2005)

http://www.albanyrecords.com

The songs for voice and piano by George Walker are among the finest written by an American composer and are “as outstanding as they are varied” according to Fanfare Magazine. Modus for Chamber Ensemble was commissioned by the Cygnus Ensemble. It received its premiere in New York in March, 2001. The four movements are characterized by recurring motives and highly rhythmical sections of great intensity. The title, Modus, refers to the elegant techniques used to transform and unify the movements. The Prayer for Organ was composed in 1996, 50 years after Walker’s famous Lyric for Strings, a memorial to his grandmother, was written. The similarity between these two works lies in the use of contrapuntal techniques. The Improvisation on St. Theodulph is a fantasia on the melody stated before the work begins. The Prayer and the Improvisation were commissioned by the regional chapter of the American Guild of Organists in Washington, D.C. Spires was commissioned for performance by Dr. Mickey Thomas Terry at the Convention in Denver of the National Chapter of the American Guild of Organists in 1998.

Contents:
George Walker, composer
In Time of Silver Rain
Patricia Green, mezzo-soprano, George Walker, piano

George Walker, composer
I Never Saw A Moor
Patricia Green, mezzo-soprano, George Walker, piano

George Walker, composer
Mother Goose
Patricia Green, mezzo-soprano, George Walker, piano

George Walker, composer
Response
Patricia Green, mezzo-soprano, George Walker, piano

George Walker, composer
Softly, Blow Lightly
Patricia Green, mezzo-soprano, George Walker, piano

George Walker, composer
Wild Nights
Patricia Green, mezzo-soprano, George Walker, piano

George Walker, composer
Mary Wore Three Links of Chain
Patricia Green, mezzo-soprano, George Walker, piano

George Walker, composer
Modus for Chamber Ensemble
Tara O’Connor, flute, Robert Ingliss, oboe, William Anderson, guitar, Oren Fader, guitar, Calvin Wiersma, violin, Susannah Chapman, cello

Franz Liszt, composer
Sonetto del Petrarca 104
George Walker, piano

Franz Liszt, composer
Valse Oubliee No. 1
George Walker, piano

Frederic Chopin, composer
Mazurka in C, op. 33, no. 2
George Walker, piano

Frederic Chopin, composer
Mazurka in D flat, op. 30, no. 3
George Walker, piano

Frederic Chopin, composer
Mazurka in f minor, op. 63, no. 2
George Walker, piano

Frederic Chopin, composer
Etude in G flat, op. 10, no. 5
George Walker, piano

Frederic Chopin, composer
Scherzo in E, op. 54
George Walker, piano

George Walker, composer
Prayer
Trent Johnson, organ

George Walker, composer
Improvisation on St. Theodulph
Trent Johnson, organ

George Walker, composer
Spires
Trent Johnson, organ

 

Chopin Trio Op.8 Tchekoratova/Penchev/Tanev at Bulgaria Hall



Fryderyk Chopin Trio Op.8 in G minor
Tchekoratova/Penchev/Tanev at Bulgaria Hall 
1:Allegro con fuoco 2:Scherzo 3:Adagio 4:Finale

From the Concert “Romance for 3″
Sofia Philharmonic & Quarto Quartet present:
30 April 2013 at Bulgaria Concert Hall
Ivan Penchev – violin, Lora Tchekoratova – piano & Christo Tanev – cello 
Chopin – Piano Trio in G minor, Op.8 & TchaikovskyPiano Trio in A minor (“In Memory of a Great Artist”), Op.50
A project of Quarto Quartet (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Quarto… )

 

Valentina Lisitsa: Chopin Berceuse Op 57 D Flat Major


Valentina Lisitsa: Chopin Berceuse Op 57 D Flat Major

 

Chopin Grande Valse Brillante Op. 18 Valentina Lisitsa


Grand Waltz Brilliante E Flat major op. 18

 

Chopin “Heroic” Polonaise op 53 A flat major Valentina Lisitsa (MAGNIFICENT)



Chopin “Heroic” Polonaise op 53 A flat major Valentina Lisitsa

 

Valentina Lisitsa: Chopin Nocturne Op 48 No.1 C minor (What a precious musical interpretation!)



One of Chopin’s most priceless performance remarks is at the beginning of this Nocturne — “sotto voce“. Just like that : not a girlish “piano” , not an ambivalent “mezzo forte” , not even meaty forte ( the last thing you want here is an “opera” voice for this melody ).It effectively bars all over-the-top cheap and showy “expressive emotions” — no eye rolling allowed , no hair flailing, no hands flying , no sobs , no visible tears…. A musical equivalent of the famed British ” keeping a stiff upper lip “- this “sotto voce” gives us the right sense of what this piece is about .Just as Chopin’s 2nd sonata this nocturne deals directly and openly with such tragic subjects as death, loss and grief … except , here you are allowed to leave personal comments. 2nd sonata is a depiction of all those things , this Nocturne is a commentary- or an epitaph…..the fifth movement that would come after the Finale …If you ever visit La Madeleine in Paris ( Chopin’s parish church where his funeral was held on October 30th ) think about this Nocturne , OK?

PS. Talking about parallels between Rachmaninoff and Chopin works , don’t you think that “doppio movimento” part ( last pages ) sounds ominously like Rachmaninoff Etude-Tableau E flat Minor Op39?

Edvard Grieg – Piano Concerto in A minor Op. 16



Allegro Molto Moderato (0:02) [13.11]
Adagio (13:14) [6.05]
Allegro Moderato Molto E Marcato Quasi Presto Andante Maestoso (19:20) [10.20]

This concerto in three movements was composed by Edvard Grieg in 1868.
Performer Dubravka Tomsic
Radio Symphony Orchestra Ljubljana
Conductor: Anton Nanut

Music of The Orchard Music, APM Music and IODA

 

Impromptu No. 1 Op.29 In Ab – Chopin



The Frederic Chopin Complete Works
Piano: Andre Silotti

 

Frederic Chopin – Variations on a Theme by Rossini – Flute & Piano



Flutist Jonathan Brahms and pianist Kenneth Gartner perform Chopin’s Variations on a Theme of Rossini, opus posthumous, at The Kosciusko Foundation in New York City on February 18, 1989. The theme is from “La Cenerentola” (Cinderella).

Tema: Andantino
Variation 1: Allegretto
Variation 2: Andante
Variation 3: Allegretto 
Variation 4: Allegro assai

 

Frederic Chopin Polonaise in A flat Major, Op.40 No.1 “Military” Vladimir Horowitz: piano



Frederic Chopin
Polonaise in A flat Major, Op.40 No.1 “Military”
Vladimir Horowitz: piano

Frédéric Chopin – Les Sylphides (musique de ballet)



Frédéric Chopin (1810-1849), Polska / France 

– Les Sylphides (musique de ballet)

The Philadelphia Orchestra
Eugene Ormandy

Buy “Les Sylphides” on

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Pauline Viardot – L’enfant de la Montagne – Enrica Ciccarelli, Amarilli Nizza



Pauline Viardot – L’enfant de la Montagne – Enrica Ciccarelli [piano], Amarilli Nizza [voice]

Facebookhttp://www.facebook.com/PianistaEnric

Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/EnricaPianist

Website: http://www.enricaciccarelli.com

This song featured as a bonus track in the cd FREDERIC CHOPIN: DOUZE MAZOURKES, recorded by pianist Enrica Ciccarelli and soprano Amarilli Nizza on 4-6 september 1998, Villa Medici, Briosco.

FREDERIC CHOPIN
Douze Marzourkes arranged for singing by Pauline Viardot

 

Oleg Boshniakovich plays Chopin’s Barcarolle in F# Op.60


Barcarolle in F# Op.60, Frederic Chopin

Ashkenazy plays Chopin Nocturne Op.9 No.1


Thanking Hetterbell and Windwisper for commenting and contributing with their Chopin Nocturne no.9 op.1:

The Nocturnes, Op. 9 are a set of three nocturnes written by Frédéric Chopin between 1830 and 1832 and dedicated to Madame Camille Pleyel. The work was published in 1833.

(Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nocturnes,_Op._9_(Chopin))

English: Second theme from Chopin's Nocturne O...

Image via Wikipedia

Zimerman plays Schubert Impromptu Op. 90 No. 1



Zimerman plays Schubert

Franz Schubert‘s Impromptus, Opp. 90 and 142 (posth.), are a series of pieces for solo piano composed in 1827 and first published during the composer‘s lifetime (or shortly thereafter) under that name. There are eight such Impromptus in total.

Three other unnamed piano compositions, written in May 1828, a few months before the composer’s death, are alternatively indicated as Impromptus or Klavierstücke (“piano pieces”).

The Impromptus are often considered companion pieces to the Six moments musicaux, and they are often recorded and published together.

It has been said that Schubert was deeply influenced in writing these pieces by the Impromptus, Op. 7, of Jan Václav Voříšek (1822) and by the music of Voříšek’s teacher Václav Tomášek.[1][2]
Biography

Zimerman was born in Zabrze, Poland, and studied at the University of Music in Katowice under Andrzej Jasiński. His career was launched when he won the 1975 Warsaw International Frederick Chopin Piano Competition. He performed with the Berlin Philharmonic conducted by Herbert von Karajan in 1976 and he made his debut in the United States with the New York Philharmonic in 1979. He has toured widely and made a number of recordings. Since 1996 he has taught piano at the Academy of Music in Basel, Switzerland.

Zimerman is best known for his interpretations of Romantic music, but has performed a wide variety of classical pieces as well. He has also been a supporter of contemporary music. For example, Witold Lutosławski wrote his piano concerto for Zimerman, who later recorded it. Amongst his best-known recordings are the piano concerti of Edvard Grieg and Robert Schumann with conductor Herbert von Karajan; the Brahms concerti with Leonard Bernstein, the piano concerti of Frédéric Chopin, one recording conducted by Carlo Maria Giulini and a later one conducted by himself at the keyboard; the Third, Fourth and Fifth Piano Concertos of Beethoven under Bernstein (Zimerman himself led the accompaniment of the Vienna Philharmonic from the keyboard in Beethoven’s First and Second Concertos); the first and second piano concerti of Rachmaninoff; the piano concerti of Franz Liszt with Seiji Ozawa, the piano concerti of Maurice Ravel with Pierre Boulez, and solo piano works by Frédéric Chopin, Franz Liszt, Claude Debussy and Franz Schubert.
(Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Krystian_Zimerman)