Tag Archives: French cuisine

this pressed: Les luminessences d’Avignon | Palais des Papes – Avignon


Seeing it in all its majesty, standing proud in the historical heart of Avignon, people often wonder: but what were popes doing here in Provence? Why did they leave the Roman hillsides to come to the banks of the Rhône? The monumental video projection, music and story-telling reveal the history of the building, the city and the region like never before. At the meeting of Europe’s great rivers, in the centre of old Avignon, come and experience an extraordinary 360° journey in time and space. For an unforgettable evening, on a unique and exceptional site: the cour d’Honneur of the Palais des Papes.

via Les luminessences d’Avignon | Palais des Papes – Avignon.

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Le Cordon Bleu


Le Cordon Bleu

Le Cordon Bleu—”The Blue Ribbon“—is an international group of cooking schools teaching French cuisine. The school’s name comes from an elite order of French knights who were awarded the Cross of the Holy Spirit, which hung from a blue ribbon. Because these knights were known for their extravagant banquets, the blue ribbon became synonymous with excellent cooking. The school opened in 1895 as an outgrowth of La Cuisinière Cordon Bleu magazine. Who are some of its famous alumni? More… Discuss

Today’s Birthday: AUGUSTE ESCOFFIER (1846)


Auguste Escoffier (1846)

Escoffier was a legendary French chef credited with inventing peach Melba and other classic dishes. He began his career in his uncle’s kitchen, and by the time he retired some 60 years later, he had directed the kitchens of several grand European hotels and earned himself a reputation as the “Emperor of Chefs.” In 1903, he published Le Guide Culinaire, which contains 5,000 recipes and is still used today as both a cookbook and cooking textbook. How did peach Melba get its name? More… Discuss