Tag Archives: Gaza Strip

this day in the yesteryear: Six-Day War Begins (1967)


Six-Day War Begins (1967)

After a period of relative calm, border incidents between Israel and Syria, Egypt, and Jordan increased during the early 1960s. Palestinian guerrilla attacks on Israel from bases in Syria led to increased hostility between the two countries. After Egypt signed a defense treaty with Jordan, Israel launched a preemptive air strike against the three Arab states, capturing the Sinai Peninsula, Gaza Strip, West Bank, Old City of Jerusalem, and the Golan Heights. How many were killed in the fighting? More… Discuss


Georges Bizet — Carmen Suite, Les Toreadors

Israeli rights group claims IDF violated rules of war with Gaza strikes — Info 24 US


Palestinian Christians


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Palestinian Christians are Palestinians who belong to one of a number of Christian denominations in Israel and the Palestinian territories, including Oriental Orthodoxy, Anglican, Eastern Orthodoxy, Catholic (Eastern and Western rites), Protestant, and others. In both the local dialect of Palestinian Arabic and in classical or modern standard Arabic, Christians are called Nasrani (a derivative of the Arabic word for Nazareth, al-Nasira) or Masihi (a derivative of Arabic word Masih, meaning “Messiah“).[1] In Hebrew, they are called Notzri (also spelt Notsri), which means “Nazarene”.

Today, Christians comprise less than 4% of the Palestinian population of Israel and the Palestinian territories – approximately 8% of the Arab population of the West Bank, less than 1% in the Gaza Strip, and nearly 10% of the Arab population in Israel.[2] According to official British Mandatory estimates, Palestine’s Christian population in 1922 comprised 9.5% of the total population (10.8% of the Palestinian population), and 7.9% in 1946.[3] The Palestinian Christian population greatly decreased from 1948 to 1967. A large number fled or were expelled from the area during the 1948 Arab–Israeli War, and a small number left during Jordanian control of the West Bank for economic reasons. Since 1967, the Palestinian Christian population has increased in excess of the continued emigration.[4]

Worldwide, there are nearly one million Palestinian Christians in these territories as well as in the Palestinian diaspora, comprising over 10% of the world’s total Palestinian population. Palestinian Christians live primarily in Arab states surrounding historic Palestine and in the diaspora, particularly in South America, Europe and North America.

Demographics and denominations

In 2009, there were an estimated 50,000 Christians in the Palestinian territories, mostly in the West Bank, with about 3,000 in the Gaza Strip.[5] Of the total Christian population of 154,000 in Israel, about 80% are Arabs, many of whom also self-identify as Palestinian.[5] The majority (56%) of Palestinian Christians live in the Palestinian diaspora.[6]

According to the CIA World Factbook, as of 2013, the population statistics on Palestinian and related Arab-Israeli Christians are as follows:[7][8][9]

Population group Christian population  % Christian
West Bank* 214,000 8
Gaza Strip 12,000 0.7
Arab Christians in Israel** 123,000 10
Non-Arab Christians in Israel 29,000 0.4
Total Arab Christians 349,000 6.0
Total Christians (including non-Arabs) 378,000 3.0
* The figure includes Samaritans and other unspecified minorities.[dubious ]**Arab Christians in Israel do not necessarily identify as Palestinian.

Around 50% of Palestinian Christians belong to the Orthodox Church of Jerusalem, one of the 16 churches of Eastern Orthodoxy. This community has also been known as the Arab Orthodox Christians. There are also Maronites, Melkite-Eastern Catholics, Jacobites, Chaldeans, Roman Catholics (locally known as Latins), Syriac Catholics, Orthodox Copts, Catholic Copts, Armenian Orthodox, Armenian Catholic, Quakers (Friends Society), Methodists, Presbyterians, Anglicans (Episcopal), Lutherans, Evangelicals, Pentecostals, Nazarene, Assemblies of God, Baptists and other Protestants; in addition to small groups of Jehovah’s Witnesses, Mormons and others.

The Orthodox Patriarch of Jerusalem, Theófilos III, is the leader of the Palestinian and Jordanian Orthodox Church of Jerusalem, but Israel has refused to recognize his appointment.[10] If confirmed, he would replace Patriarch Irenaios (in office from 2001), whose status within the church became disputed after a term surrounded by controversy and scandal given that he sold Palestinian property to Israeli Orthodox Jews.[11] Archbishop Theodosios (Hanna) of Sebastia is the highest ranking Palestinian clergyman in the Orthodox Patriarchate of Jerusalem.

The Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem, Fouad Twal, is the leader of the Roman Catholics in Jerusalem, Palestine, Jordan, Israel and Cyprus. The Anglican Bishop in Jerusalem is Suheil Dawani,[12] who replaced Bishop Riah Abou Al Assal. Elias Chacour, a Palestinian refugee, of the Melkite Eastern Catholic Church is Archbishop of Haifa, Acre and the Galilee. Bishop Dr. Munib Younan is the president of the Lutheran World Federation and the Bishop of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Jordan and the Holy Land (ELCJHL).

this pressed: Flash – Egypt slams Israel plan to seize Palestinian land – France 24


The Israeli West Bank settlement of Efrat on September 1, 2014The Israeli West Bank settlement of Efrat on September 1, 2014

The Israeli West Bank settlement of Efrat on September 1, 2014The Israeli West Bank settlement of Efrat on September 1, 2014

Flash – Egypt slams Israel plan to seize Palestinian land – France 24.

Flash – Israel plan to seize West Bank land ‘alarms’ UN’s Ban – France 24


Flash – Israel plan to seize West Bank land ‘alarms’ UN’s Ban – France 24.

Tunnel (according to Farlex) not to be mistaken for other definitions)


Noun 1. tunnel - a passageway through or under something, usually underground (especially one for trains or cars)tunnel a passageway through or under something, usually underground (especially one for trains or cars); “the tunnel reduced congestion at that intersection”

auto, automobile, car, motorcar, machine a motor vehicle with four wheels; usually propelled by an internal combustion engine; “he needs a car to get to work”
 
catacomb an underground tunnel with recesses where bodies were buried (as in ancient Rome)
 
passageway a passage between rooms or between buildings
 
railroad tunnel a tunnel through which the railroad track runs
 
shaft a long vertical passage sunk into the earth, as for a mine or tunnel
 
underpass, subway an underground tunnel or passage enabling pedestrians to cross a road or railway
  2. tunnel - a hole made by an animal, usually for sheltertunnel a hole made by an animal, usually for shelter

hollow, hole a depression hollowed out of solid matter
 
rabbit warren, warren a series of connected underground tunnels occupied by rabbits
Verb 1. tunnel - move through by or as by diggingtunnel move through by or as by digging; “burrow through the forest”

cut into, delve, dig, turn over turn up, loosen, or remove earth; “Dig we must”; “turn over the soil for aeration”
  2. tunnel - force a way throughtunnel force a way through                  

penetrate, perforate pass into or through, often by overcoming resistance; “The bullet penetrated her chest”
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

this pressed: United Nations News Centre – ‘Appalled’ by attack on UN-run school in Gaza, Ban urges halt to all fighting


United Nations News Centre – ‘Appalled’ by attack on UN-run school in Gaza, Ban urges halt to all fighting.

this pressed: Official Vents Outrage at Shelling of U.N. Schools in Gaza – NYTimes.com


Official Vents Outrage at Shelling of U.N. Schools in Gaza – NYTimes.com.

Israeli commandos clash with Hamas gunmen in Gaza raid | Reuters


Israeli commandos clash with Hamas gunmen in Gaza raid | Reuters.

THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: ISRAELI SUBMARINE DAKAR DISAPPEARS WITHOUT A TRACE (1968)


Israeli Submarine Dakar Disappears without a Trace (1968)

Israel bought the INS Dakar from the UK in 1965. The submarine departed for Israel on January 9, 1968, but disappeared en route with its entire crew. An international search mission yielded no answers. Over a year later, a fisherman found the stern emergency buoy marker from the Dakar on the coast of what is now the Gaza Strip, but further searches failed to turn up anything. The exact cause of the submarine’s sinking remains unknown. Where and when was its wreckage finally found? More… Discuss

 

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Christmas comes to the Gaza Strip, despite storm damage and flooding – #Focus



The snow storm that hit the Middle East two weeks ago has affected people from Beirut to Cairo. In the Gaza Strip, thousands have been left unable to return to their homes, as torrential rains and melting snow flooded the streets. Christmas is coming too to some parts of the enclave; of the 1.7 million Gazans, there are 176 Roman Catholics and 1200 Orthodox Christians – fewer than 1% of the population. Our correspondent found out what kind of Christmas they’ll be having this year.
12/24/2013 REPORTS
An in-depth report on a major news issue.
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