Tag Archives: George Eliot

quotation: George Eliot


 

Failure after long perseverance is much grander than never to have a striving good enough to be called a failure.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

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quotation: George Eliot


Perhaps the most delightful friendships are those in which there is much agreement, much disputation, and yet more personal liking.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

quotation: George Eliot


It was not that she was out of temper, but that the world was not equal to the demands of her fine organism.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

quotation: George Eliot (1819-1880)


There is a sort of jealousy which needs very little fire; it is hardly a passion, but a blight bred in the cloudy, damp despondency of uneasy egoism.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

quotation: “I desire no future that will break the ties with the past.” – George Eliot


I desire no future that will break the ties with the past.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

Quotation: Ignorance… is a painless evil; so, I should think, is dirt, considering the merry faces that go along with it. George Eliot


Ignorance… is a painless evil; so, I should think, is dirt, considering the merry faces that go along with it.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

Quotation: Blessed is the man who, having nothing to say, abstains from giving us wordy evidence of the fact. George Eliot


Quotation of the Day

Blessed is the man who, having nothing to say, abstains from giving us wordy evidence of the fact.George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

quotation: The strongest principle of growth lies in human choice. George Eliot


The strongest principle of growth lies in human choice.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

quotation: “Our deeds determine us, as much as we determine our deeds.” George Eliot


Our deeds determine us, as much as we determine our deeds.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

quotation: George Eliot (on the uplifting role of music)


I think I should have no other mortal wants, if I could always have plenty of music. It seems to infuse strength into my limbs and ideas into my brain. Life seems to go on without effort, when I am filled with music.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

QUOTATION: George Eliot


Animals are such agreeable friends – they ask no questions, they pass no criticisms.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: “One must be poor to know the luxury of giving.” (George Eliot)


One must be poor to know the luxury of giving.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: George Eliot


All honor and reverence to the divine beauty of form! Let us cultivate it to the utmost in men, women, and children—in our gardens and in our houses. But let us love that other beauty too, which lies in no secret of proportion, but in the secret of deep human sympathy.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: George Eliot ABOUT A TYRANT


If a man means to be hard, let him keep in his saddle and speak from that height, above the level of pleading eyes, and with the command of a distant horizon.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: George Eliot about conceited people


I’ve never any pity for conceited people, because I think they carry their comfort about with them.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: George Eliot (1819-1880)


It is well known to all experienced minds that our firmest convictions are often dependent on subtle impressions for which words are quite too coarse a medium.

George Eliot (1819-1880)

 

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QUOTATION: George Eliot ON SAFETY


A man will tell you that he has worked in a mine for forty years unhurt by an accident as a reason why he should apprehend no danger, though the roof is beginning to sink.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

 

George Eliot


What do we live for, if it is not to make life less difficult to each other?

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

 

Today’s Birthday: GEORGE ELIOT (1819)


George Eliot (1819)

Eliot, born Mary Ann Evans, was raised with a strong religious piety but broke with orthodoxy in her 20s and turned to fiction, writing such classic Victorian novels asSilas Marner, Daniel Deronda, and Middlemarch, in which she developed a method of psychological analysis that would become a characteristic of modern fiction. Although her novels are serious in tone, they still contain humorous moments. With which philosopher did Eliot have a lengthy, scandalous affair?More… Discuss

 

Quotation: George Eliot


Men’s lives are as thoroughly blended with each other as the air they breathe: evil spreads as necessarily as disease.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

 

Quotation: George Eliot on communicating feelings


Examine your words well, and you will find that even when you have no motive to be false, it is a very hard thing to say the exact truth, even about your own immediate feelings.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

 

Quotation: George Eliot


More helpful than all wisdom is one draught of simple human pity that will not forsake us.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

Quotation George Eliot on about the skill of adaptation


If I got places, sir, it was because I made myself fit for ’em. If you want to slip into a round hole, you must make a ball of yourself.

George Eliot (1819-1880)

Quotation: George Eliot On nature repairs of her ravages (goes for humans too)


Nature repairs her ravages, but not all. The uptorn trees are not rooted again; the parted hills are left scarred; if there is a new growth, the trees are not the same as the old … To the eyes that have dwelt on the past, there is no thorough repair.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

Quotation: George Eliot on “Later Love”


How is it that the poets have said so many fine things about our first love, so few about our later love? Are their first poems their best? Or are not those the best which come from their fuller thought, their larger experience, their deeper-rooted affections?

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

Quotation: George Eliot on human feeling


Human feeling is like the mighty rivers that bless the earth: it does not wait for beauty—it flows with resistless force and brings beauty with it.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

Quotation: George Eliot on Family likeness and differences


Family likeness has often a deep sadness in it. Nature, that great tragic dramatist, knits us together by bone and muscle, and divides us by the subtler web of our brains; blends yearning and repulsion; and ties us by our heart-strings to the beings that jar us at every movement.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

Quotation: George Eliot on love


People who love downy peaches are apt not to think of the stone, and sometimes jar their teeth terribly against it.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

Today’s Birthday: George Eliot (1819-1880) on beginnings and endings


Every limit is a beginning as well as an ending.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

Quotation: George Eliot – a writer-(1819-1880) – on the power of Words


You have such strong words at command, that they make the smallest argument seem formidable.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

Today’s Quotation: Excerpt from Middlemarch -George Eliot on Egotism


Excerpt from Middlemarch -George Eliot on Egotism

Excerpt from Middlemarch -George Eliot on Egotism (click to access Quotations Book)

Today”S Quotation: George Eliot (1819-1880)


I’ve been a great deal happier … since I have given up thinking about what is easy and pleasant, and being discontented because I couldn’t have my own will. Our life is determined for us—and it makes the mind very free when we give up wishing, and only think of bearing what is laid upon us, and doing what is given us to do.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

Today’s Quotation: George Eliot (1819-1880) – on Belonging as link to the past


I desire no future that will break the ties of the past.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

Today’s Quotation: George Eliot on Woman in a patriarchal society


A woman’s heart must be of such a size and no larger, else it must be pressed small, like Chinese feet; her happiness is to be made as cakes are, by a fixed recipe.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

Quotation of the Day: On death


Our dead are never dead to us, until we have forgotten them.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

Quotation of the Day: George Eliot – On Happiness and History


The happiest women, like the happiest nations, have no history.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

Quotation of the Day: George Eliot (1819-1880) – On Consequences


Consequences are unpitying. Our deeds carry their terrible consequences, quite apart from any fluctuations that went before—consequences that are hardly ever confined to ourselves.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

Today’s Quotation: George Eliot (1819-1880)


Don’t let us rejoice in punishment, even when the hand of God alone inflicts it. The best of us are but poor wretches, just saved from shipwreck: can we feel anything but awe and pity when we see a fellow-passenger swallowed by the waves?
(From Scenes of Clerical Life by George Eliot–1858–Book 3–Chapter 22. The story was originally published in 1858 in Blackwood’s Magazine. The first edition of the novel was published in 1910 after she passed away.)
George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

Today’s Quotation: George Eliot – On Truth and Lie


Falsehood is so easy, truth so difficult.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

The above quote comes from “Adam Bede“–Book Two–Chapter XVII–1859. The quote is in the fifth paragraph.

Read the book at: http://www.gutenberg.org/files/507/507-h/507-h.htm#2HCH0017

Find Out more about George Eliot a
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Eliot