Tag Archives: George Enescu

Eminescu, mai aredelean decât îl lasă istoria să fie – Buna Ziua Fagaras (Pe linga plopii fara sot cu Maria Raaducanu si Maxim Belciug)


Joi, 15 ianuarie, se vor împlini 165 de ani de la naşterea poetului şi gazetarului Mihai Eminescu.

Profesorul făgărăşean Ion Funariu a făcut cercetări pe vremea când era dascăl la ,,Radu Negru” şi a scris o carte în care publică informaţii uluitoare despre poet. Se pare că strămoşii lui Mihai Eminescu sunt ardeleni get-beget proveniţi din inima Ţării Făgăraşului, mai exact satul Vad, comuna Şercaia.
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via Eminescu, mai aredelean decât îl lasă istoria să fie – Buna Ziua Fagaras.

Maria Raducanu & Maxim Belciug – Pe langa plopii fara sot (Guilelm Sorban / Mihai Eminescu)

Make Music Part of Your Life Series: David Ohanesian – I Pagliacci – Prologo


[youtube.com/watch?v=rkNNPtQ8aQI]

De la Wikipedia, enciclopedia liberă

David Ohanesian (n. 6 ianuarie 1927, București – d. 30 septembrie 2007, București) a fost un bariton român care, alături de Octav Enigărescu și Nicolae Herlea, a făcut parte din triada de aur a celor mai mari baritoni ai României.

David Ohanesian, foto: Mihai Cosma

În decursul carierei sale artistice a jucat în peste 2.000 de spectacole de operă, interpretând peste 40 de roluri și primind numeroase premii și distincții. A cântat pe marile scene ale lumii, alături de alți mari interpreți ca Luciano Pavarotti, Montserrat Caballe, Placido Domingo, Leontyne Price sau Birgit Nilsson. A rămas memorabilă interpretarea sa în rolul Oedip, din opera cu același nume de George Enescu, care i-a adus renumele de cel mai apreciat Oedip al secolului al XX-lea.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

David Ohanesian (born January 6, 1927, Bucharest – died September 30, 2007, Bucharest) was a Romanian baritone who alongside Octav Enigărescu and Nicholas Herlea, was part of the golden triad of the greatest baritones of Romania.
David Ohanesian, Photo: Mihai Cosma

During his artistic career he played in more than 2,000 opera, playing over 40 roles and received numerous awards and accolades. He played on the great stages of the world, along with other great artists like Luciano Pavarotti, Montserrat Caballe, Placido Domingo, Leontyne Price and Birgit Nilsson. He remained in the role of Oedipus memorable interpretation of the work of the same name by George Enescu, who earned the reputation of Oedipus appreciated the twentieth century.

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Enescu – Sonata for Cello and Piano No. 1 in F minor, Op. 26


[youtube.com/watch?v=qdGh5UqbbuA]

Make Music Part of Your Life Series: 
Enescu – Sonata for Cello and Piano No. 1 in F minor, Op. 26 (1898)

[1] Allegro molto moderato
[2] Allegretto scherzando 14:30
[3] Molto andante 22:09
[4] Presto 34:16

Andrei Csaba (cello)
Dan Grigore (piano)

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Great Compositions/Performances: Georges Enesco: Roumanian Rhapsody #1 in A Op 11, Sergiu Celibidache conducting


[youtube.com/watch?v=4TDCMoou2Uc]
Georges Enesco: Roumanian Rhapsody #1 in A Op 11
George Enescu – Rapsodia Romana nr.1
Sergiu Celibidache conducting
This is THE perfect one ! No other conductor/orchestra makes me feel it and live it like this.

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Great Compositions/Performances: George Enescu – Romanian Rhapsody n° 2 in D major, Op. 11 (Orchestre de Montbéliard, Paul Staïcu)



The first Romanian Rhapsody composed at 19 years (together with a second one, both bearing the opus number 11) gained a worldwide fame for its lovely folk tunes (in fact, all Enescu’s works are imbued with such folk lightmotifs) and vivid Romanian rhythms, becoming definitely the best known of all his compositions. Here the Rhapsody No.2 is performed with an infectious empathy by the Romanian conductor Paul Staïcu along with his outstanding musicians of Montbéliard Philharmonic Orchestra.  The performance reveals a mighty symphonist with a keen sense of colours and orchestral textures, a rigorous and honest one devoted to principles and truth, extracting the sap of his composition from folk melodies of his people.  The reputed conductor Paul Staïcu has signed a series of recordings devoted to the complete orchestral oeuvres of his fellow compatriot.  The celebrated Romanian Rhapsody in D major op.11 , more reflexive than its pair no.1, the second Romanian Rhapsody is also a youthful work (written in 1900, when the composer was 19) with persistent folk aromas and picturesque suggestions, aiming at fructifying the popular Romanian musical treasure and meditative side of its sentimentality. The rhapsodic character compounds its appeal and favours its reception by audiences. It is a composition putting grave questions and depicting outrageous realities, filtered through a sensitive conscience. It conveys the sufferance of a moral man facing the immorality of a corrupt and pointless world, reflecting on duties and faiths, on life’s sense and destiny. The torturing mood is magisterially recreated by the inspired baton of Paul Staïcu, the main themes flow unceasingly with a desolating vigour and reach finally a concluding climax affirming an undefeated hope in the majesty of mankind.

  

The Romanian Athenaeum, at about the time of the Rhapsodies’ premiere there in 1903

The two Romanian Rhapsodies, Op. 11, for orchestra, are George Enescu‘s best-known compositions. They were both written in 1901, and first performed together in 1903. The two rhapsodies, and particularly the first, have long held a permanent place in the repertory of every major orchestra. They employ elements of lăutărească music, vivid Romanian rhythms, and an air of spontaneity. They exhibit exotic modal coloring, with some scales having ‘mobile’ thirds, sixths or sevenths, creating a shifting major/minor atmosphere, one of the characteristics of Romanian lăutărească music.[1][not in citation given] They also incorporate some material found in the later drafts of his Poème roumaine, Op. 1.[2]

File:Ateneul Român stage.jpg

The stage of the Athenaeum in Bucharest

The two Romanian Rhapsodies were composed in Paris, and premiered together in a concert at the Romanian Athenaeumin Bucharest which also included the world premiere of Enescu’s First Suite for Orchestra, Op. 9 (1903). The composer conducted all three of his own works, which were preceded on the programme by Berlioz’s Overture to Les francs-jugesand Schumann’s Symphony No. 1, both conducted by Eduard Wachmann. The concert took place on 23 February 1903[3](according to the Julian calendar in use in Romania at that time; 8 March 1903 Gregorian).[4] The Second Rhapsody was played first, and Enescu maintained this order of performance throughout his life.[5]

Rhapsody No. 2 in D major

The Second Rhapsody, like the first, was completed in 1901,[14][7] but is more inward and reflective. Its essential character is not dance, but song.[15][5] It is based on the popular 19th-century ballad “Pe o stîncă neagră, într-un vechi castel” (“On a dark rock, in an old castle”) which, like the opening melody of the First Rhapsody Enescu may have learned from the lăutar Chioru,[1] though again there is some doubt whether Enescu actually remembered it from Chioru.[10] After a development culminating in a canonic presentation, this theme is joined by a dance tune, “Sîrba lui Pompieru” (“Sîrba of the Fireman”), followed shortly afterward by the second half of a folksong, “Văleu, lupu mă mănîncă” (“Aiee, I’m being devoured by a wolf!”), which is treated in canon.[16] Toward the end there is a brief moment of animation, bringing to mind the spirit of country lăutari, but the work ends quietly.[17]

Unlike the First Rhapsody, there is no controversy at all about the scoring of the Second, which is given in the published score as: 3 flutes, 2 oboes, cor anglais, 2 clarinets in A, 2 bassoons, 4 horns, 2 trumpets in C, 3 trombones, 2 timpani, cymbal, 2 harps, first violins, second violins, violas, cellos, and double basses.[18]

 

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Ansamblul LAUTARII din Chisinau: Rapsodia Romana si melodii lui Grigoras Dinicu



Musique du monde: Roumanie.
Pot-pourri de mélodies de Grigoras Dinicu (compositeur et violoniste roumain 1889-1949) et de George Enescu (compositeur de nombeuses oeuvres d’inspiration folkloriques dont Rapsodia Romana, 1881-1955) interprétés avec brio et grandes virtuosités par l’ensemble Lautarii de Chisinau (République de Moldavie), dirigé par Nicolae Botgros.

Bucharest City Tour



Masterminds.ro & Yony_Ro presents you the capital of Romania as you never seen it before! 

Video by: Masterminds.ro
http://www.masterminds.ro
Photos by: yony_ro
http://www.flickr.com/photos/40873435…
Music by: George Enescu 
(Romanian Rhapsody no. 1)

A High Definition video which will make you see how Bucharest really is! You will feel the real Romanian passion for art, culture and life itself!
Bring closer a glass of red wine, turn the sound volume just a bit higher than normal.. now relax and enjoy the following 10 minutes..

 

Fabulous Compositions: Romanian Rhapsody No. 1 by George Enescu



The author of this beautiful video has chosen a ever so truthful account of  the country and the people of Romania, now and throughout the ages old history, for which am very thankful:

“Pentru mine, Enescu va rămâne una din veritabilele minuni ale lumii.
(…) Rădăcinile puternice şi nobleţea sufletului său sunt provenite din
propria lui ţară, o ţară de inegalată frumuseţe.” Yehudi Menuhin

Just a thought:  “Yehudi Menuhin’s quotation refers to the best known, and loved Romanian poet Mihai Eminescu:  Nevertheless, I believe that George Enescu achieved in his Romanian Rhapsodies a portrayal of the people of Romania that no one else ever was able to describe with so much humanity, in the language of music what Eminescu did by employing the romantic poetry of the  Romanian language.” George-B 

http://www.flickr.com/photos/gaspars/…

Jules Massenet … Thais: Meditation


Jules Massenet … Thais: Meditation

Budapest Philharmonic Orchestra
Jules Massenet 1842 – 1912 …….. Massenet took a break from his composing to serve as a soldier in the Franco-Prussian War, but returned to his art following the end of the conflict in 1871. From 1878 he worked as professor of composition at the Paris Conservatory where his pupils included André Bloch, Gustave Charpentier, Ernest Chausson, Reynaldo Hahn, Georges Enesco, and Charles Koechlin. His greatest successes were Manon in 1884, Werther in 1892, and Thaïs in 1894. Notable later operas were Le jongleur de Notre-Dame, produced in 1902, and Don Quichotte, produced in Monte Carlo 1910, with the legendary Russian bass Feodor Chaliapin in the title-role.

 

Patricia Kopatchinskaja – George Enescu Violin Sonata No.3, Op.25


 

Ceaikovski – Liturghia Sfantului Ioan Gura de Aur (O cugetare: “Un adevar neimpartasit traieste precum o minciuna: in ascuns si apasa ca o povara pe umerii constintei si clipa de clipa greutatea ei devine mai mare!)



Corul Filarmonicii “George Enescu” Ceaikovski – Liturghia Sfantului Ioan Gura de Aur (Tchaikovsky liturgy of st john chrysostom op 41)
Dirijor Iosif Ion Prunner

O cugetare: “Un adevar neimpartasit traieste precum o minciuna: in ascuns si apasa ca o povara pe umerii constintei si clipa de clipa greutatea ei devine mai mare si mai greu de carat)

-George-B

Ciocarlia- George Enescu


Ciocarlia- George Enescu
violin- Claudiu Hontila
oboe- Dan Gadea
viola- Sorin Gherbanovschi
cello- Gyula Ortenszki

George Enescu – Poema Româna, Op.21.



Op.1 – Moderato – Adagio – Allegro vivo – Adagio – Moderato – Presto

George Enescu- Rapsodia I: De pe la mine, pe la voi! Apoi ca-asta-i ritmul Nici prea repede, nu prea usor, doar usurel



ARMY IN CONCERT (30 martie 2010) – Sala Radio,Bucuresti Romania; dirijor Tiberiu Oprea

Romania in Imagini (Images from Romania)



Fotografii cu obiective turistice din Romania (cetati, pesteri, biserici, manastiri, etc.). Toate imaginile sunt preluate de pehttp://www.fotoromania.net. In film apar:

– Cimitirul vesel din Sapanta, judetul Maramures
– Coloanele de bazalt de la Racos, judetul Brasov
– Pestera Ursilor, judetul Bihor
– Memorialul victimelor comunismului de la Sighet, judetul Maramures
– Biserica Domneasca din Curtea de Arges, judetul Arges
– Poiana Narciselor de la Vad, judetul Brasov
– Transalpina (DN67C), Muntii Parang
– Piata Sfatului din Brasov, judetul Brasov
– Pestera Muierilor, judetul Gorj
– Manastirea Barsana, judetul Maramures
– Cetatea taraneasca din Jimbor, judetul Brasov
– Muntii Piatra Craiului
– Turnul Alb din Brasov, judetul Brasov
– Schitul Ostrov din Calimanesti, judetul Valcea
– Biserica fortificata din Cisnadioara, judetul Sibiu
– Fortificatiile Brasovului, judetul Brasov
– Manastirea Cozia, judetul Valcea
– Biserica Neagra din Brasov, judetul Brasov
– Manastirea Horezu, judetul Valcea
– Cetatea Taraneasca din Rasnov, judetul Brasov
– Biserica domneasca si Turnul Chindiei din Targoviste, judetul Dambovita
Vulcanii noroiosi din Berca, judetul Buzau

With the music of George Enescu:   The Rumanian Rhapsody Op. 11/1

 

“Chorale “Jesu Bleibet meine Freude” (from Cantata 147, BWV 147) (arr. Hess)


Find out more about Dinu Lipatti      here

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
Dinu Lipatti

Dinu Lipatti
Background information
Born 19 March 1917
BucharestRomania Romania
Died 2 December 1950 (aged 33)
GenevaSwitzerland Switzerland
Genres Classical Music
Occupations PianistComposer
Labels EMI
Associated acts Member of the Romanian Academy
Notable instruments
piano

Dinu Lipatti (Romanian pronunciation: [ˈdinu liˈpati]; 1 April [O.S. 19 March] 1917 – 2 December 1950) was a Romanian classical pianist and composerwhose career was cut short by his death from Hodgkin’s disease at age 33. He was elected posthumously to the Romanian Academy.

Lipatti was born in Bucharest into a musical family: his father was a violinist who had studied with Pablo de Sarasate and Carl Flesch,[1] his mother a pianist. For his baptism, which occurred not shortly after birth as is usual, but when he was old enough to play the piano, the violinist and composer George Enescu agreed to be his godfather. Lipatti played a minuet by Mozart at his own baptism.[1] He studied at the Gheorghe Lazăr High School, while undergoing piano and composition studies with Mihail Jora for three years. He then attended the Bucharest Conservatoire, studying under Florica Musicescu, who also taught him privately.[1] In June 1930, the best pupils at the Conservatoire gave a concert at the Bucharest Opera, and the 13-year old Lipatti received a huge ovation for his performance of the Grieg Piano Concerto in A minor.[1] In 1932 he won prizes for his compositions: a Piano Sonatina, and a Sonatina for Violin and Piano. That year he also won a Grand Prize for his symphonic suite Les Tziganes.[1] 
More

Celibidache conducts Enescu’s Romanian Rhapsody No.1 in A


Sergiu Celibidache conducding the BucharestGeorge EnescuPhilharmonic Orchestra in his homeland, 1978″

Excerpts from Wikipedia Article in translation: “Symphonic miniatures are based on folklore (mainly urban) and type present a medley of songs grouping with sequences developer. Their exotic nature, dynamic, melodic beauty, spectacular orchestration have made these songs come quickly repertory orchestras and be interpreted in concert or in records discrografice by most major conductors of the world.” 

Bucharest, Romania: Ateneu Român

Image via Wikipedia

George Enescu – Rapsodia Romana (op.2)



Romanian Rhapsody No. 2 in D major

The Second Rhapsody, like the first, was completed in 1901,[16][8] but is more inward and reflective. Its essential character is not dance, but song.[17][5] It is based on the popular 19th-century 

Carmen Sylva si George Enescu

Image by sylvaregina via Flickr

ballad “Pe o stîncă neagră, într-un vechi castel” (“On a dark rock, in an old castle”) which, like the opening melody of the First Rhapsody Enescu may have learned from the lăutar Chioru,[1], though again there is some doubt whether Enescu actually remembered it from Chioru,[12] and is about certain heroic episodes recounted in ancient Moldavian chronicles and characterized by a spirit of poetic rumination.[citation needed] After a development culminating in a canonic presentation, this theme is joined by a dance tune, “Sîrba lui Pompieru” (“Sîrba of the Fireman”), followed shortly afterward by the second half of a folksong, “Văleu, lupu mă mănîncă” (“Aiee, I’m being devoured by a wolf!”), which is treated in canon.[18] Toward the end there is a brief moment of animation, bringing to mind the spirit of country lăutari, but the work ends quietly.[9]

Unlike the First Rhapsody, there is no controversy at all about the scoring of the Second, which is given in the published score as: 3 flutes, 2 oboes, cor anglais, 2 clarinets in A, 2 bassoons, 4 horns, 2 trumpets in C, 3 trombones, 2 timpani, cymbal, 2 harps, first violins, second violins, violas, cellos, and double basses.
( Source:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romanian_Rhapsodies_(Enescu)

George Enescu was born in the village of Liveni, Romania (Dorohoi County at the time, today Botoşani County), and showed musical talent from early in his childhood. A child prodigy, Enescu created his first musical composition at the age of five. Shortly thereafter, his father presented him to the professor and composer Eduard Caudella. At the age of seven, entered the Vienna Conservatory, where he studied with Joseph Hellmesberger, Jr., Robert Fuchs, and Sigismond Bachrich, and graduated before his 13th birthday, earning the silver medal. In his Viennese concerts young Enescu played works by Brahms, Sarasate and Mendelssohn. In 1895 he went to Paris to continue his studies. He studied violin with Martin Pierre Marsick, harmony with André Gédalge, and composition with Jules Massenet and Gabriel Fauré.

Many of Enescu’s works were influenced by Romanian folk music, his most popular compositions being the two Romanian Rhapsodies (1901–2), the opera Oedipe (1936), and the suites for orchestra. He also wrote five symphonies (two of them unfinished), a symphonic poem Vox maris, and much chamber music (three sonatas for violin and piano, two for cello and piano, a piano trio, quartets with and without piano, a wind decet (French, “dixtuor”), an octet for strings, a piano quintet, a chamber symphony for twelve solo instruments).
In 1923 he made his debut as a conductor in a concert given by the Philadelphia Orchestra in New York City. In 1935, he conducted the Orchestre Symphonique de Paris and Yehudi Menuhin in Mozart’s Violin Concerto No.3 in G major. He also conducted the New York Philharmonic between 1937 and 1938. In 1939 he married Maria Rosetti (known as the Princess Cantacuzino through her first husband Mihail Cantacuzino), a good friend of the future Queen Marie of Romania. While staying in Bucharest, Enescu lived in the Cantacuzino Palace on Calea Victoriei (now the Muzeu Naţional George Enescu, dedicated to his work).

He lived in Paris and in Romania, but after World War II and the Soviet occupation of Romania, he remained in Paris.

He was also a noted violin teacher. Yehudi Menuhin, Christian Ferras, Ivry Gitlis, Arthur Grumiaux, and Ida Haendel were among his pupils. He promoted contemporary Romanian music, playing works of Constantin Silvestri, Mihail Jora, Ionel Perlea and Marţian Negrea.

On his death in 1955, George Enescu was interred in the Père Lachaise Cemetery in Paris.

MUMA LUI STEFAN CEL MARE de Dimitrie Bolintineanu

I
Pe o stanca neagra, intr-un vechi castel, Unde cura-n poale un rau mititel, Plange si suspina tanara domnita, Dulce si suava ca o garofita; Caci in batalie sotul ei dorit A plecat cu oastea si n-a mai venit. Ochii sai albastri ard in lacrimele Cum lucesc in roua doua viorele; Buclele-i de aur cad pe albu-i san,
Rozele si crinii pe fata-i se-ngan. insa doamna soacra langa ea vegheaza Si cu dulci cuvinte o imbarbateaza.
II
Un orologiu suna noaptea jumatate, in castel in poarta oare cine bate?
— “Eu sunt, buna maica, fiul tau dorit; Eu, si de la oaste ma intorc ranit. Soarta noastra fuse cruda asta data: Mica mea ostire fuge sfaramata.
Dar deschideti poarta… Turcii ma-nconjor… Vantul sufla rece… Ranile ma dor!” Tanara domnita la fereastra sare.
— “Ce faci tu, copila?” zice doamna mare. Apoi ea la poarta atunci a iesit
Si-n tacerea noptii astfel i-a vorbit:
— “Ce spui tu, straine? Stefan e departe; Bratul sau prin taberi mii de morti imparte. Eu sunt a sa muma; el e fiul meu;
De esti tu acela, nu-ti sunt muma eu! insa daca cerul, vrand sa-ngreuieze Anii vietii mele si sa ma-ntristeze, Nobilul tau suflet astfel l-a schimbat; Daca tu esti Stefan cu adevarat, Apoi tu aice fara biruinta Nu poti ca sa intri cu a mea vointa. Du-te la ostire! Pentru tara mori! Si-ti va fi mormantul coronat cu flori!”
III
Stefan se intoarce si din cornu-i suna; Oastea lui zdrobita de prin vai aduna. Lupta iar incepe… Dusmanii zdrobiti Cad ca niste spice, de securi loviti.

Autor: Dimitrie Bolintineanu
Poezia MUMA LUI STEFAN CEL MARE de Dimitrie Bolintineanu