Tag Archives: Germany

today’s holiday: Kinderzeche


Kinderzeche is a festival in Dinkelsbühl, Bavaria, Germany, to honor the children who saved the town during the Thirty Years’ War of 1618-48. In 1632, according to legend, as Swedish troops rode into town, a small band of children appeared before the commander and asked for his mercy. The commander’s heart softened, and he spared the town. The celebration today is a reenactment of the event, with participants in costumes of 17th-century town councilors and soldiers. Highlights of the festival include the parade of the Dinkelsbühl Boys’ Band and a performance of a sword dance. More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Lindenfest


A 600-year-old linden tree in Geisenheim, Germany, is the center of this annual festival celebrating the new wine. As the oldest town in the Rhineland region, Geisenheim is renowned for its vineyards, and during the Linden Tree Festival people come from all over the world to taste the wine, visit the vineyards, and make pilgrimages to Marienthal, a Franciscan shrine in a nearby wooded valley. The ancient linden tree is decorated with lights for the three-day festival, and folk dancing and feasting take place beneath its branches. More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Frost Saints’ Days

Frost Saints’ Days

These three consecutive days in May mark the feasts of St. Mammertus, St. Pancras, and St. Servatus. In the wine-growing districts of France, a severe cold spell occasionally strikes at this time of year, inflicting serious damage on the grapevines; some in rural France have believed that it is the result of their having offended one of the three saints, who for this reason are called the “frost saints.” French farmers have been known to show their displeasure over a cold snap at this time of year by flogging the statues and defacing the pictures of Mammertus, Pancras, and Servatus. More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Victory Day (1945)

Victory Day (1945)

Still celebrated in most of the Soviet successor states, Victory Day marks Nazi Germany‘s capitulation to the USSR in WWII. Signed on the evening of May 8, 1945—May 9 in Moscow’s time zone—the surrender followed Germany’s initial capitulation to the Allies. When the first surrender document was being signed, only one Soviet representative was present, and he had no instructions from Moscow nor any means of immediate contact with Soviet leaders. Was he punished or lauded for deciding to sign it? More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Kaspar Hauser (1812)

Kaspar Hauser (1812)

In 1828, a teenage boy appeared in Nuremberg, Germany, carrying a letter that stated he had been placed in the care of the anonymous author as an infant. This caretaker claimed to have taught the boy reading, writing, and religion but never let him leave the house. The boy barely spoke but confirmed that he had been kept in a dark prison hole. In the following years, he sustained several mysterious injuries, and he was fatally stabbed in 1833. Who is thought to have been behind his death? More… Discuss

Most Facebook content censored 1 India 2 Turkey 3 Pakistan 4 Germany 5 Russia — Conrad Hackett

today’s birthday: Mark Spitz (1950)

Mark Spitz (1950)

During the 1972 Summer Olympic Games in Munich, Germany, Jewish-American swimmer Mark Spitz shot to sporting fame when he captured seven gold medals, a feat unequaled by any other athlete in a single Olympiad until 2008. Spitz also set new world records for each of the events in which he took the gold. Having thus brought his total Olympic medal count up to 11—he had won two gold, one silver, and one bronze in 1968—Spitz retired from competition. What other historic event marked the 1972 Games? More… Discuss

Access Mark Spitz’s official website    HERE

Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

February 6

1626   Huguenot rebels and the French sign the Peace of La Rochelle.
1778   France recognizes the United States and signs a treaty of aid in Paris.
1788   Massachusetts becomes the sixth state to ratify the Constitution.
1862   The Battle of Fort Henry, Tenn., begins the Mississippi Valley campaign.
1891   The Dalton Gang commits its first crime, a train robbery in Alila, Calif.
1899   The Spanish-American War ends.
1900   President McKinley appoints W.H. Taft commissioner to report on the Philippines.
1904   Japan’s foreign minister severs all ties with Russia, citing delaying tactics in negotiations over Manchuria.
1916   Germany admits full liability for Lusitania incident and recognizes the United State’s right to claim indemnity.
1922   The Washington Disarmament Conference comes to an end with signature of final treaty forbidding fortification of the Aleutian Islands for 14 years.
1926   Mussolini warns Germany to stop agitation in Tyrol.
1929   Germany accepts Kellogg-Briand pact.
1933   Adolf Hitler’s Third Reich begins press censorship.
1936   Adolf Hitler opens the Fourth Winter Olympics.
1941   The RAF clears the way as British take Benghazi, trapping thousands of Italians.
1944   Kwajalein Island in the Central Pacific falls to U.S. Army troops.
1945   MacArthur reports the fall of Manila, and the liberation of 5,000 prisoners.
1963   The United States reports that all Soviet offensive arms are out of Cuba.
1964   Cuba blocks the water supply to Guantanamo Naval Base in rebuke of the United State’s seizure of four Cuban fishing boats.
1964   Paris and London agree to build a rail tunnel under the English Channel.
1965   Seven U.S. GIs are killed in a Viet Cong raid on a base in Pleiku.
1968   Charles de Gaulle opens the 19th Winter Olympics in France.
1975   President Gerald Ford asks Congress for $497 million in aid to Cambodia.
1977   Queen Elizabeth marks her Silver Jubilee.
1982   Civil rights workers begin a march from Carrolton to Montgomery, Alabama.
Born on February 6
1756   Aaron Burr, 3rd U.S. Vice President.
1895   George Herman “Babe” Ruth, baseball player with the Boston Red Sox, the New York Yankees and the Boston Braves. The first player to hit 60 home runs in one season.
1911   Ronald Reagan, film actor and 40th U.S. President (1981-1989).
1913   Mary Douglas Leakey, archaeologist and paleoanthropologist.
1932   Francois Truffaut, French film director (The 400 Blows, Shoot the Piano Player).
1933   Walter E. Fountroy, politician and civil rights leader.
1940   Tom Brokaw, NBC News anchorman.
1945   Bob Marley, reggae musician.

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/today-in-history#sthash.0sRMZjpc.dpuf

today’s birthday: Hugo Junkers (1859)

Hugo Junkers (1859)

Junkers was a pioneering German engineer who held many patents for his original developments in the fields of gas engine and aircraft design. He had innovative ideas about metal airplanes and flying wings, and he put them to the test—somewhat ironically, as he was purportedly a pacifist—developing warplanes for World War I. In the lead-up to World War II, the Nazis stripped Junkers of control of his company and sentenced him to house arrest. He died soon after. What was the “Sheetmetal Donkey”? More… Discuss

picture of the day: Adolf Hitler Becomes Chancellor

Adolf Hitler Becomes Chancellor

German President Paul von Hindenburg (right) made Adolf Hitler chancellor on January 30, 1933. After World War I, Germany fell into disarray and looked for a leader to strengthen it again. Hitler had emerged after joining the Nazi Party in 1919 and taking it over in 1921. In 1932 Hitler ran against von Hindenburg and lost–but not by a wide margin. The Nazis won 230 seats in the German parliament and continued to gain influence, stifling democracy and communism by force and by making laws against them. After Hindenburg’s death in 1934, Hitler proclaimed himself Der Führer of the Third Reich and continued as Germany’s leader through World War II.

Image: Collier’s Magazine

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.UOuYX7Ws.dpuf

Leonard Cohen – Take This Waltz [Official Music Video], great songs/interpretations

Leonard Cohen – Take This Waltz [Official Music Video]




news: Swiss Government Slices International Pizza Delivery (or: when the Swiss order a pizza)

Swiss Government Slices International Pizza Delivery

Don’t like your neighborhood pizzeria? Maybe it’s time to consider international pizza delivery—a tactic used until recently by many Swiss citizens trying to stretch their francs by ordering pizza from nearby German border towns, where it’s less expensive. An exception had allowed food delivery to avoid passing through customs, but it was rescinded by Swiss officials about a year ago. Although the Chamber of Industry and Commerce for the neighboring German region of Hochrhein-Bodensee lobbied for the exception to be reinstated, the Swiss customs office recently rejected the proposal. More… Discuss

this pressed: Suspected member of Islamic State group arrested in Germany-info24.us

Suspected member of Islamic State group arrested in Germany

By Info on January 11, 2015 News

BERLIN – German prosecutors say they have arrested a suspected member of the Islamic State group.

The federal prosecutor’s office said in a statement late Saturday that a 24-year-old man identified as Nils D. was arrested in Dinslaken in western Germany and his apartment was raided.

The suspect allegedly traveled to Syria in October in 2013 where he joined IS fighters. He returned to Germany in November 2014.

A local prosecutor in Duesseldorf had opened a separate terror investigation against the man in early 2014, but federal prosecutors said there was no indication that he was planning any concrete attacks. They also said his arrest was not related to the terror attacks in Paris.

via Suspected member of Islamic State group arrested in Germany.

Robot Flies the Friendly Skies

Robot Flies the Friendly Skies

The next time you take a flight, you may want to check that the passenger next you is human. Last week, Athena, a humanoid robot, took what was hailed as the first flight by a robot as a paying passenger on a commercial airline. Built by an American robotics company, Athena was accompanied on her flight from Los Angeles to Germany by researchers from the Max Planck Society, who are exploring the potential for robots to do life-threatening jobs, such as cleaning up nuclear waste. The flight served no scientific purpose, but Athena’s handlers said buying a seat was cheaper than stowing the robot as cargo. More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Pope Leo X (1475)

Pope Leo X (1475)

Leo X, born into the important Florentine Medici family, rose to the papacy in 1513. He was a patron of the arts and a generous almsgiver, but he was also strongly criticized for his lavish lifestyle. He was not greatly interested in the advancement of the Church, and when Martin Luther nailed his 95 Theses to the church door at Wittenberg, Leo X’s subsequent excommunication of Luther did little to stem the tide of the Reformation. What massive animal did he keep as a pet? More… Discuss

Today’s holiday: St. Barbara’s Day

St. Barbara’s Day

Scholars doubt that St. Barbara existed as more than a legend that emerged during the 2nd century. In parts of France, Germany, and Syria, St. Barbara’s Day is considered the beginning of the Christmas season. In southern France, it is customary to set out dishes holding grains of wheat soaked in water on sunny window sills. If the “St. Barbara’s grain” grows quickly, it means a good year for crops. There is a similar custom in Germany and the Czech and Slovak republics with cherry branches. In Syria, St. Barbara’s Day is for feasting and bringing food to the poor. More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Nuremberg Trials Begin (1945)

Nuremberg Trials Begin (1945)

The Nuremberg Trials, which took place in Germany between 1945 and 1949, were a series of trials prosecuting Nazi officials for their participation in World War II and the Holocaust. The first and most famous of these trials, the Trial of the Major War Criminals before the International Military Tribunal, involved 24 of the most important leaders of Nazi Germany, 12 of whom were sentenced to death for crimes against humanity and other offenses. How were the death sentences carried out? More… Discuss

let’s not forget: Smallpox (1908). Eradicated thanks to marvels of vaccinations — Lindsey Fitzharris (@DrLindseyFitz)

Saint of the Day for Saturday, November 15th, 2014: St. Albert the Great

October 29, 1875 in History Born:
Marie, queen consort of Ferdinand I of Romania, 1914-27

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Princess Marie of Edinburgh, more commonly known as Marie of Romania (Marie Alexandra Victoria; 29 October 1875 – 18 July 1938),[note 1] was the last Queen consort of Romania as the wife of King Ferdinand I.

Born into the British royal family, she was titled Princess Marie of Edinburgh at birth. Her parents were Prince Alfred, Duke of Edinburgh and Grand Duchess Maria Alexandrovna of Russia. Marie’s early years were spent in Kent, Malta and Coburg. After refusing a proposal from her cousin, the future King George V, she was chosen as the future wife of Crown Prince Ferdinand of Romania, the heir apparent of King Carol I, in 1892. Marie was Crown Princess between 1893 and 1914, and became immediately popular with the Romanian people.

Marie visiting a military hospital, 1917


Marie had controlled her weak-willed husband even before his ascension in 1914, prompting a Canadian newspaper to state that “few royal consorts have wielded greater influence than did Queen Marie during the reign of her husband”.[2]

After the outbreak of World War I, Marie urged Ferdinand to ally himself with the Triple Entente and declare war on Germany, which he eventually did in 1916. During the early stages of fighting, Bucharest was occupied by the Central Powers and Marie, Ferdinand and their five children took refuge in Moldavia. There, she and her three daughters acted as nurses in military hospitals, caring for soldiers who were wounded or afflicted by cholera. On 1 December 1918, the province of Transylvania, following Bessarabia and Bukovina, united with the Old Kingdom. Marie, now Queen consort of Greater Romania, attended the Paris Peace Conference of 1919, where she campaigned for international recognition of the enlarged Romania. In 1922, she and Ferdinand were crowned in a specially-built cathedral in the ancient city of Alba Iulia, in an elaborate ceremony which mirrored their status as queen and king of a united state.

1882 portrait by John Everett Millais commissioned by Queen Victoria and exhibited at the Royal Academy.[9]

1882 portrait by John Everett Millais commissioned by Queen Victoria and exhibited at the Royal Academy.[9]

<<< 1882 portrait by John Everett Millais commissioned by Queen Victoria and exhibited at the Royal Academy.[9]

1882 portrait by John Everett Millais commissioned by Queen Victoria and exhibited at the Royal Academy.[9]

1882 portrait by John Everett Millais commissioned by Queen Victoria and exhibited at the Royal Academy.[9]

As queen, she was very popular, both in Romania and abroad. In 1926, Marie and two of her children undertook a diplomatic tour of the United States. They were received enthusiastically by the people and visited several cities before returning to Romania. There, Marie found that Ferdinand was gravely ill and he died a few months later. Now queen dowager, Marie refused to be part of the regency council which reigned over the country under the minority of her grandson, King Michael. In 1930, Marie’s eldest son Carol, who had waived his rights to succession, deposed his son and usurped the throne, becoming King Carol II. He removed Marie from the political scene and strived to crush her popularity. As a result, Marie moved away from Bucharest and spent the rest of her life either in the countryside, or at her home by the Black Sea. In 1937, she became ill with cirrhosis and died the following year.

Following Romania’s transition to a Socialist Republic, the monarchy was excoriated by communist officials. Several biographies of the royal family described Marie either as a drunkard or as a promiscuous woman, referring to her many alleged affairs and to orgies she had supposedly organised before and during the war. In the years preceding the Romanian Revolution of 1989, Marie’s popularity recovered and she was offered as a model of patriotism to the population. Marie is primarily remembered for her work as a nurse, but is also known for her extensive writing, including her critically acclaimed autobiography.

Queen Mary of Romania 2.jpg

Marie wearing her regalia. Photograph by George Grantham Bain.
Queen consort of Romania
Reign 10 October 1914 – 20 July 1927
Coronation 15 October 1922
Spouse Ferdinand I, King of Romania
Full name
Marie Alexandra Victoria
House House of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (by birth)
House of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen (by marriage)
Father Prince Alfred, Duke of Edinburgh
Mother Maria Alexandrovna of Russia
Born 29 October 1875
Eastwell Park, Kent, England
Died 18 July 1938 (aged 62)
Pelișor Castle, Sinaia, Romania
Burial 24 July 1938[1]
Curtea de Argeș Cathedral

Read more >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>HERE

this pressed: German banknotes being used as wallpaper at the height of Weimar hyperinflation, 1923 — OnThisDay & Facts

“We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals” — Immanuel Kant— ✍ Bibliophilia

What I like most about elephants is that they don’t play mind games… (no, not those elephants though) —George-B

Bayreuth Festival

Bayreuth Festival

Bayreuth, Germany, is home to this annual festival devoted to the performance of operas by Richard Wagner. Wagner launched the festival in 1876 to showcase a variety of German music and did not intend for his compositions to be the focus. The event was plagued by financial problems in its early years, but survived through state intervention and the support of influential Wagnerians, including Ludwig II of Bavaria and Adolf Hitler. Who did Hitler beg—unsuccessfully—to lead the festival? More… Discuss

News: Norway Best Country for Older People

Norway Best Country for Older People

Growing old is never easy, but for some it is easier than others, and where they live has a lot to do with it. An index evaluating the quality of life of older adults in 96 countries around the globe has ranked Norway the best country in the world for older people, followed closely by Sweden, Switzerland, Canada, and Germany. Australia, Western Europe, and North America also rank high on the list. The index weighs factors such as income security, health, personal capability, and whether the elderly live in an “enabling environment.” More… Discuss

Story: Brandenburg Gate

Brandenburg Gate

The Brandenburg Gate is the last surviving town gate of Berlin, Germany. When completed in 1791, the lavish gate greeted visitors to the boulevard that led directly to the Prussian palace. Architect Carl G. Langhans modeled the gate after the Propylea, the gateway to the Acropolis in Athens. On top was the “Quadriga of Victory,” a statue of a chariot drawn by four horses. Heavily damaged in World War II, the gate was restored in 1957. Why was it closed in 1961, and when did it reopen? More… Discuss

Felix Mendelssohn – Piano Concerto in A Minor (13 year old Mendelssohn): make music part of your life series

Felix Mendelssohn – Piano Concerto in A Minor (13 year old Mendelssohn)

this day in the yesteryear: Two Plus Four Agreement Signed in Moscow (1990)

Two Plus Four Agreement Signed in Moscow (1990)

The Two Plus Four Agreement, also known as the Treaty on the Final Settlement With Respect to Germany, was the final peace treaty negotiated between West Germany and East Germany—the “Two”—and the four powers that occupied Germany at the end of World War II: France, the UK, the US, and the Soviet Union. The treaty paved the way for the German reunification, which took place less than a month later, on October 3. What rights did the four powers renounce under the treaty’s terms? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: First V-2 Rocket Hits London (1944)

First V-2 Rocket Hits London (1944)

Developed by Germany during World War II, the Vergeltungswaffe 2 (V-2) rocket was the world’s first modern ballistic missile and the first known manmade object to enter outer space. Thousands were launched on Allied targets during the last year of the war, causing more than 9,000 deaths. One of the rocket’s first targets was London, which was hit just days after Hitler declared his plans to start V-2 attacks. To what did the British government initially attribute the resulting explosion? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: The Munich Massacre (1972)

The Munich Massacre (1972)

During the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich, Germany, Palestinian terrorists from the group Black September infiltrated the Olympic Village and took a number of members of the Israeli Olympic team hostage. Two of the athletes were killed during the initial assault, and nine others lost their lives in the course of a failed rescue attempt, during which a German police officer and five of the eight kidnappers were killed as well. What went wrong during the rescue attempt at Fürstenfeldbruck airbase? More… Discuss

Triumph of Death (El triunfo de la muerte) Psalter. Germany (S., Augsburg?), 1st half of the 16th century: Bibliophilia (@Libroantiguo) August 22, 2014

today’s birthday: Mata Hari (1876)

Mata Hari (1876)

Born Margaretha Geertruida Zelle, this Dutch courtesan, dancer, and alleged spy went by the stage name Mata Hari. During World War I, she had intimate relationships with high-ranking Allied military officers and government officials. Though details are unclear, she apparently spied for Germany from 1916. In January 1917, French intelligence intercepted German messages about a spy they identified as Mata Hari, and she was executed by the French on espionage charges. What happened to her corpse?

Mendelssohn – String Quartet No. 1, Op. 12: make music part of your life series

Mendelssohn – String Quartet No. 1, Op. 12

Felix Mendelssohn-Bartoldy

String Quartet No.1, Op.12 (1829)

1. Adagio non troppo – Allegro non tardante
2. Canzonetta – Allegretto (7:42)
3. Andante espressivo (11:48)
4. Molto allegro e vivace (15:23)

Melos Quartet

Julius Rietz (1812–1877)

Publisher Info.:
Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdys Werke, Serie 6.
Leipzig: Breitkopf & Härtel, 1875. Plate M.B. 22.

Mineola: Dover Publications

this day in the yesteryear: Adolf Hitler Publishes First Volume of Mein Kampf (1925)

Adolf Hitler Publishes First Volume of Mein Kampf (1925)

Hitler dictated his manifesto, whose title means “my struggle,” while serving a prison term for treason. The book, filled with anti-Semitic outpourings, political ideology, and strategy for world domination, became the bible of National Socialism. By the end of WWII, about 10 million copies of the book had been sold or distributed in Germany—owing much to the fact that every newlywed couple and every soldier at the battlefront received a free copy. Where is it illegal to sell copies of the book? More… Discuss

make music part of your life sereis: Felix Mendelssohn – Piano Concerto in A Minor (13 year old Mendelssohn)

Felix Mendelssohn – Piano Concerto in A Minor (13 year old Mendelssohn)

Jakob Ludwig Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy (German born, and generally known in English-speaking countries, as Felix Mendelssohn (3 February 1809 — 4 November 1847) was a German composer, pianist, organist and conductor of the early Romantic period.

Piano Concerto in A Minor (1822)

1. Allegro
2. Adagio (13:32)
3. Finale: Allegro ma non troppo (22:10)

***Cyprien Katsarsis piano and the Franz Liszt Chamber Orchestra conducted by Janos Rolla

***Paintings and drawings by Felix Mendelssohn (except his images and his wife’s)

today’s holiday: Kiel Week

Kiel Week

Kiel Week is an international sailing regatta in Kiel, Germany, in the last week of June, at which the world’s leading yachters compete. Craft of all sorts—sail, motor, and muscle-powered—race on the waters of the Kiel Fjord. Kiel Week began in 1882 with 20 yachts; today there are well over 1,000 yachts competing in three classes of races—international, Olympic, and offshore regattas—as well as more than 1,000 events ranging from talks by international political leaders to art exhibits, theater, and music. More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Neville Chamberlain Becomes Prime Minister of England (1937)

Neville Chamberlain Becomes Prime Minister of England (1937)

Chamberlain served as prime minister of the UK from 1937 to 1940. His political legacy is defined by his controversial policy of “appeasement” toward Adolf Hitler, exemplified by the Munich Pact that allowed Hitler to annex the Sudetenland in 1938. Once Hitler annexed the rest of Czechoslovakia and invaded Poland in 1939, Chamberlain led Britain to war. However, he was forced to resign eight months later, following the failed British campaign in Norway. How much longer did Chamberlain live? More… Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta


Joachim von Ribbentrop (1893)

Ribbentrop was Nazi Germany’s foreign minister from 1938 until 1945, during which time he helped negotiate the German-Soviet Nonaggression Pact of 1939, which set the stage for Germany‘s attack on Poland that touched off World War II. He, like so many other Nazi officials, was an active participant in the “Final Solution” and various other atrocities and was one of the few who paid with his life at Nuremberg, where he was tried, convicted, and hanged for his war crimes. What were his last words? More…Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta


Blood on Handkerchief Likely Not Royal

A handkerchief long thought to be stained with the blood of guillotined French King Louis XVI is likely inauthentic. DNA analysis of the blood on the cloth suggests it most likely belonged to a brown-eyed, average-height person, whereas the king had blue eyes and was quite tall for his time. The genetics also point to French and Italian lineage, while many of Louis XVI’s ancestors came from Germany and Poland. Why then was the handkerchief stored in an elaborately decorated gourd bearing the inscription, “On January 21, Maximilien Bourdaloue dipped his handkerchief in the blood of Louis XVI after his decapitation”? One theory is that a fraudster created the fake relic for money. More… Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

Fabulous Compositions: Antonín Dvořák – Humoresque No. 7, Op. 101

Conductor: Jiři Stárek
Orchestra: SWR Rundfunkorchester Kaiserslautern

Enhanced by Zemanta


“British Bang” on German Archipelago (1947)

Heligoland is a pair of small German islands located in the North Sea, comprising the main island and the smaller island of Düne. The main island is commonly divided into three geographic sections, the last of which came into being in 1947, when the British Royal Navy detonated 6,700 tonnes of explosives on the island, actually changing its shape. The so-called British Bang was one of the largest non-nuclear single detonations in history. Why did the British bomb the island? More… Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

Great Compositions/Performances: Beethoven Sonata No. 8 in C minor, Op. 13 “Pathétique” Live – Valentina Lisitsa

Great Compositions/Performances: Beethoven Sonata No. 8 in C minor Op. 13 “Pathétique” Live – Lisitsa

Special for my German fans! List of info for upcoming concerts in Deutschland in the next couple of weeks below . Munchen (Mar24), Stuttgart(Mar27), Heidelberg(Apr 7)
Do come ! For Beethoven and more :-)))

Enhanced by Zemanta


Helmut Kohl (1930)

Kohl was chancellor of West Germany from 1982 until 1990, when he became the first chancellor of a reunified Germany, serving in that capacity until 1998. The conservative chairman of the Christian Democratic Union (CDU) led his party to two convincing victories in West Germany in the 1980s. During his administration, West Germany prospered and became increasingly influential in world affairs. Kohl’s reputation was severely tarnished by what financial scandal that came to light in 1999? More…Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

MAX ERNST (1891)

Max Ernst (1891)

Having served in World War I, German-born French painter and sculptor Max Ernst at first gravitated toward the Dada movement, but the former student of psychology and philosophy eventually became one of the founders of surrealism. Apart from the medium of collage, for which he is well known, Ernst developed other devices to express his fantastic vision, like frottage, in which a drawing tool is rubbed over paper laid on a textured surface, and grattage, a technique consisting of what? More… Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta


Daylight Saving Time Adopted as Law in the US (1918)

Daylight saving time (DST) is the system of advancing clocks forward one hour near the start of spring to increase “usable” hours of daylight in the afternoon. Though Benjamin Franklin proposed the idea in 1784, DST was not widely adopted until World War I. It was first used in Western European countries like Germany and England, and Newfoundland became one of the first North American jurisdictions to adopt DST in 1917. The US followed suit a year later. Which two US states do not observe DST? More… Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

Great Compositions/Performances: Valentina Lisitsa plays Beethoven’s Sonata No. 8 in C minor Op. 13 “Pathétique” Live –

From Valentina:  “FSpecial for my German fans! List of info for upcoming concerts in Deutschland in the next couple of weeks below . Munchen (Mar24), Stuttgart(Mar27), Heidelberg(Apr 7)
Do come ! For Beethoven and more :-)))

Enhanced by Zemanta


Zarah Leander (1907)

Leander was a Swedish actress and singer. As a contracted performer with Germany‘s principal film studio, Leander made a number of successful films that contributed to the Third Reich‘s propaganda. Though Leander did not take part in official Nazi party functions, her association with Nazism caused her to be shunned in Sweden after the war. She resumed acting but never regained the popularity she had enjoyed before. Why did Nazi Propaganda Minister Joseph Goebbels dub her an “Enemy of Germany”? More… Discuss


Enhanced by Zemanta


Anschluss: German Troops Occupy Austria (1938)

Though the union of Austria and Germany was forbidden by the Treaty of Saint-Germain in 1919, the Nazis annexed Austria in 1938. The German term Anschluss—”annexation“—is most frequently used in reference to this event. When the Nazis entered Austria to enforce the Anschluss, they encountered no military opposition and quickly took control. The US, USSR, and UK signed a declaration proclaiming the Anschluss null and void in 1943, yet Austria did not regain its sovereignty until what year? More…Discuss


Enhanced by Zemanta


The Goseck Circle

Hailed as “the German Stonehenge,” the Goseck circle is a Neolithic structure in Goseck, Germany. It is the oldest such structure known today, built about 7,000 years ago—and pre-dating Stonehenge by almost 2,000 years. Rediscovered during an aerial survey in 1991, the site consists of a circular ditch 246 feet (75 m) across surrounding two concentric palisade rings with gates in spots aligned with the sunrise and sunset on the winter solstice. When was the Goseck Circle re-opened to the public? More… Discuss


Enhanced by Zemanta

Great Compositions/Performances: .ERNEST ROZSA PLAYS 1995 HAYDN-TRIO “ZIGEUNER-TRIO” HOB 15/25

1995 in “Rathaus” City of Marl, Germany, Live Concert in the Concert Auditorium, Rainer Klaas, Piano, Catalin Ilea, Cello
Ernest Rozsa plays Massenet “Meditation” 1978 Roumanian State Radio Broadcast Tirgu-Mures Marosvasarhely Neumarkt


1983 Ernest Rozsa was Concertmaster of the Philharmonia Hungarica e. V. BRD Germany, Miklos Bence was Solo-Contrabassist in the 
Philharmonia Hungarica e. V. BRD Germany
Biography: Ernest Rozsa was Professor on the Music Pedagocial Liceum in Tirgu-Mures, Roumania, from 1975-1982
He was Soloist of the State Philharmonic Orchestra Tirgu-Mures in Roumania from 1975-1981
He performed from 1973-1981 many concert as soloist with this orchestra in Roumania with Conductors like Szalman Lorant, C. Mandeal and others, the Violinconcertos by Brahms, Beethoven, Bartok (Nr. 2), Sibelius, Mozart, Tchaikowsky, Tchaikowsky-Trio, Shostakovitch. There was also Productions Recordings in the State Roumanian Radio-Broadcast of the City of Tirgu-Mures in Roumania from 1973 until 1981.
He was in the same orchestra also Associate Concertmaster in foreign countries tours.
Ernest Rozsa was Concertmaster of the “Philharmonia Hungarica in Marl, Germany”, one of the major orchestras in Germany until the year of 1999, when this orchestra has been finished by th German Government. 
He performed also by the WDR3 The German Broadcast Company for Classical Music together with his son, Ernoe Rozsa 
(www.ernoe-rozsa-violin.com) works by Bottesini Grand Duo Concertant (with Benze Miklos Contrabass), his son (at this time Ernoe Rozsa was 13 years old) Ernoe Rozsa recorded at this time Pugnani-Kreisler Introduction and Allegro, Pablo de Sarasate “Caprice Basque”, Dimitrescu “Dans Taranesc”.
Since 1999 Ernest Rozsa is retired and living in Germany.
His son, Ernoe Rozsa, is active violin soloist in Japan, Ernoe Rozsa recorded the original Versions of the Violinconcertos Nr. 3 E-Major and Nr. 4 d-minor by Niccolo Paganini by the Label of NAXOS, Hong Kong. Ernoe Rozsa performing his own cadenzas on both Paganini Violinconcertos. Ernest Rozsa was first violin teacher of his son Ernoe Rozsa, and later his son studied by Prof. Tibor Varga, Prof. Rosa Fain, Sir Georg Solti, and Lord Yehudi Menuhin. Ernoe Rozsa was also soloist in a series of concerts with Lord Yehudi Menuhin (conductor), Ernoe Rozsa played the Mozart Violinconcerto Nr. 3 G-Major with the “Rhainland-Pfaelzische Philharomie Ludwigshafen-Mannheim”, Germany, and Lord Yehudi Menuhin was the conductor of this 5 concerts. The greatest concert was in the “Alte Oper Frankfurt” in 1990, in germany, where Ernoe Rozsa performed as soloist with Mozarts Violinconcerto Nr. 3 G-major and Lord Menuhin was conductor of this concerts.


Enhanced by Zemanta

Great Performances: Carl. Maria von. Weber – Concerto No.1, in F minor, Op.73 (Sabine Meyer)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Carl Maria von Weber wrote his Clarinet Concerto No. 1 in F minor, Op. 73 (J. 114) for the clarinettist Heinrich Bärmann in 1811. The piece is considered a gem in the instrument’s repertoire. It is written for clarinet in B♭. The work consists of three movements in the form of fast, slow, fast.


  1. Allegro in F minor modulating into A-flat major and later returning to F minor with a meter of 3/4
  2. Adagio ma non troppo in C major transforming into C minor and E flat major and afterward reverting to C major with a meter of 4/4
  3. RondoAllegretto in F major with a meter of 2/4


Scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 bassoons, 3 horns, 2 trumpetstimpanistrings, and solo clarinet

Carl Maria von Weber

Carl Maria Friedrich Ernst von Weber (18 or 19 November 1786 – 5 June 1826[1]) was a Germancomposerconductorpianistguitarist[2] and critic, one of the first significant composers of the Romanticschool.

Weber’s operas Der FreischützEuryanthe and Oberon greatly influenced the development of the Romantic opera in Germany. Der Freischütz came to be regarded as the first German “nationalist” opera,Euryanthe developed the Leitmotif technique to a hitherto-unprecedented degree, while Oberon may have influenced Mendelssohn‘s music for A Midsummer Night’s Dream and, at the same time, revealed Weber’s lifelong interest in the music of non-Western cultures. This interest was first manifested in Weber’sincidental music for Schiller‘s translation of Gozzi‘s Turandot, for which he used a Chinese melody, making him the first Western composer to use an Asian tune that was not of the pseudo-Turkish kind popularized by Mozart and others.

A brilliant pianist himself, Weber composed four sonatas, two concertos and the Konzertstück (Concert Piece) in F minor, which influenced composers such as ChopinLiszt and Mendelssohn. The Konzertstückprovided a new model for the one-movement concerto in several contrasting sections (such as Liszt’s, who often played the work), and was acknowledged by Stravinsky as the model for his Capriccio for Piano and Orchestra. Weber’s shorter piano pieces, such as the Invitation to the Dance, were later orchestrated byBerlioz, while his Polacca Brillante was later set for piano and orchestra by Liszt.

Weber compositions for woodwind instruments occupy an important place in the musical repertoire. His compositions for the clarinet, which include two concertos, a concertino, a quintet, a duo concertante, and variations on a theme (posthumously), are regularly performed today. His Concertino for Horn and Orchestra requires the performer to simultaneously produce two notes by humming while playing—a technique known as “multiphonics“. His bassoon concerto and the Andante e Rondo ungarese (a reworking of a piece originally for viola and orchestra) are also popular with bassoonists.

Weber’s contribution to vocal and choral music is also significant. His body of Catholic religious music was highly popular in 19th-century Germany, and he composed one of the earliest song cycles, Die Temperamente beim Verluste der Geliebten ([Four] Temperaments on the Loss of a Lover). Weber was also notable as one of the first conductors to conduct without a piano or violin.

Weber’s orchestration has also been highly praised and emulated by later generations of composers – Berlioz referred to him several times in hisTreatise on Instrumentation while Debussy remarked that the sound of the Weber orchestra was obtained through the scrutiny of the soul of each instrument.

His operas influenced the work of later opera composers, especially in Germany, such as MarschnerMeyerbeer and Wagner, as well as several nationalist 19th-century composers such as Glinka. Homage has been paid to Weber by 20th-century composers such as Debussy, Stravinsky,Mahler (who completed Weber’s unfinished comic opera Die drei Pintos and made revisions of Euryanthe and Oberon) and Hindemith (composer of the popular Symphonic Metamorphosis of Themes by Carl Maria von Weber).

Weber also wrote music journalism and was interested in folksong, and learned lithography to engrave his own works.


Enhanced by Zemanta