Tag Archives: Germany

THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: THE TWENTY-ONE DEMANDS (1915)


The Twenty-One Demands (1915)

Japan gained a large sphere of interest in northern China through its victories in the First Sino-Japanese War and the Russo-Japanese War, thus joining the ranks of the European imperialist powers scrambling to establish control over China. Japan used its 1914 declaration of war against Germany as grounds for invading German holdings in China. Then, ignoring the Chinese request to withdraw, Japan secretly presented the Chinese president with an ultimatum. What were some of the demands? More… Discuss

 

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NEWS: COCAINE SMUGGLERS GO BANANAS


Cocaine Smugglers Go Bananas

Drug traffickers in Germany are having a very, very bad week. They managed to lose about 8.2 million dollars (6 million euros) worth of cocaine as a result of what appears to have been a “logistical error.” The drugs were smuggled into the country from Colombia in a shipment of bananas, but somehow the smugglers failed to retrieve their stash before the fruit was delivered to supermarkets. When employees at five Berlin shops went to unpack the banana cartons, they got an unexpected surprise in the form of 309 lb (140 kg) of cocaine. The drugs are now in the hands of the authorities.More… Discuss

 

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ARTICLE: THE GLAUBERG


The Glauberg

The presence of ancient ruins on the Glauberg plateau in Hesse, Germany, had long been attributed to the Romans, until the 1906 discovery of a torc—a metal necklace—which pointed to a Celtic influence. The Glauberg is one of a network of fortified sites found in parts of Germany. In 1988, a historian flying overhead discovered tumuli—mounds of earth protecting tombs—that were revealed to contain warriors’ remains and weapons. Perhaps the most significant discovery, though, was a statue of whom? More… Discuss

 

This Day in the Yesteryear: THE SUBSEQUENT NUREMBERG TRIALS: DOCTORS’ TRIAL BEGINS (1946)


The Subsequent Nuremberg Trials: Doctors’ Trial Begins (1946)

The Doctors’ Trial was the first of 12 post-World War II trials collectively called the “Subsequent Nuremberg Trials,” which the US held in its occupation zone in Nuremberg, Germany. Of the 23 defendants, 20 were medical doctors, and they faced charges for war crimes that included experimenting on human subjects without their consent. The Nuremberg Code was thus established to protect the rights of humans participating in medical research. How many of the defendants received death sentencesMore… Discuss

 

Today’s Birthday: JOHANN ECK (1486)


Johann Eck (1486)

Eck, a German Catholic theologian, was initially friendly with Martin Luther but did not hesitate to condemn Luther’s 95 Theses—which criticized papal policy—as heretical. Known for his dialectic skill, he publicly confronted Luther in 1519, and then went to Rome and returned with a papal bull condemning Luther. From then on, he was a leader in the struggle against the reforming party in Germany. How did the students of Leipzig, the site of Eck’s confrontation with Luther, react to the bull? More… Discuss

 

News: TROVE OF NAZI-LOOTED ART FOUND IN MUNCH MAN’S APARTMENT


Trove of Nazi-Looted Art Found in Munch Man’s Apartment

A cache of 1,500 works of art looted by the Nazis has been found in the apartment of a Munich, Germany, recluse being investigated for tax evasion. The man in question is the son of an art dealer who worked hand in hand with the Nazis during World War II. Valued at about one billion euros ($1.35 billion), this may well be one of the largest recoveries of Nazi-looted art, yet it represents only a small fraction of what was taken. Authorities discovered the trove in 2011, but news of the find is only emerging now. More… Discuss

 

GERMANY RECOGNIZES THIRD GENDER


Germany Recognizes Third Gender

Germany has become the first European country to legally recognize a third sex—indeterminate. Parents there may now leave the gender box blank on their children’s birth certificates, a move aimed to meet the needs of those babies born with both male and female or ambiguous sex characteristics or genetics. Until now, parents of intersexchildren had to make rapid decisions not just about which gender to put down on the birth certificates but also whether to take surgical steps to match the infants‘ physical appearances to the selected gender. Experts now believe that this sort of sex assignment early in life can have negative psychological consequences down the line. More…

 

J. S. Bach : Cantata — BWV 68 “Also hat Gott die Welt geliebt” (Karl Richter)



Johann Sebastian Bach (1685 – 1750)
“Also hat Gott die Welt geliebt”
(God so loved the world)
BWV 68
Event:
Cantata for Whit Monday [2nd Day of Pentecost]
Readings: 
Epistle: Acts 10: 42-48; Gospel: John 3: 16-21
Composed:
Leipzig, 1725
1st performance: May 21, 1725 – Leipzig

Text:
Christiane Mariane von Ziegler (Mvts. 2-4); Salomo Liscow (Mvt. 1); John 3: 18 (Mvt. 5)
Scoring:
Soloists: Soprano, Bass; 4-part Chorus
Orchestra: 3 trumpets, 3 trombones, 2 oboes, taille, horn, 2 violins, violoncello piccolo, viola, continuo
Mvt. 1: Chorus — Chorale (00:00)
Mvt. 2: Aria (05:31)
Mvt. 3: Recitative (09:41)
Mvt. 4: Aria (10:39)
Mvt. 5: Chorus (15:08)
Soprano: Edith Mathis
Bass: Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau

Oboe (I/II): Manfred Clement and Robert Eliscú
Englischhorn: Andreas Scwinn
Horn: Christoph Brandt
Violin: Ingo Sinnhoffer
Violincello: Fritz Kiskalt

Münchener Bach-Chor / Münchener Bach-Orchester
Conductor – Karl Richter

May 1974; Jan 1975, at Herkules-Saal, München, Germany.

 

Beethoven Sonata Op 106 “Hammerklavier” Part 1 Valentina Lisitsa



Recording in Hannover Germany
Beethoven Sonata Op 106 “Hammerklavier” Part 1 Valentina Lisitsa

 

Today’s Birthday: HANNAH ARENDT (1906)


Hannah Arendt (1906)

Jewish political philosopher Hannah Arendt fled Germany for France and then the US following Hitler’s rise to power in 1933. Her reputation as a scholar and writer was firmly established with the publication of The Origins of Totalitarianism, which linked Nazism and Communism to 19th-century imperialism and anti-Semitism. Her next major publication, The Human Condition, likewise received wide acclaim. What controversial concept did she put forth in her Eichmann in JerusalemMore… Discuss

 

Delius Caprice and Elegy Julian Lloyd Webber and Eric Fenby



Delius Caprice and Elegy performed by Julian Lloyd Webber and Eric Fenby with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra. The recording won a Gramophone Award.

 

This Day in the Yesteryear: SIEMENS & HALSKE TELEGRAPH CONSTRUCTION COMPANY IS FOUNDED (1847)


Siemens & Halske Telegraph Construction Company Is Founded (1847)

Siemens AG is Europe’s largest engineering conglomerate. It was originally founded to build telegraph installations, but under Werner Siemens and his three brothers, it expanded to produce cables, telephones, electric power, and electric lighting. The company built the first long-distance telegraph line in Europe, followed by the monumental Indo-European telegraph line that stretched from Calcutta, India, to London, England. What scandal tainted the company’s reputation in the 1940s? More…Discuss

 

This Day in the Yesteryear: GERMANY, ITALY, AND JAPAN SIGN TRIPARTITE PACT (1940)


Germany, Italy, and Japan Sign Tripartite Pact (1940)

The World War II alliance of Germany, Italy, and Japan was fully realized in September 1940, with the signing of the Tripartite Pact. The agreement called for the Axis Powers to come to each other’s aid if attacked by a nation not already involved in the European War or the Sino-Japanese Conflict and to assist one another in their efforts to “establish and maintain a new order of things”—Germany and Italy in Europe and Japan in Greater East Asia. How did the treaty get the nickname “Roberto”? More…Discuss

 

Valentina has uploaded a new video: Beethoven “Moonlight” Sonata op 27 # 2 Mov 3 Valentina Lisitsa



Recording in Beethovensaal, Hannover Germany, Dec 2009. Wilhelm Kempff recorded Beethoven cycle in the very same hall.
Buy Moonlight Sonata DVD http://www.amazon.co.uk/Live-Royal-Al…

Valentina Lisitsa Live at the Royal Albert Hall
US iTunes – http://bit.ly/iTunesUSVal 
US Amazon – http://bit.ly/ValRAH

 

Today’s Birthday: WALTER ROBERT DORNBERGER (1895)


Walter Robert Dornberger (1895)

A German artillery officer during World War I, Dornberger was captured and spent two years in a French prisoner-of-war camp. After his release, he studied engineering, and, beginning in 1932, directed construction of the V-2 rocket, the forerunner of all post-war spacecraft. Along with other German scientists, Dornberger was brought to the US as part of Operation Paperclip and worked as an advisor on guided missiles for the US Air Force. He became a key consultant on what major American venture? More… Discuss

 

Bernstein Beethoven Leonore Overture Nº3



Leonore Overture Nº 3 in C major, Op. 72b

The Amnesty International Concert

Orchestra: Bavarian Broadcast Symphony Orchestra
Venue: Munich, Germany.
Date: 17/10/1976

Ludwig van Beethoven (1770 – 1827)
Leonard Bernstein (1918 – 1990)

 

This Day in the Yesteryear: THE GLEIWITZ INCIDENT (1939)


The Gleiwitz Incident (1939)

In 1939, Nazi forces staged an attack on a German radio station. They shot a well-known Polish sympathizer and planted his body at the scene, reporting the attack as the work of Polish saboteurs. The attack was part of a Nazi propaganda campaign called Operation Himmler, which involved a series of staged incidents intended to create the appearance of Polish aggression against Germany and provide a basis for the invasion of Poland. What did the Nazis broadcast from the radio station? More… Discuss

 

From ProPublica: Why NSA Snooping Is Bigger Deal in Germany (“Germany lacks the long tradition of strong individual freedoms the state has guaranteed in the U.S. for more than 200 years. Precisely because of that, these values, imported from the Western allies after 1945, are not taken for granted.”)


From ProPublica-_-Why NSA Snooping Is Bigger Deal in Germany

From ProPublica-_-Why NSA Snooping Is Bigger Deal in Germany (click to access the website)

EXCERPTS FROM THE REPORT: 

Now there is a James-Bond vibe to pre-election season: Newspapers publishextensive guides on how to encrypt emails. People question whether they should still use U.S.-based social networks. The German government seems to be under more pressure over the revelations than the American one.

“What makes Germans so sensitive about their data? Many have pointed to Germany’s history: Both the Nazi secret police Gestapo and the East German Stasi spied extensively on citizens, encouraging snitching among neighbors and acquiring private communication.

But that’s not the whole story. Politics and the media in Germany today are dominated by (male) citizens raised in the democratic West who have no personal recollection of either of the Stasi or Gestapo.

Germany lacks the long tradition of strong individual freedoms the state has guaranteed in the U.S. for more than 200 years. Precisely because of that, these values, imported from the Western allies after 1945, are not taken for granted.”

Today’s Birthday: Saint Teresa Benedicta of the Cross – Edith Stein (1891)


Edith Stein (1891)

Born into an observant Jewish family, Stein converted to Christianity in 1922. After studying philosophy, she became a nun in 1934. She moved from Germany to the Netherlands to avoid Nazi persecution, but in 1942 she was arrested because of her Jewish heritage. She was sent to the Auschwitz concentration camp and died in the gas chamber that year. She was canonized by Pope John Paul II in 1998, and is also known as Saint Teresa Benedicta of the Cross. With what miracles is Stein credited? More… Discuss

This Day in History: First Oktoberfest Held in Munich, Germany (1810)


First Oktoberfest Held in Munich, Germany (1810)

The first Oktoberfest was held as a horse race celebrating the wedding of Crown Prince Ludwig of Bavaria to Princess Therese von Saxony-Hildburghausen. In the years that followed, the race was combined with the state agricultural fair, and food and drink were offered. Since that time the 16-day festival has become, above all else, a celebration of German beer, drawing more than five million attendees annually. How many millions of liters of beer did Oktoberfest attendees consume in 2007? More… Discuss

Today’s Birthday: Wenceslaus III of Bohemia (1289)


Wenceslaus III of Bohemia (1289)

Wenceslaus III was king of Bohemia and of Hungary. Unable to assert his authority in Hungary, even with the help of his father, Wenceslaus II, he relinquished his claim to Duke Otto of Bavaria in 1305. He attempted to assert his hereditary claim to the Polish crown but was assassinated while marching to Poland. After an interregnum, John of Luxemburg, who married Wenceslaus’s sister, was elected king of Bohemia. Wenceslaus III was the last member of what dynasty? More… Discuss

Johann Sebastian Bach – Toccata and Fugue in D minor (BWV 565) with Karl Richter



Karl Richter performs Bach’s Toccata and Fugue in D minor (BWV 565) on the Organ of the Basilika in Ottobeuren

Ottobeuren Abbey has one of the richest music programs in Bavaria, with concerts every Saturday. Most concerts feature one or more of the Abbey’s famous organs. The old organ, the masterpiece of French organbuilder Karl Joseph Riepp (1710–75), is actually a double organ; it is one of the most treasured historic organs in Europe. It was the main instrument for 200 years, until 1957 when a third organ was added by G. F. Steinmeyer & Co, renovated and augmented in 2002 by Johannes Klais, making 100 stops available on five manuals (or keyboards).
(Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ottobeuren_Abbey)

Karl Richter (15 October 1926 – 15 February 1981) was a German conductor, organist, and harpsichordist. He was born in Plauen and studied first in Dresden, where he was a member of the Dresdner Kreuzchor and later in Leipzig, where he received his degree in 1949. He studied with Günther Ramin, Carl Straube and Rudolf Mauersberger. In the same year, he became organist at St. Thomas Church, Leipzig, where Johann Sebastian Bach once held the position as Musical Director. In 1951, he moved to Munich, where he taught at the conservatory and was cantor and organist at St. Mark’s Church. He also conducted the Münchener Bach-Chor starting in 1954 and the Münchener Bach-Orchester. In the 1960s and 1970s, he did a great deal of recording and undertook tours to Japan, the United States, Canada, Latin-America, Eastern Europe including the Soviet Union.

He conducted a wide range of music (sacred music from Heinrich Schütz to Max Reger, as well as the symphonic and concerto repertoire of the Classical and Romantic period, including Bruckner symphonies) but is best remembered today for his interpretations of Johann Sebastian Bach‘s and Händel‘s music. Karl Richter avoided the fluctuations in tempo that were then characteristic of the prevailing Romantic manner of conducting Bach, but did not incorporate period instruments and performing techniques into his performances, innovations in Baroque performance practice which had not yet fully blossomed during Richter’s career.

As well as a conductor, Karl Richter is also remembered as an excellent organist. His performances of Bach’s organ pieces are known for their imposing registrations and favorable pace.

While staying in a hotel in Munich in 1981, Karl Richter died from a heart attack. He was buried in the Enzenbühl cemetery in Zurich 8 days later.

Although both of them are of German heritage, Karl Richter has no family relationship with the renowned Russian pianist Sviatoslav Richter. (Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karl_Richter_(conductor)

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Today’s Birthday: Gustav Holst – Saturn from “The Planets Suite” London Symphony Orchestra conducted by Richard Hickox


Gustav Holst was born on 21 September 1874 in Cheltenham, England, the first of two children to Adolph and Clara von Holst.

Adolph was an accomplished pianist who taught piano and practiced many hours during the day, much to the neglect of his wife, Clara, and their two children. Adolph’s family was of Swedish origin. One of his ancestors served as a court composer in Russia until he fell out of favor and exiled to Germany. Soon afterwards, the family emigrated to England. Holst’s mother, Clara, was a piano student of Adolph when first they met. Clara’s great – great grandmother was from Spain, where she had been an actress. She was soon married to an Irishman and moved to Ireland. Clara was sweet, gentle and unassuming but she was not very strong. She died soon after the birth of her second child, when Gustav was only eight.  (Continue reading at: http://www.gustavholst.info/biography/index.php?chapter=1)

This Day in History: Germany Invades Poland (1939)


Germany Invades Poland (1939)

After staging Polish attacks on German forces to create the appearance of Polish aggression, Germany invaded Poland, beginning WWII. Britain and France declared war on Germany two days later, and all the members of the Commonwealth of Nations, with the exception of Ireland, rapidly followed suit. The German blitzkrieg crushed the Polish defenses. Within a month all of Poland was occupied by German forces as well as the forces of what state with whom Germany had just signed a non-aggression pact? More… Discuss

This Day in History: The signing of the Weimar Constitution


Weimar Constitution Signed into Law (1919)

Written immediately after World War I, the Weimar Constitution was the document that governed the short-lived Weimar Republic of Germany. It declared the nation a federal republic governed by a president and parliament and was a strong attempt to establish a liberal democracy in Germany. However, it was adopted during a time of civil conflict and failed with the ascent of the Nazi Party in 1933. How did Hitler manage to subvert the Weimar Constitution after he came to power? More… Discuss

Today’s Birthday: Paul Julius Freiherr von Reuter (1816)


Paul Julius Freiherr von Reuter (1816)

Reuter, founder of the Reuters news agency, was a pioneer of telegraphy and news reporting. In 1849, he started a post service to bridge the gap in a telegraph line between Germany and Belgium. He soon moved to England and opened a telegraph office serving banks, brokerages, and businesses. He steadily extended his commercial news service, acquiring his first subscribing newspaper client in 1858. Undersea cables enabled him to expand the service. What animal was used to deliver messages in 1849? More… Discuss

One of the First Major Outbreaks of St. John’s Dance (1374)


One of the First Major Outbreaks of St. John’s Dance (1374)

Germany was the site of one of the first outbreaks of dancing mania, a phenomenon seen primarily in mainland Europe between the 14th and 17th centuries. During such outbreaks, groups of up to thousands of people would dance uncontrollably, screaming, shouting, and claiming to have visions until they collapsed from exhaustion. Initially considered a curse sent by a saint, usually St. John the Baptist, it was called “St. John’s Dance.” To what do researchers now attribute the strange behavior? More… Discuss

Nuclear Power and Our Future


 

Gemany nuclear Power Decision in Energy Policy


My take on this:

‘It appear that Germany‘s government learned 100% more from the Fukushima nuclear meltdown, that Japan‘s: An example of learning from others’ experiences, and acting without prejudice, enlightened, selflessly – that”s Germany of course. It goes on to show that some cannot give up their ways, no matter how destructive, even to themselves. It also shows the power of the citizen in making decisions, where decision making cannot be accomplished. I guess it helps to keep politicians accountable.
It is true that plans are just plans, that may never materialize, but al least the intension to commit to reason, to change, to search for a better, superior, civilized way, are their, for history.©’

Today’s Birthday: Petrus Canisius (1521)


 

Saint Peter Canisius: Confessor and Doctor Of The Church

Petrus Canisius (1521)

Canisius was a 16th century Jesuit preacher who fought against the spread of Protestantism in Germany, Austria, Bohemia, and Switzerland. His catechism, Summa Doctrinae Christianae, authorized in 1566, was one of the earliest popular expositions of the faith. The reestablishment of Roman Catholicism in Germany after the Reformation was largely due to his zeal, and he was canonized and declared a Doctor of the Church in 1925. What line is he credited with adding to the Hail Mary prayer? More… Discuss

This Day In History: The Illuminati (1776)


Founding of the Illuminati (1776)

The Illuminati were members of a rationalistic society founded in Germany by Adam Weishaupt. Having close affinities with the Freemasons and seemingly organized on a Masonic plan, the group was briefly very popular among German rationalists but had limited influence. The Roman Catholic Church, which Weishaupt left in his youth and rejoined before his death, condemned the Illuminati. In 1785, the Bavarian government dissolved the organization. What conspiracy theories involve the Illuminati? More… Discuss

Today’s Birthday: Princess Louise, Duchess of Argyll (1848)


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Princess Louise, Duchess of Argyll (1848)

In 1840, Queen Victoria married her first cousin, Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, and the two had nine children, whose marriages, and those of their grandchildren, in turn, allied the British royal house with those of Russia, Germany, Greece, Denmark, Romania, and others. Their sixth child, Princess Louise, is regarded by biographers as the couple’s most beautiful daughter. In 1871, Louise married the Marquess of Lorne and became the Duchess of Argyll. Why was the marriage controversial? More… Discuss