Tag Archives: Glass

Millefiori


Millefiori

Millefiori is a glassmaking technique in which a bundle of colored glass rods is heated, fused, drawn out thinly, and then cut to create flower patterns. Millefiori is of ancient origin and was used in Anglo-Saxon jewelry and decoration. The process was revived in 16th-century Venice, and then again in 19th-century France and Britain, where it was used for objects like paperweights. It was during this period that the technique was given its name, which combines two Italian words that mean what? More… Discuss

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Glassblowing


Glassblowing

Glassblowing is the art of shaping molten glass into a vessel by blowing air into it through a tube. Its processes have remained essentially the same since ancient times. Glass materials are fused at high temperatures, boiled down, skimmed, cooled several hundred degrees, and then blown. The manufacture of simple glass objects, like light bulbs, is now done by machines, but ornamental objects are still made using traditional methods. One key glassblowing tool is a “punty.” What is it used for? More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Marc Chagall (1887)


Marc Chagall (1887)

Chagall was a Belarusian artist often considered a forerunner of the surrealist movement. He began studying painting in 1907 and soon blended elements of cubism into his expressionistic style. His Jewish heritage served as a source of great inspiration to him, and images of Jewish life and folklore and biblical themes frequently feature in his art. He explored a variety of mediums, including painting, printmaking, etching, tapestry, mosaic, and stained glass. Where can his work be seen? More… Discuss

TODAY’S HOLIDAY: SHEELAH’S DAY


Sheelah’s Day

Even the Irish aren’t exactly sure who Sheelah was. Some say she was St. Patrick‘s wife; some say his mother. But one thing that they all seem to agree on is how this day should be celebrated: by drinking whiskey. The shamrock worn on St. Patrick’s Day is supposed to be worn on the following day as well, until it is “drowned” in the last glass of the evening. If someone should drop his shamrock into his glass and drink it before the “drowning ceremony” takes place, he has no choice but to get a fresh shamrock and another glass. More… Discuss

 

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: Louis Comfort Tiffany (1848)


Louis Comfort Tiffany (1848)

Tiffany was an American artist and designer best known for his work in stained glass. He studied painting with George Inness and later established an interior-decorating firm that came to be known as Tiffany Studios. The firm specialized in favrile glass work, characterized by iridescent colors and natural forms in the Art Nouveau style. After 1900, Tiffany’s firm ventured into jewelry, pottery, and lamps, which became enormously popular in the 1960s and were widely imitated. Who was his father? More… Discuss

 

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PRINCE RUPERT’S DROPS


Prince Rupert’s Drops

Prince Rupert’s Drops are formed when molten glass is dripped into cold water. The glass forms a tadpole-shaped droplet with a long, thin tail, and when the inside cools, it contracts, pressing against the already-solid outer part. Due to the residual stress, the extremely hard bulbous part can withstand a blow from a hammer, but if the tail is damaged even slightly, the entire drop shatters explosively into a fine powder. Prince Rupert did not invent the drops, so why are they named for him? More… Discuss