Tag Archives: Glossary of musical terminology

Mozart – Piano Concerto No. 26 in D major, K. 537, ‘Coronation’ (Murray Perahia): make music part of your life series


MozartPiano Concerto No. 26 in D major, K. 537, ‘Coronation’ (Murray Perahia)

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Great musical recordings: Brahms – Wilhelm Kempff 1950’s legacy (op. 10, 24, 76,79,116,117,118,119): Great compositions/performances


Brahms – Wilhelm Kempff 1950’s legacy (op. 10, 24, 76,79,116,117,118,119)

CZIFFRA – LISZT Transcendental Etude No.9 in A flat major, “Ricordanza”: great compositions/perfofrmances


CZIFFRA – LISZT Transcendental Etude No.9 in A flat major, “Ricordanza”

Sviatoslav Richter plays Rachmaninoff Concerto No.1, Op. 1: great compositions/performances


Sviatoslav Richter plays Rachmaninov Concerto No.1, Op.1

Mozart – Piano Concerto No. 16 in D Major, K. 451 (Vladimir Ashkenazy),: great compositions/performances


Mozart – Piano Concerto No. 16 in D Major, K. 451 (Vladimir Ashkenazy)

Practicing for my Salle Pleyel recital…and a fashion lesson Valentina Lisitsa


Practicing for my Salle Pleyel recital…and a fashion lesson 🙂 Valentina Lisitsa

Mendelssohn — Violin Concerto in e minor op 64: GREAT COMPOSITIONS/PERFORMANCES


Dvorak – Symphony No.3 & 4, Op.10 & 13|great compositions/performances


DvorakSymphony No.3 & 4,

Op.10 & 13

Beethoven – Piano Sonata No. 31 in A-flat major, Op. 110, Daniel Barenboim, great compositions/performances


Piano Sonata No. 31 – Beethoven

Antonín Dvořák – Romantische Stücke, Op. 75: make music part ofyour life series


Antonín Dvořák – Romantische Stücke, Op. 75

Symphony No. 3 in D Major, Op. 29 “Polish” – Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky: great compositions/performances


Symphony No. 3 in D Major, Op. 29 “Polish” – Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky

Tchaikovsky-Violin Concerto in D Major Op. 35: Great compositions/performances


Tchaikovsky-Violin Concerto in D Major Op. 35 (Complete)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:
 

The Violin Concerto in D major, Op. 35, was written by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky in 1878. It is one of the best known violin concertos, and is considered one of the most technically difficult works for the violin.

Tchaikovsky.gif

Composition

Tchaikovsky (right) with violinist Iosif Kotek

The piece was written in Clarens, a Swiss resort on the shores of Lake Geneva, where Tchaikovsky had gone to recover from the depression brought on by his disastrous marriage to Antonina Miliukova. He was working on his Piano Sonata in G major but finding it heavy going. Presently he was joined there by his composition pupil, the violinist Iosif Kotek, who had been in Berlin for violin studies with Joseph Joachim. The two played works for violin and piano together, including a violin-and-piano arrangement of Édouard Lalo‘s Symphonie espagnole, which they may have played through the day after Kotek’s arrival. This work may have been the catalyst for the composition of the concerto.[1] He wrote to his patroness Nadezhda von Meck, “It [the Symphonie espagnole] has a lot of freshness, lightness, of piquant rhythms, of beautiful and excellently harmonized melodies…. He [Lalo], in the same way as Léo Delibes and Bizet, does not strive after profundity, but he carefully avoids routine, seeks out new forms, and thinks more about musical beauty than about observing established traditions, as do the Germans.”[2] Tchaikovsky authority Dr. David Brown writes that Tchaikovsky “might almost have been writing the prescription for the violin concerto he himself was about to compose.”[3]

Tchaikovsky made swift, steady progress on the concerto, as by this point in his rest cure he had regained his inspiration, and the work was completed within a month despite the middle movement getting a complete rewrite (a version of the original movement was preserved as the first of the three pieces for violin and piano, Souvenir d’un lieu cher).[4] Since Tchaikovsky was not a violinist, he sought the advice of Kotek on the completion of the solo part.[5] “How lovingly he’s busying himself with my concerto!” Tchaikovsky wrote to his brother Anatoly on the day he completed the new slow movement. “It goes without saying that I would have been able to do nothing without him. He plays it marvelously.”[6]

Luigi Boccherini – String Quintet in E maj Opus 11 No 5 G275: make music part of your life series


Luigi BoccheriniString Quintet in E maj Opus 11 No 5 G275

P. I. Tchaikovsky – Serenade for Strings in C major, Op. 48 (Fedoseyev) Erudite Music Channel: make music part of your life series


P. I. TchaikovskySerenade for Strings in C major, Op. 48 (Fedoseyev)

Sergei Rachmaninoff -Symphonic Dances, Op. 45: great compositions/performances


Sergei Rachmaninoff –Symphonic Dances, Op. 45

Schumann – Symphony No 2 in C major, Op 61 – Harding: make music part of your life series


Schumann – Symphony No 2 in C major, Op 61 – Harding

P. I. Tchaikovsky – Serenade for Strings in C major, Op. 48 (Fedoseyev): make music part of your life series


P. I. TchaikovskySerenade for Strings in C major, Op. 48 (Fedoseyev)

Liszt – Piano Concerto No. 1 in Eb, S.124 (Richter): great compositions/performances


Franz Liszt: Piano Concerto #1 in Eb S.124(Richter)

Liszt Concerto #2 file1 Valentina Lisitsa (audio): great compositions/performances


FROM:

Liszt Concerto #2 file1 Valentina Lisitsa (audio)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Franz Liszt wrote drafts for his Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No. 2 in A major, S.125, during his virtuoso period, in 1839 to 1840. He then put away the manuscript for a decade. When he returned to the concerto, he revised and scrutinized it repeatedly. The fourth and final period of revision ended in 1861. Liszt dedicated the work to his student Hans von Bronsart, who gave the first performance, with Liszt conducting, in Weimar on January 7, 1857.

Form

This concerto is one single, long movement, divided into six sections that are connected by transformations of several themes:

  • Adagio sostenuto assai

    The key musical idea of this concerto comes at the beginning. Quietly yet confidently, half a dozen woodwinds, no more than five at a time, play a sequence of two chords—an A major chord with a C sharp on top, then a dominant seventh on F natural. The first chord sounds very ordinary. The second opens possibilities unhinted by what preceded it. One note connects the two chords—an A. This sequence sounds colorful and strange yet inevitable and easily grasped.

  • Allegro agitato assai

    This is technically the scherzo of the piece. It starts in B-flat minor and ends in C-sharp minor.

  • Allegro moderato

    This section contains a great deal of lyricism and proceeds at an unhurried pace. Among its charms is a metamorphosis of the opening theme, played by solo cello while accompanied by the piano, showing the influence of Italian bel canto on Liszt’s work.

  • Allegro deciso

  • Marziale un poco meno allegro

    Yet another transformation of the gentle opening theme, this movement has also nearly always been attacked as vulgar and a betrayal of both the initial character of this theme and the concerto on the whole. American musicologist Robert Winter disagreed. He called the march “a masterstroke that demonstrates the full emotional range of thematic transformation.”[1] The march contains the force and weight needed to reestablish the home key of A major, from which the music has been moving quite far since the concerto opened.

  • Allegro animato

Sviatoslav Richter plays Schubert Sonata D.575: Great compositions/performances


Sviatoslav Richter plays Schubert Sonata D.575

The Piano Sonata in B major, D. 575 by Franz Schubert is a sonata for solo piano, posthumously published as Op. 147. Schubert composed the sonata in August 1817.

Movements

I. Allegro ma non troppo (B major)

II. Andante (E major)

III. Scherzo: Allegretto – Trio (G major, D Major)

IV. Allegro giusto (B major)

 

Mendelssohn – String Quartet No. 1, Op. 12: make music part of your life series


Mendelssohn – String Quartet No. 1, Op. 12

Felix Mendelssohn-Bartoldy

String Quartet No.1, Op.12 (1829)

1. Adagio non troppo – Allegro non tardante
2. Canzonetta – Allegretto (7:42)
3. Andante espressivo (11:48)
4. Molto allegro e vivace (15:23)

Melos Quartet

Editor:
Julius Rietz (1812–1877)

Publisher Info.:
Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdys Werke, Serie 6.
Leipzig: Breitkopf & Härtel, 1875. Plate M.B. 22.

Reprinted:
Mineola: Dover Publications

make music part of your life series: The Symphony No. 7 in A major, Op. 9


[youtube.com/watch?v=7MqrBauptrE]

The Symphony No. 7 in A major, Op. 9

 Form  
 The Seventh Symphony is in four movements:

Poco sostenutoVivace
Allegretto
Presto – Assai meno presto (trio)

Allegro con brio

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Portrait of Beethoven in 1815, by Joseph Willibrord Mähler, two years after the premiere of his 7th Symphony

The Symphony No. 7 in A major, Op. 92, is a symphony in four movements composed by Ludwig van Beethoven between 1811 and 1812, while improving his health in the Bohemian spa town of Teplice. The work is dedicated to Count Moritz von Fries.

At its première, Beethoven was noted as remarking that it was one of his best works. The second movement, Allegretto, was the most popular movement and had to be encored. The instant popularity of the Allegretto resulted in its frequent performance separate from the complete symphony.[1]

 

 

make music part of your life series: Antonín Dvořák – Waltzes, Op. 54


[youtube.com/watch?v=8qyn3j4wYgE]

Antonín Dvořák – Waltzes, Op. 54

Kai Adomeit, piano
Antonín Dvořák – Waltzes, Op. 54

1. No. 1, moderato in A major 3’35
2. No. 2, allegro con fuoco in A minor 3’20
3. No. 3, poco allegro in E major 2’43
4. No. 4, allegro vivace in D flat major 2’48
5. No. 5, allegro in B flat major 2’34
6. No. 6, allegro in F major 3’49
7. No. 7, allegro in D minor 2’20
8. No. 8, allegro vivace in E flat major 2’47

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MAKE MUSIC PART OF YOUR LIFE SERIES: Antonín Dvořák – Serenade in D minor, Op. 44


[youtube.com/watch?v=usvb0NRZP38]

Antonín Dvořák – Serenade in D minor, Op. 44

Nash Ensemble

Antonín Dvořák – Serenade in D minor, Op. 44
1. Moderato, alla Marcia 4’17
2. Minuetto 6’08
3. Andante con moto 8’35
4. Allegro molto 6’13

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Great Compositions/Performances: Beethoven Piano Sonata No. 4, in E-flat major, Op. 7


[youtube.com/watch?v=F6032vFG7PQ]

Beethoven Piano Sonata No. 4, in E-flat major, Op. 7

Ludwig van Beethoven
Piano Sonata No. 4, in E-flat major, Op. 7
Wilhelm Kempff (piano)
in 1951

0:00 1st mov. Allegro molto e con brio
8:41 2nd mov. Largo, con gran espressione
16:31 3rd mov. Allegro
21:50 4th mov. Rondo: Poco allegretto e grazioso

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Enescu – Sonata for Cello and Piano No. 1 in F minor, Op. 26


[youtube.com/watch?v=qdGh5UqbbuA]

Make Music Part of Your Life Series: 
Enescu – Sonata for Cello and Piano No. 1 in F minor, Op. 26 (1898)

[1] Allegro molto moderato
[2] Allegretto scherzando 14:30
[3] Molto andante 22:09
[4] Presto 34:16

Andrei Csaba (cello)
Dan Grigore (piano)

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Antonín Dvořák – Legends, Op. 59 [Ingryd Thorson & Julian Thurber, piano]


[youtube.com/watch?v=y_-m1BXYKgo]
Ingryd Thorson & Julian Thurber, piano

Antonín Dvořák – Legends, Op. 59

1. Allegretto non troppo, quasi andantino [D minor] 3’03
2. Molto moderato [G major] 4’08
3. Allegro giusto [G minor] 4’11
4. Molto maestoso [C major] 5’30
5. Allegro giusto [A flat major] 4’16
6. Allegro con moto [C sharp minor] 4’21
7. Allegretto grazioso [A major] 2’14
8. Un poco allegretto e grazioso, quasi andantino [F major] 3’16
9. Andante con moto [D major] 2’27
10. Andante [B flat minor] 3’14

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Saint-Saëns – Concerto no 1 pour piano et orchestre – Jeanne-Marie Darré


[youtube.com/watch?v=XBvJqdRLgaE]
Camille Saint-Saëns

Concerto pour piano et orchestre no 1
en ré majeur – opus 17

Jeanne-Marie Darré 

Orchestre National de la Radiodiffusion Française
Louis Fourestier 

Enregistré en 1956

I- Andante – Allegro assai 00:00

II- Andante sostenuto quasi adagio 10:19

III- Allegro con fuoco 17:52

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Most Beautiful Music: Dvořák Symphony No 9 “New World” Celibidache, Münchner Philharmoniker, 1991


[youtube.com/watch?v=_9RT2nHD6CQ]
Dvořák – Symohony No. 9 in E minor op. 95 “From The New World”
Münchner Philharmoniker conducted by Sergiu Celibidache
Recorded 1991
1. Adagio – Allegro molto
2. Largo
3. Scherzo. Molto vivace
4. Allegro con fuoco

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DAVORIN DOLINŠEK and POPV perform LEROY ANDERSON: PIANO CONCERTO IN C (Slovenian premiere!)



Concert of POPV – Symphonic Wind Orchestra of Premogovnik Velenje, 8.12.2012
Conductor: Matjaž Emeršič
Soloist: Davorin Dolinšek

Leroy Anderson: Concert for Piano and Orchestra in C major
Allegro Moderato [Cadenza I: at 7’39”]
Andante-Allegretto (starts at 8’35”)
Allegro Vivo (starts at 14’16”) [Cadenza II: at 18’40”]

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GREAT COMPOSITIONS/PERFORMANCES: Lipatti & Ansermet – Schumann Concerto in A minor Op. 54



1. Allegro affettuoso
2. Intermezzo: Andantino grazioso (15:32)
3. Allegro vivace (20:26)

Dinu Lipatti, piano
Ernest Ansermet conducting the Orchestre de la Suisse Romande
live – Geneva, February 22, 1950

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Schumann – Alexis Weissenberg (1967) Davidsbündlertänze, Op 6



The first edition is preceded by the following epigraph:

Alter Spruch:

In all und jeder Zeit
Verknüpft sich Lust und Leid:
Bleibt fromm in Lust und seid
Dem Leid mit Mut bereit

(Old saying:

In each and every age
joy and sorrow are mingled:
Remain pious in joy,
and be ready for sorrow with courage.)

The individual pieces, unnamed, have the following tempo markings, keys and ascriptions: Lebhaft (Vivace), G major, Florestan and Eusebius; Innig (Con intimo sentimento), B minor, Eusebius; Etwas hahnbüchen (Un poco impetuoso) (1st edition), Mit Humor (Con umore) (2nd edition), G major, Florestan (Hahnbüchen, now usually hahnebüchen (also hanebüchen or hagebüchen), is an untranslatable colloquialism roughly meaning “coarse” or “clumsy.” Apparently, it originally meant “made of hornbeam wood.” (See the article “Hanebüchen” in the German version of Wikipedia.) Ernest Hutcheson translated it as “cockeyed” in his book The Literature of the Piano.); Ungeduldig (Con impazienza), B minor, Florestan; Einfach (Semplice), D major, Eusebius; Sehr rasch und in sich hinein (Molto vivo, con intimo fervore) (1st edition), Sehr rasch (Molto vivo) (2nd edition), D minor, Florestan; Nicht schnell mit äußerst starker Empfindung (Non presto profondamente espressivo) (1st edition), Nicht schnell (Non presto) (2nd edition), G minor, Eusebius; Frisch (Con freschezza), C minor, Florestan; No tempo indication (metronome mark of 1 crotchet = 126) (1st edition), Lebhaft (Vivace) (2nd edition), C major, Florestan; Balladenmäßig sehr rasch (Alla ballata molto vivo) (1st edition), (“Sehr” and “Molto” capitalized in 2nd edition), D minor (ends major), Florestan; Einfach (Semplice), B minor-D major, Eusebius; Mit Humor (Con umore), B minor-E minor and major, Florestan; Wild und lustig (Selvaggio e gaio), B minor and major, Florestan and Eusebius; Zart und singend (Dolce e cantando), E♭ major, Eusebius; Frisch (Con freschezza), B♭ major – Etwas bewegter (poco piu mosso), E♭ major (return to opening section is optional), Florestan and Eusebius; Mit gutem Humor (Con buon umore) (in 2nd edition, “Con umore”), G major – Etwas langsamer (Un poco più lento), B minor; leading without a break into Wie aus der Ferne (Come da lontano), B major and minor (including a full reprise of No. 2), Florestan and Eusebius; and Nicht schnell (Non presto), C major, Eusebius.

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Mendelssohn Cello Sonata no.2 Natalia Gutman & Viacheslav Poprugin



Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy sonata for cello and piano op.58 in D major
1.Allegro assai vivace 0:02
2.Allegretto scherzando 8:48
3.Adagio 13:42
4.Molto allegro e vivace 18:15

Natalia Gutman cello
Viacheslav Poprugin piano

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life: Arrau Schumann Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 54



Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 54

1.- Allegro Affettuoso
2.- Intermezzo: Andantino Grazioso
3.- Allegro Vivace

Film footage recorded in 1963

Robert Schumann (1810-1856)
Claudio Arrau (1903-1991)

 

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Antonín Dvořák – Bagatelles, Op. 47



Alberni String Quartet.
Howard Davis, violin.
Peter Pople, violin.
Roger Best, violin/viola.
David Smith, cello.
Virginia Black, harmonium

Antonín Dvořák – Bagatelles, Op. 47
1. Allegretto scherzando 2’59
2. Tempo di menuetto, grazioso 3’16
3. Allegretto scherzando 2’56
4. Canon, andante con moto 3’27
5. Poco allegro 4’21

 

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GREAT PERFORMANCES: Schumann – Symphony n°2 – Leonard Bernstein (live recording)



Published on Mar 6, 2013
Robert Schumann (1810 – 1856) – Symphony n°2 in C major opus 61

I. Sostenuto assai (00:00) – Allegro ma non troppo (03:41)
II. Scherzo. Allegro vivace (12:26)
III. Adagio espressivo (19:20)
IV. Allegro molto vivace (32:46)

Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra (Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks), dir Leonard Bernstein
(live recording 1983)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  

The Symphony in C major by German composer Robert Schumann was published in 1847 as his Symphony No. 2, Op. 61, although it was the third symphony he had completed, counting the B-flat major symphony published as No. 1 in 1841, and the original version of his D minor symphony of 1841 (later revised and published as No. 4).

Schumann began to sketch the symphony on December 12, 1845, and had a robust draft of the entire work by December 28. He spent most of the next year orchestrating, beginning February 12, 1846.[1] His depression and poor health, including ringing in his ears, prevented him finishing the work until October 19. Publication followed in 1847.

The uplifting tone of the symphony is remarkable in the face of Schumann’s health problems—the work can be seen as a Beethovenian triumph over fate/pessimism. It is written in the traditional four-movement form, and as often in the nineteenth century the Scherzo precedes the Adagio. All four movements are in C major, except the first part of the slow movement (in C minor); the work is thus homotonal:

  1. Sostenuto assai — Allegro, ma non troppo
  2. Scherzo: Allegro vivace
  3. Adagio espressivo
  4. Allegro molto vivace
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Great Compsition/Performances: Antonin Dvorak – Slavonic Dances [Op. 46 & Op. 72]



The Slavonic Dances are a series of 16 orchestral pieces composed by Antonín Dvořák in 1878 and 1886 and published in two sets as Opus 46 and Opus 72 respectively; they were inspired by Johannes Brahms’s own Hungarian Dances.

The types of dances upon which Dvořák based his music include the furiant, the dumka, the polka, the sousedská, the skočná, the mazurka, the odzemek, the špacírka, the kolo and the polonaise.

Opus 46
0:00 No. 1 in C major: Presto (Furiant)
3:38 No. 2 in E minor: Allegretto scherzando (Dumka)
8:21 No. 3 in A-flat major: Poco allegro (Polka)
12:31 No. 4 in F major: Tempo di Minuetto (Sousedská)
20:19 No. 5 in A major: Allegro vivace (Skočná)
23:31 No. 6 in D major: Allegretto scherzando (Sousedská)
28:05 No. 7 in C minor: Allegro assai (Skočná)
31:19 No. 8 in G minor: Presto (Furiant)

Opus 72
34:58 No. 1 (9) in B major: Molto vivace (Odzemek)
38:33 No. 2 (10) in E minor: Allegretto grazioso (Starodávný)
43:42 No. 3 (11) in F major: Allegro (Skočná)
46:51 No. 4 (12) in D-flat major: Allegretto grazioso (Dumka)
51:48 No. 5 (13) in B-flat minor: Poco adagio (Špacírka)
54:08 No. 6 (14) in B-flat major: Moderato, quasi Minuetto (Starodávný -“Ancient”-)
57:43 No. 7 (15) in C major: Allegro vivace (Kolo)
1:00:51 No. 8 (16) in A-flat major: Grazioso e lento, ma non troppo, quasi tempo di Valse (Sousedská)

No copyright infringement intended. The rights of this song/composition go to their respective owners.
**I’m talking about the recordings**

 

Great Performances: ANTONIN DVORÁK – SINFONIE NO. 8 IN G-DUR OP. 88 – WIENER PHILHARMONIKER – HERBERT VON KARAJAN



I. Allegro con brio[0:06]
II. Adagio – [9:57]
III. Allegretto grazioso, molto vivace – [21:28]
IV. Allegro ma non troppo – [27:05]
Wiener Philharmoniker – 
Herbert von Karajan, Leitung –
Großer Musikvereinssaal Wien
Januar/Februar 1985

 

Mikhail Pletnev & Soloists Ensemble play Glinka: Grand Sextet in E flat major for piano, string quartet and double bass



Mikhail Pletnev & Soloists Ensemble play Glinka Grand Sextet in E flat major for piano, string quartet and double bass.  Recording in 1993 by Olympia.
Mikhail Pletnev, piano
Alexei Bruni, violin
Mikhail Moshkunov, violin
Andrei Kevorkov, viola
Erik Pozdeev, cello
Nikolai Gorbunov, double bass
I. Allegro
II. Andante – (attacca). 
III. Finale. Allegro con spirito

Mozart – Flute Quartet No. 4 in A, K. 298



Mozart – Flute Quartet No. 4 in A, K. 298

The Flute Quartet No. 4 in A major, K. 298, by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart is Mozart’s final composition for flute quartet. Unlike the previous three quartets, written for the flutist Ferdinand De Jean, the Quartet in A is believed to have been written for recreational purposes, as opposed to on commission. The low Köchel number is misleading. The work is thought to have been written sometime in 1786 or 1787, only a few years before the composer’s death.
It is in three movements:
1. Andante, Theme and variations
2. Menuetto, D major, 3/4
3. Rondeau: [Allegretto grazioso], 2/4
The third movement is notable for its almost humorously detailed tempo indication: “Rondieaoux: Allegretto grazioso, ma non troppo presto, pero non troppo adagio. Così-così—non molto garbo ed espressione” (or, translated, “A joke rondo: Allegretto grazioso, but not too fast, nor too slow. So-so—with great elegance and expression”).
A typical performance lasts about 11 minutes.

 

Enescu – Piano Quartet No. 2 in D minor, Op. 30



EnescuPiano Quartet No. 2 in D minor, Op. 30 (1944)

[1] Allegro moderato 
[2] Andante 9:12 
[3] Con moto moderato 17:42

Valentin Gheorghiu (piano)
Ştefan Gheorghiu (violin)
Valeriu Pitulac (viola)
Aurel Niculescu (cello)

Recorded: 1981

 

A. VIVALDI, Concerto for 2 Violins, Strings and B.C. in G minor RV 155, La Magnifica Comunità



Antonio Vivaldi

Concerto for 2 Violins, Strings and B.C. in G minor RV 155:
I. Adagio 0:01 
II. Allegro 2:18 
III. Largo 6:03
IV. Allegro 9:40

La Magnifica Comunità 
Enrico Casazza [director]
Edition by Pablo Queipo de Llano

 

P. I. Tchaikovsky – Serenade for Strings in C major, Op. 48 (Fedoseyev)



P. I. TchaikovskySerenade for Strings in C major, Op. 48 (1880):
1. Pezzo in forma di sonatina: Andante non troppo — Allegro moderato
2. Valse: Moderato — Tempo di valse (10:58)
3. Élégie: Larghetto elegiaco (15:16 )
4. Finale (Tema russo): Andante — Allegro con spirito (24:19)

Moskow Radio Symphony Orchestra
Conductor – Vladimir Fedoseyev
Recorded live at the Alte Oper Frankfurt, 1991

 

Serenade for flute, violin and viola in D major, Op. 25 (Vienna, Cappi, 1802)



Serenade for flute, violin and viola in D major, Op. 25 (Vienna, Cappi, 1802)
[date: c. 1796]

I. Entrata (Allegro
II. Tempo ordinario d’un Minuetto 
III. Allegro molto in D minor
IV. Andante con variazioni in C major
V. Allegro scherzando e vivace
VI. Adagio
VII. Allegro vivace

 

Dvořák – Czech Suite, Op. 39


Composer: Antonín Dvořák (1841-1904)
Janácek Philharmonic Orchestra, Theodore Kuchar

Adolf Čech conducted the first performance in Prague on May 16, 1879

I. Preludium (Pastorale)Allegro moderato
II. Polka – Allegretto grazioso
III. Sousedská (Minuetto) – Allegro giusto
IV. Romance (Romanza) – Andante con moto
V. Finale (Furiant) – Presto

 

Antonin Dvorak – Slavonic Dances [Op. 46 & Op. 72]



The Slavonic Dances are a series of 16 orchestral pieces composed by Antonín Dvořák in 1878 and 1886 and published in two sets as Opus 46 and Opus 72 respectively; they were inspired by Johannes Brahms’s own Hungarian Dances.

The types of dances upon which Dvořák based his music include the furiant, the dumka, the polka, the sousedská, the skočná, the mazurka, the odzemek, the špacírka, the kolo and the polonaise.

Opus 46
0:00 No. 1 in C major: Presto (Furiant)
3:38 No. 2 in E minor: Allegretto scherzando (Dumka)
8:21 No. 3 in A-flat major: Poco allegro (Polka)
12:31 No. 4 in F major: Tempo di Minuetto (Sousedská)
20:19 No. 5 in A major: Allegro vivace (Skočná)
23:31 No. 6 in D major: Allegretto scherzando (Sousedská)
28:05 No. 7 in C minor: Allegro assai (Skočná)
31:19 No. 8 in G minor: Presto (Furiant)

Opus 72
34:58 No. 1 (9) in B major: Molto vivace (Odzemek)
38:33 No. 2 (10) in E minor: Allegretto grazioso (Starodávný)
43:42 No. 3 (11) in F major: Allegro (Skočná)
46:51 No. 4 (12) in D-flat major: Allegretto grazioso (Dumka)
51:48 No. 5 (13) in B-flat minor: Poco adagio (Špacírka)
54:08 No. 6 (14) in B-flat major: Moderato, quasi Minuetto (Starodávný -“Ancient”-)
57:43 No. 7 (15) in C major: Allegro vivace (Kolo)
1:00:51 No. 8 (16) in A-flat major: Grazioso e lento, ma non troppo, quasi tempo di Valse (Sousedská)

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**I’m talking about the recordings**