Tag Archives: Gospel of Matthew

Leonard Cohen: “… what comes after America.”


Leonard Cohen:”… what comes after America.”

 

Published on Apr 5, 2015
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Pope says his concern for poor comes from Gospel | bt24News We all know that Marx was born some 19 centuries after the birth of Christianity)


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A seagull flies near the window as Pope Francis reads out his Sunday Angelus prayer in the Vatican on Sunday.— AP

Pope Francis is insisting that his concern for the poor and critique of the global economic system isn’t some novel, communist-inspired ideology but rather the original and core “touchstone” of the Christian faith.

Some US conservatives have branded the first Latin American pope a Marxist for his frequent critiques of consumerism and focus on a church “that is poor and for the poor.” But in an interview contained in a new book, Pope Francis explains that his message is rooted in the Gospel and has been echoed by church fathers since Christianity’s first centuries.

via Pope says his concern for poor comes from Gospel | bt24News.

Saint of the Day for Friday, December 26th, 2014: St. Stephen Observed worldwide by Christians of all denominations


Pope Dionysius (259 - 268), Fresco in Sixtine ...

Pope Dionysius (259 – 268), Fresco in Sixtine Chapel, Vatican (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Image of St. Stephen

St. Stephen

Stephen’s name means “crown,” and he was the first disciple of Jesus to receive the martyr’s crown. Stephen was a deacon in the early Christian Church. The apostles had found that they … continue reading

Pope Zosimus

Pope Zosimus (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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Adoration of the Magi. @BLMedieval Egerton 2125 f. 182v — Melibeus (@melibeus1): trei crai de la rasarit


Grupul psaltic Tronos-Trei crai de la rasarit.

Adoration of the Magi by Fra Angelico and Fili...

Adoration of the Magi by Fra Angelico and Filippo Lippi. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Adoration of the Magi, tapestry, wool and ...

The Adoration of the Magi, tapestry, wool and silk on cotton warp, 101 1/8 x 151 1/4 inches (258 x 384 cm.), Manchester Metropolitan University (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Adoration of the Magi (circa 1305) by Giot...

The Adoration of the Magi (circa 1305) by Giotto, purportedly depicting Halley. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Adoration of the Magi

The Adoration of the Magi (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Saint of the Day for Sunday, September 21st, 2014: St. Matthew the Apostle


English: Apostle Matthew

English: Apostle Matthew (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

  St. Matthew the Apostle

English: the first page of the Gospel of Matthew

English: the first page of the Gospel of Matthew (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

St. Matthew, one of the twelve Apostles, is the author of the first Gospel. This has been the constant tradition of the Church and is confirmed by the Gospel itself. He was the son of Alpheus and was … continue reading

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Brilliant Music: Bach – Cantata BWV 140 – Peter Schreier – Sleepers wake


Bach – Cantata BWV 140Peter Schreier – Sleepers wake

Zion hoert die Waechter singen 
Conductor: Karl Richter
Tenor: Peter Schreier
Orchestra: Munich Bach Choir, Munich Bach Orchestra
Sleepers Wake

from wikipedia

Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme (Awake, calls the voice to us), BWV 140, also known as Sleepers Wake, is achurch cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed the chorale cantata in Leipzig for the 27th Sunday afterTrinity and first performed it on 25 November 1731. It is based on the hymn “Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme” (1599) by Philipp Nicolai. Movement 4 of the cantata is the base for the first of Bach’s Schübler Chorales, BWV 645. The cantata is a late addition to Bach’s cycle of chorale cantatas, featuring additional poetry for two duets of Jesus and the Soul which expand the theme of the hymn.

History and text

Bach composed the cantata in Leipzig for the 27th Sunday after Trinity. This Sunday occurs only when Easter is extremely early.[1] The prescribed readings for the Sunday were from the First Epistle to the Thessalonians, be prepared for the day of the Lord (1 Thessalonians 5:1–11), and from the Gospel of Matthew, the parable of the Ten Virgins (Matthew 25:1–13).[2] The chorale cantata is based on the Lutheran hymn in three stanzas, “Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme” of Philipp Nicolai, which is based on the Gospel.[1] Bach composed the cantata to complete his cycle of chorale cantatas which he had begun in 1724.[3][4] The text of the three stanzas appears unchanged in movements 1, 4 and 7, while an unknown author supplied poetry for movements 2 and 3, 5 and 6, both a sequence ofrecitative and duet.[5] He refers to the love poetry of the Song of Songs, showing Jesus as the bridegroom of the Soul.[3] According to Christoph Wolff, the text was already available when Bach composed his cycle of chorale cantatas.[6]

Bach performed the cantata only once, in Leipzig’s main church Nikolaikirche on 25 November 1731.[3] According toChristoph Wolff, Bach performed it only this one time, although the 27th Sunday after Trinity occurred one more time during his tenure in Leipzig, in 1742.[1] He used movement 4 of the cantata as the base for the first of his Schübler Chorales, BWV 645.[6]

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Parable of the talents or minas


 

Parable of the talents or minas

 
 

The parable of the talents, as depicted in a 1...

The parable of the talents, as depicted in a 1712 woodcut. The lazy servant searches for his buried talent, while the two other servants present their earnings to their master. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The parable of the talents, as depicted in a 1712 woodcut. The lazy servant searches for his buried talent, while the two other servants present their earnings to their master.

The Parable of the talents or minas, (also known as the Parable of Talents or The Parable of the Pounds), is one of the well known parables of Jesus. It appears in two of the Canonical gospels of the New Testament, and a variant is also found in the noncanonical Gospel of the Hebrews. The differences between Matthew25:14-30 and the Luke 19:12-27 are substantial, and the two parables may not be derived from the same source.[1] In Matthew, the opening words appear to link the parable to the preceding parable of the Ten Virgins,[1] a parable about the Kingdom of Heaven.