Tag Archives: Greenland

this day in the yesteryear: Last Pair of Great Auks Killed (1844)


Last Pair of Great Auks Killed (1844)

Extinct since 1844, the great auk was a flightless seabird once found in great numbers on rocky islands off eastern Canada, Greenland, Iceland, Norway, Ireland, and Britain. The bird was hunted on a significant scale by humans for food, eggs, and down since at least the 8th century, but massive exploitation for its down and the collecting of its eggs eventually contributed to the demise of the species. Specimens are now exhibited in many museums. Where was the last pair of great auks killed? More… Discuss

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today’s holiday: Nuuk Snow Festival (2015)


Nuuk Snow Festival (2015)

In 1994, the town of Nuuk, Greenland, held its first snow-sculpture festival. It has since become an annual event, scheduled for the third weekend in March. It attracts contestants from all over Greenland, as well as from Canada, the US, Sweden, Norway, Finland, and Denmark. Festival organizers give each team of sculptors a compressed block of snow. The teams then set to work, transforming the square blocks into an amazing variety of shapes. Their efforts are displayed in a sculpture park that is illuminated at night, creating beautiful lights and shadows on the sculptures. More… Discuss

Redwoods


Redwoods

Redwoods are the tallest living trees, often exceeding 300 ft (90 m) in height. Nearly exterminated by the ice sheets of the glacial ages, redwoods are found only in a narrow strip near the Pacific coast of the northwest US. They take up to 500 years to reach maturity, and some are known to be more than 1,500 years old. As redwoods age, their lower limbs fall away, leaving a columnar trunk that can reach a diameter of more than 20 ft (6 m). What is the largest tree in the world? More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Nunavut Day


Nunavut Day

Canada’s northernmost territory of Nunavut was established on July 9, 1993, through a land claim signed by the national government and the Inuit of the Nunavut Settlement Area. Most of the day’s activities take place in Nunavut’s hub and capital city, Iqaluit. Festivities include barbeques, parades, traditional Inuit games, and feasts featuring local cuisine of caribou, walrus, and arctic char. In recent years, the day’s program has also included organized tournaments of cribbage, checkers, and Scrabble. More… Discuss

we’re blessed, poetic thought by George-B (©Always) (the smudge and other poems)


we’re blessed, poetic thought by George-B (©Always)

The snow is melting on Kilimanjaro,
The snow is melting everywhere else
The water levels are rising, and they will continue to
Water cannot escape the earth, the air is captive:
We are lucky that way…
we’re blessed.

Today’s Birthday: LOUISE ARNER BOYD (1887)


Louise Arner Boyd (1887)

Boyd was an American explorer of Greenland and the Arctic and the first woman to fly over the North Pole. After the deaths of her parents and brothers, she inherited the family fortune and chartered the ship of famed explorer Roald Amundsen for a trip to the Arctic. She gained notoriety for hunting polar bears and was called “The Girl Who Tamed the Arctic.” She later canceled another expedition, stating, “How could I go on a pleasure trip when those 22 lives were at stake?” What had happened? More… Discuss

 

GRAND-ER CANYON DISCOVERED UNDER GREENLAND ICE SHEET


Grand-er Canyon Discovered Under Greenland Ice Sheet

Hidden beneath the ice sheet that covers much ofGreenland is a vast canyon half a mile (800 m) deep and 470 miles (750 km) in length. By comparison, the Grand Canyon, though deeper, is just 217 miles (349 km) long. The hidden gorge, which has never been seen by human eyes, was discovered by chance as scientists researching climate change mapped Greenland’s bedrock. Now covered by an ice sheet that is 2 miles (3 km) thick at points and is so heavy it causes the entire island of Greenland to sag in the middle, the canyon was likely carved millions of years ago by an ancient river. More… Discuss