Tag Archives: Guatemala

People and Places: Famagusta


Famagusta

The city of Famagusta is located in Eastern Cyprus. It occupies the site of ancient Arsinoë—built in the 3rd century BCE by the Egyptian king Ptolemy II—and is thought to be the setting for much of Shakespeare’s play Othello. In the 20th century, Famagusta served as a British naval base and was heavily bombed in World War II. From 1946–1948, a British internment camp for illegal Jewish immigrants to Palestine was maintained near the city. Why was Famagusta completely evacuated in 1974? More… Discuss

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todayd’s holiday: Burning the Devil


Burning the Devil

La Quema del Diablo takes place in Guatemala. Men dressed as devils chase children through the streets from the start of Advent until December 7, the eve of the Immaculate Conception. On this day, trash fires are lit in the streets of Guatemala City and other towns, and the devils’ reign of terror comes to an end. More… Discuss

Market and fireworks, Chichicastenango

today’s holiday: Guatemala All Saints’ Day and All Souls’ Day


Guatemala All Saints’ Day and All Souls’ Day

Throughout Latin America, All Saints’ Day, November 1, and All Souls’ Day, November 2, are treated like a single holiday. In Guatemala, the villagers of Todos Santos stretch these celebrations honoring the dead into a three-day-long affair by adding October 31. The highlight of the festival is the wild horse races, in which many of the riders have been drinking since the previous night. In the town of Santiago Sacatepéquez, people fly huge kites in the graveyard, and many attach prayers and notes for their deceased loved ones to the kites’ tails. More… Discuss

Central America Unaccompanied Child: Migration United Nations Report


Central America Unaccompanied Child Migration

This Day in the Yesteryear: EUROPEAN EXPLORER JUAN RODRÍGUEZ CABRILLO DISCOVERS CALIFORNIA (1542)


European Explorer Juan Rodríguez Cabrillo Discovers California (1542)

In 1520, Cabrillo, an explorer in the service of Spain, landed in Mexico and joined in the conquests of Mexico and Guatemala. Some 20 years later, he accompanied an expedition up the west coast of Mexico, assuming its command after the death of its original commander. He then proceeded to explore much of the coast of what is now the state of California, becoming the first European to do so. How far north did he get before complications from a broken bone, possibly gangrene, took his life? More… Discuss

 

From Democracy Now: The Video Guatemala’s President Doesn’t Want You To See Perez Molina = Mayor Tito! Troubling!


Published on Apr 19, 2013

Watch the full interview with reporter Allan Nairn talking about his 1982 interview with Guatemala’s new president, Otto Pérez Molina, on Democracy Now! at http://owl.li/kesMR. In 1982, Nairn interviewed a Guatemalan general nicknamed “Tito” on camera during the height of the indigenous massacres. It turns out the man was actually Otto Pérez Molina, the current president of Guatemala. We air the original interview footage and speak to Nairn about the U.S. role backing the Guatemalan dictatorship. Nairn was scheduled to testify this week in the genocide trial of former Guatemalan dictator Efraín Ríos Montt.

Nairn flew to Guatemala for the Ríos Montt trial after he was called to testify. But at the last minute, Nairn was kept off the stand “in order,” he was told, “to avoid a confrontation” with the president — General Pérez Molina — and for fear that if he took the stand, military elements might respond with violence. “They knew that I could implicate Pérez Molina further, because I had met him in the highlands during the massacres when he was operating under a code name, and I interviewed soldiers under his commands who described how under orders they executed and tortured civilians,” Nairn says.

AMY GOODMAN: This is a huge charge. I mean, right now, it’s an historic trial when it’s 25 years after a past president is now being charged. Let’s go to a clip of Otto Pérez Molina, the current president of Guatemala, but this is 1982 in the heartland area of Quiché in northwest Guatemala, northwest of Guatemala City. In this video clip, Otto Pérez Molina is seen reading from political literature found on one of the bodies. This is your interview with him.

MAYOR OTTO PÉREZ MOLINA: [translated] “The poor artisan fights alongside the worker. The poor peasant fights alongside the worker. The wealth is produced by us, the poor. The army takes the poor peasants. Together, we have an invincible force. All the families are with the guerrilla, the guerrilla army of the poor, toward final victory forever.” These are the different fronts that they have.

ALLAN NAIRN: [translated] So here they are saying that the army killed some people.

MAYOR OTTO PÉREZ MOLINA: [translated] Exactly.

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