Tag Archives: Hans von Bülow

Great Compositions/Performances: Bernstein – Academic Festival Overture (Brahms)



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GREAT COMPOSITIONS/PERFORMANCES: Brahms Piano concerto N° 2 (Barenboim – Celibidache)



Johannes Brahms (1833 – 1897)
Pianokonzer Nr. 2
Piano concerto N° 2

München Philharmoniker
Dirigent: Sergiu Celibidache
Piano: Daniel Barenboim

1st mov 00:30
2nd mov 20:00
3rd mov 29:55
4th mov 42:26

 

Johannes Brahms

Johannes Brahms (German: [joˈhanəs ˈbʁaːms]; 7 May 1833 – 3 April 1897) was a German composer and pianist.

Born in Hamburg into a Lutheran family, Brahms spent much of his professional life in Vienna, Austria, where he was a leader of the musical scene. In his lifetime, Brahms’s popularity and influence were considerable; following a comment by the nineteenth-century conductor Hans von Bülow, he is sometimes grouped with Johann Sebastian Bach and Ludwig van Beethoven as one of the “Three Bs“.

Brahms composed for piano, chamber ensembles, symphony orchestra, and for voice and chorus. A virtuoso pianist, he premiered many of his own works; he worked with some of the leading performers of his time, including the pianist Clara Schumann and the violinistJoseph Joachim. Many of his works have become staples of the modern concert repertoire. Brahms, an uncompromising perfectionist, destroyed some of his works and left others unpublished.[1]

Brahms is often considered both a traditionalist and an innovator. His music is firmly rooted in the structures and compositional techniques of the Baroque and Classical masters. He was a master of counterpoint, the complex and highly disciplined art for which Johann Sebastian Bach is famous, and of development, a compositional ethos pioneered by Joseph HaydnWolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Ludwig van Beethoven, and other composers. Brahms aimed to honour the “purity” of these venerable “German” structures and advance them into a Romantic idiom, in the process creating bold new approaches to harmony and melody. While many contemporaries found his music too academic, his contribution and craftsmanship have been admired by subsequent figures as diverse as Arnold Schoenberg and Edward Elgar. The diligent, highly constructed nature of Brahms’s works was a starting point and an inspiration for a generation of composers.

 

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Kempff plays Schubert Piano Sonata in A Minor D845, Op.42


The Piano Sonata in A minor, D. 845 (Op. 42) by Franz Schubert is a sonata for solo piano, composed in May 1825.

Piano Sonata in A Minor D845: 

I. Moderato, A minor 00:00

II. Andante poco moto, C major. (4 measures missing after measure 43) 8:06

III. Scherzo: Allegro vivace – Trio: Un poco più lento, A minor 17:13

IV. Rondo: Allegro vivace, A minor 23:58

The first movement is in sonata form though with ambiguity over the material in the development and the beginning of the recapitulation.[1]

The second movement is in variation form. Noted performers of the work in the 19th century included Hans von Bülow, who played the sonata in both Europe and the USA.[2]

Daniel Coren has discussed the nature of the recapitulation in the first movement of this sonata.[3]

Wilhelm Kempff: piano

 

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Piotr Anderszewski: The complete “Diabelli Variations Op. 120” by Beethoven



Ludwig van Beethoven ( 1770-1827)

33 Variatons on a Waltz by A. Diabelli Op. 120:
I. Tema. Vivace
II. Alla marcia, maestoso
III. Poco allegro
IV. L’istesso tempo
V. Un poco piu vivace
VI. Allegro vivace
VII. Allegro ma non troppo e serioso
VIII. Un poco piu allegro
IX. Poco vivace
X. Allegro pesante e risoluto
XI. Presto
XII. Allegretto
XIII. Un poco piu moto
IV. Vivace
XV. Grave e maestoso
XVI. Presto scherzando
XVII. Allegro
XVIII. L’istesso tempo
XIX. Poco moderato
XX. Presto
XXI. Andante
XXII. Allegro con brio-Meno allegro
XXIII. Allegro molto alla “Notte e giorno faticar”
XXIV. Allegro assai
XXV. Fughetta. Andante
XXVI. Allegro
XXVII. Allegretto
XXVIII. Vivace
XXIX. Allegro
XXX. Adagio ma non troppo
XXXI. Andante sempre cantabile
XXXII. Largo, molto espressivo
XXXIII. Fuga. Allegro
XXXIV. Tempo di Minuetto moderato

Piotr Anderszewski-piano

Complete score: http://javanese.imslp.info/files/imgl…

The 33 Variations on a waltz by Anton Diabelli, Op. 120, commonly known as the Diabelli Variations, is a set of variations for the piano written between 1819 and 1823 by Ludwig van Beethoven on a waltz composed by Anton Diabelli. One of the supreme compositions for the piano, it often shares the highest honours with J.S. Bach’s Goldberg Variations.
The music writer Donald Tovey called it “the greatest set of variations ever written”. The pianist Alfred Brendel has described it as “the greatest of all piano works”. It also comprises, in the words of Hans von Bülow, “a microcosm of Beethoven’s art”. In Beethoven: The Last Decade 1817 — 1827, Martin Cooper writes, “The variety of treatment is almost without parallel, so that the work represents a book of advanced studies in Beethoven’s manner of expression and his use of the keyboard, as well as a monumental work in its own right”. In his Structural Functions of Harmony, Arnold Schoenberg writes that the Diabelli Variations “in respect of its harmony, deserves to be called the most adventurous work by Beethoven”.
Beethoven’s approach to the theme is to take some of its smallest elements — the opening turn, the descending fourth and fifth, the repeated notes — and build upon them pieces of great imagination, power and subtlety. Alfred Brendel wrote, “The theme has ceased to reign over its unruly offspring. Rather, the variations decide what the theme may have to offer them. Instead of being confirmed, adorned and glorified, it is improved, parodied, ridiculed, disclaimed, transfigured, mourned, stamped out and finally uplifted”.
Beethoven does not seek variety by using key-changes, staying with Diabelli’s C-major for most of the set: among the first twenty-eight variations, he uses the tonic minor only once. Then, nearing the conclusion, Beethoven uses the tonic minor for Variations 29–31 and for Variation 32, a triple fugue, he switches to E-flat major. Coming at this late point, after such a long period in C-major, the key-change has an increased dramatic effect. At the end of the fugue, a culminating flourish consisting of a diminished seventh arpeggio is followed by a series of quiet chords punctuated by silences. These chords lead back to Diabelli’s C-major for Variation 33, a closing minuet.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diabelli…

Buy the CD here: http://www.amazon.com/Piotr-Anderszew…