Tag Archives: Harvard University

this day in the yesteryear: First Pulitzer Prizes Awarded (1917)


First Pulitzer Prizes Awarded (1917)

The Pulitzer Prizes—prestigious awards presented annually by Columbia University for achievements in American journalism, literature, and music—were created by journalist and publisher Joseph Pulitzer, whose will funded the establishment of Columbia’s school of journalism as well as the prizes. Ironically, Columbia had rejected donation offers from Pulitzer during his lifetime because, as one of the originators of yellow journalism, he was regarded as unscrupulous. What do prizewinners receive? More… Discuss

picture of the day: W.E.B. Du Bois



W.E.B. Du Bois

William Edward Burghardt Du Bois was born on February 23, 1868, in Great Barrington, Massachusetts. W.E.B. Du Bois was the first African American to earn a doctorate from Harvard University. As a sociologist, he focused on the problem of race for blacks in the United States. He became an influential leader of black Americans, presenting an alternative to Booker T. Washington, whose policies Du Bois considered too conservative and too accommodating to whites. Du Bois, believing that blacks could achieve progress only through protest, encouraged black nationalism and supported Pan-Africanism. Du Bois also founded the Niagara Movement, served as the NAACP’s director of research and editor of its magazine Crisis, and taught and published his philosophy at Atlanta University. W.E.B. Du Bois died at the age of 95 in 1963.

Image: Library of Congress

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.RFxc4pyE.dpuf

SLEIGH RIDE John Williams & The Boston Pops (Live): Happy Christmas! (great compositions/performances) Learn more about Leroy Anderson here at euzicasa


SLEIGH RIDE John Williams & The Boston Pops (Live)

Banana Peels and Pork Strips Earn Ig Nobel Honors


Banana Peels and Pork Strips Earn Ig Nobel Honors

The winners of this year’s Ig Nobel Prizes have been announced, and included among them are a team studying the slipperiness of banana peels, another investigating the ability of pork strips to stop nosebleeds, and yet another gauging how reindeer react to humans in polar bear suits. The aforementioned honorees took home the physics, medicine, and arctic science prizes, respectively. The award in public health went to a team investigating whether it is mentally hazardous to own a cat, while the psychology award went to a team that found that night owls tend to be more psychopathic than early risers. Prizes were also awarded in several other categories. More…

Shocking Boredom Study


Shocking Boredom Study

Fifteen minutes may not seem like a terribly long time, but when left alone with just one’s thoughts for company, it is apparently unbearable, and many would sooner shock themselves than endure it. Nearly half of the participants in a recent study—18 of 42—elected to administer at least one mildly painful electric shock to themselves at some point during a 15-minute period in which they were left alone in an empty room and asked to sit at a table “entertaining themselves with their own thoughts.” Though some have criticized the study’s design, the researchers concluded that, on the whole, people prefer doing something, even something unpleasant, to doing nothing at all. More… Discuss

Laser Procedure Stimulates Tooth Tissue Growth


Laser Procedure Stimulates Tooth Tissue Growth

Lasers could someday be used to help repair teeth. Researchers were able to stimulate new dentin growth in the teeth of mice and rats after just a single dose of laser therapy. Dentin is the bonelike tissue surrounding the pulp cavity of a tooth and comprising the bulk of the tooth. This sort of procedure could not regenerate an entire tooth—it cannot rebuild enamel, the protective outer layer of tooth material, nor can it stimulate dentin regrowth if the pulp is necrotic—but it could, in some cases, allow people to avoid painful root canal procedures. More… Discuss

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: CHARLES WILLIAM ELIOT (1834)


Charles William Eliot (1834)

Eliot was an educator and the president of Harvard from 1869 to 1909. Under his administration, Harvard developed from a small college with attached professional schools into a great modern university. Several notable reforms were introduced during his tenure: the elective system was extended, the curriculum was enriched, written exams became mandatory, and the faculty was enlarged. Eliot opposed football and tried unsuccessfully to abolish the game at Harvard. Why did he object to the sport? More… Discuss

 

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: FACEBOOK IS LAUNCHED (2004)


Facebook Is Launched (2004)

With over a billion active users, Facebook is the most popular social networking site on the Web. Founded by Mark Zuckerberg in 2004 as a way to facilitate online communication between Harvard University students, the platform was a great success and was soon opened up to students at other colleges, then to high school students, and eventually to anyone in the world over the age of 13 with access to the Internet. What new words and word meanings have been added to the lexicon thanks to Facebook? More… Discuss

 

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William H. Gates III COL ’77, LLD ’07 Q&A | The Harvard Campaign Launch



Question and answer with Bill Gates at the launch of the Harvard Campaign.

Sanders Theater, September 21, 2013

Read more about The Harvard Campaign athttp://campaign.harvard.edu

 

Edvard Grieg – Lyric Suite / Suite Lyrique



Edvard Grieg (1843-1907), Norge

Lyric Suite, Op. 54

– Shepherd Boy
– Bell-Ringing
– Norwegian March
– Notturno
– March of the Trolls

Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra
Neeme Järvi

 

Today’s Birthday: MICHAEL CRICHTON (1942)


Michael Crichton (1942)

While pursuing a medical degree at Harvard University, the intensely private Crichton began writing novels under a pseudonym. He published The Andromeda Strain during his final year and went on to write several best-selling works, many of which were made into films, including Jurassic Park and Congo. He unexpectedly died of throat cancer in 2008. While in college, he once submitted an essay by George Orwell under his own name as an experiment. What grade did he receive? More… Discuss

Today’s Birthday: Annette Kellerman (1887)


Annette Kellerman (1887)

Kellerman was an Australian professional swimmer, vaudeville and film star, and writer. Her 1907 performance of “water ballet” is often credited with popularizing the sport of synchronized swimming. Kellerman was also known for advocating the right of women to wear one-piece bathing suits and was once famously arrested for indecency for doing so herself. In 1908, a Harvard University professor named her the “Perfect Woman” because of the similarity of her physical attributes to what figure? More… Discuss