Tag Archives: Haymarket affair

Today In History. What Happened This Day In History


SOMEWHERE IN TIME

SOMEWHERE IN TIME

Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

Today in History
May 7

558   The dome of the church of St. Sophia in Constantinople collapses. Its immediate rebuilding is ordered by Justinian.
1274   The Second Council of Lyons opens in France to regulate the election of the pope.
1429   Joan of Arc breaks the English siege of Orleans.
1525   The German peasants’ revolt is crushed by the ruling class and church.
1763   Indian chief Pontiac begins his attack on a British fort in present-day Detroit, Michigan.
1800   Congress divides the Northwest Territory into two parts. The western part will becomes the Indiana Territory and the eastern section remains the Northwest Territory.
1824   Beethoven’s “Ninth Symphony” premiers in Vienna.
1847   The American Medical Association is formed in Philadelphia.
1862   Confederate troops strike Union troops at the Battle of Eltham’s Landing in Virginia.
1864   The Battle of Wilderness ends with heavy losses to both sides.
1877   Indian chief Sitting Bull enters Canada with a trail of Indians after the Battle of Little Big Horn.
1915   The German submarine U-20 torpedoes the passenger ship Lusitiania, sinking her in 21 minutes with 1,978 people on board.
1937   The German Condor Legion arrives in Spain to assist Fransico Franco’s forces.
1942   In the Battle of the Coral Sea, Japanese and American navies attack each other with carrier-launched warplanes. It is the first time in the history of naval warfare where two fleets fought without seeing each other.Two crucial battles in 1942 marked the turning point of the war in the Pacific.
1943   The last major German strongholds in North Africa–Tunis and Bizerte–fall to Allied forces.
1945   Germany signs an unconditional surrender, effectively ending World War II in Europe.
1952   In Korea, Communist POWs at Koje-do riot against their American captors.
1954   French troops surrender to the Vietminh at Dien Bien Phu.
1958   Howard Johnson sets an aircraft altitude record in F-104.
1960   Leonid Brezhnev becomes president of the Soviet Union.
Born on May 7
1812   Robert Browning, English poet.
1833   Johannes Brahms, German composer.
1840   Peter Ilich Tchaikovsky, Russian composer.
1870   Marcus Loew, film executive, consolidated studios to create MGM.
1892   Josip Broz [Tito], leader of Yugoslavia during after World War II.
1892   Archibald MacLeish, American poet and statesman.
1901   Gary Cooper, film actor (High Noon, Friendly Persuasion).
1909   Edwin Herbert Land, inventor of the Poloroid Land Camera.
1919   Eva (Evita) Perón, first lady of Argentina.
1932   Jenny Joseph, English poet and novelist (The Thinking Heart, The Inland Sea).
1943   Peter Carey, Australian writer (Illywhacker, Oscar and Lucinda).

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/today-in-history#sthash.nPmBqJGM.dpuf

this day in the yesteryear: Haymarket Riot (1886)


English: Placard protesting police brutality a...

English: Placard protesting police brutality at a Shell to Sea protest, Bellanaboy, September 2007 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Haymarket Riot (1886)

This violent confrontation between Chicago police and labor protesters, which dramatized the labor movement’s struggle for recognition, began when a bomb was thrown into the police ranks at a gathering of radical unionists protesting police brutality against strikers. With seven officers dead and 60 wounded, the police opened fire on the crowd. Seven anarchist leaders were later sentenced to death. Why is their trial regarded as one of the most serious miscarriages of justice in US history? More… Discuss

LABOR DAY (from Wikipedia)


LABOR DAY

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

Labor Day in the United States is a holiday celebrated on the first Monday in September. It is a celebration of the American labor movement and is dedicated to the social and economic achievements of workers. It constitutes a yearly national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of their country.

Labor Day was promoted by the Central Labor Union and the Knights of Labor, who organized the first parade in New York City. After the Haymarket Massacre, which occurred in Chicago on May 4, 1886, U.S. President Grover Cleveland feared that commemorating Labor Day on May 1 could become an opportunity to commemorate the affair. Thus, in 1887, it was established as an official holiday in September to support the Labor Day that the Knights favored.[1]

The equivalent holiday in Canada, Labour Day, is also celebrated on the first Monday of September. In many other countries (more than 80 worldwide), “Labour Day” is synonymous with, or linked with, International Workers’ Day, which occurs on May 1.

History

In 1882, Matthew Maguire, a machinist, first proposed the holiday while serving as secretary of the CLU (Central Labor Union) of New York.[2] Others argue that it was first proposed by Peter J. McGuire of the American Federation of Labor in May 1882,[3] after witnessing the annual labour festival held in Toronto, Canada.[4] Oregon was the first state to make it a holiday on February 21, 1887. By the time it became a federal holiday in 1894, thirty states officially celebrated Labor Day.[3]

Following the deaths of a number of workers at the hands of the U.S. military and U.S. Marshals during the Pullman Strike, the United States Congress unanimously voted to approve rush legislation that made Labor Day a national holiday; President Grover Cleveland signed it into law a mere six days after the end of the strike.[5] The September date originally chosen by the CLU of New York and observed by many of the nation’s trade unions for the past several years was selected rather than the more widespread International Workers’ Day because Cleveland was concerned that observance of the latter would be associated with the nascent Communist, Syndicalist and Anarchist movements that, though distinct from one another, had rallied to commemorate the Haymarket Affair in International Workers’ Day.[6] All U.S. states, the District of Columbia, and the territories have made it a statutory holiday.

Labor Day
Labor Day New York 1882.jpg

Labor Day Parade, Union Square, New York, 1882
Observed by United States
Type Federal Holiday (federal government, DC and U.S. Territories); and State Holiday (in all 50 U.S. States)
Celebrations Parades, barbecues
Date First Monday in September
2013 date September 2
2014 date September 1
2015 date September 7
2016 date September 5
Frequency annual
Related to Labour Day