Tag Archives: Henry David Thoreau

Any nobleness begins at once to refine a man’s features, any meanness or sensuality to imbrute them. Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862)


Any nobleness begins at once to refine a man’s features, any meanness or sensuality to imbrute them.

Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) Discuss

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Great compositions/performances: Antonin Dvorak , String Quintet No. 3, In E Flat Major, Op 97, by Dvorak Quartet, with Josef Kodousesk, viola


Henry David Thoreau — ‘A lake is a landscape’s most beautiful and expressive feature. … ― Henry David Thoreau, Walden.

Antonin Dvorak,String Quintet No.3, In E Flat Major, Op 97(It is a Viola Quitet)

quotation: Ralph Waldo Emerson Walden by Henry David Thoreau (Full Audiobook)


The days…come and go like muffled and veiled figures sent from a distant friendly party, but they say nothing, and if we do not use the gifts they bring, they carry them as silently away.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882) Discuss

Walden by Henry David Thoreau (Full Audiobook)

word: bombast


bombast

Definition: (noun) Grandiloquent, pompous speech or writing.
Synonyms: claptrap, fustian
Usage: He found that he could look back upon the brass and bombast of his earlier gospels and see them truly. Discuss.

quotation: You must live in the present, launch yourself on every wave, find your eternity in each moment. Henry David Thoreau


You must live in the present, launch yourself on every wave, find your eternity in each moment.

Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) Discuss

quotation: Henry David Thoreau (above morality by points)


Do not be too moral. You may cheat yourself out of much life so. Aim above morality. Be not simply good; be good for something.

Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) Discuss

quotation: There is no remedy for love but to love more. Henry David Thoreau


There is no remedy for love but to love more.

Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) Discuss

QUOTATION: Henry David Thoreau


If you have built castles in the air, your work need not be lost; that is where they should be. Now put the foundations under them.

Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) Discuss

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QUOTATION: Henry David Thoreau


Books, not which afford us a cowering enjoyment, but in which each thought is of unusual daring; such as an idle man cannot read, and a timid one would not be entertained by, which even make us dangerous to existing institution–such call I good books.

Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: Henry David Thoreau


I am as desirous of being a good neighbor as I am of being a bad subject.

Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: Henry David Thoreau


I heartily accept the motto, “That government is best which governs least”; and I should like to see it acted up to more rapidly and systematically.

Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: Henry David Thoreau ABOUT EVIL


There are a thousand hacking at the branches of evil to one who is striking at the root.

Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) Discuss

 

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Quotation: Henry David Thoreau about undue respect for a law


A common and natural result of an undue respect for the law is, that you may see a file of soldiers … marching in admirable order over hill and dale to the wars, against their wills, ay, against their common sense and consciences.

Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) Discuss

Quotation: Henry David Thoreau about fate when owning your own opinion (or labeling by public opinion)


Public opinion is a weak tyrant compared with our own private opinion. What a man thinks of himself, that it is which determines, or rather indicates, his fate.

Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) Discuss

Quotation: Henry David Thoreau about our place in the world (what it should be…)


I came into this world, not chiefly to make this a good place to live in, but to live in it, be it good or bad.

Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) Discuss

 

Quotation: Ralph Waldo Emerson about flattery


We love flattery even though we are not deceived by it, because it shows that we are of importance enough to be courted.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882) Discuss

 

QUOTATION: Henry David Thoreau


Most of the luxuries, and many of the so-called comforts of life, are not only not indispensable, but positive hindrances to the elevation of mankind.

Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) Discuss

 

Quotation: Henry David Thoreau about being “men first, and subjects afterwards”!


Must the citizen ever for a moment, or in the least degree, resign his conscience to the legislator? Why has every man a conscience then? I think that we should be men first, and subjects afterward.

Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) Discuss

 

Quotation: Henry David Thoreau about Unjust laws


Unjust laws exist: shall we be content to obey them, or shall we endeavor to amend them, and obey them until we have succeeded, or shall we transgress them at once?

Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) Discuss

 

Quotation: Henry David Thoreau about a better govenment


To speak practically and as a citizen, unlike those who call themselves no-government men, I ask for, not at once no government, but at once a better government.

Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) Discuss

Henry David Thoreau


Shall a man go and hang himself because he belongs to the race of pygmies, and not be the biggest pygmy that he can? Let every one mind his own business, and endeavor to be what he was made.

Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) Discuss

Quotation: Henry David Thoreau


A very few—as heroes, patriots, martyrs, reformers in the great sense, and men—serve the state with their consciences also, and so necessarily resist it for the most part; and they are commonly treated as enemies by it.

Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) Discuss

Quotation: Henry David Thoreau on respect for the right, rather than law


It is not desirable to cultivate a respect for the law, so much as for the right.

Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) Discuss

Quotation: HENRY DAVID THOREAU on the way we fail to treat each other appropriately (tenderly).


1967 U.S. postage stamp honoring Henry David T...

1967 U.S. postage stamp honoring Henry David Thoreau. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“The finest qualities of our nature, like the bloom on fruits, can be preserved only by the most delicate handling. Yet we do not treat ourselves nor one another thus tenderly.”

Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) Discuss

Quotation: Henry David Thoreau on inventions as minor toys, and improved means to an unimproved end.


Our inventions are wont to be pretty toys, which distract our attention from serious things. They are but improved means to an unimproved end.Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) Discus

Henry David Thoreau on the trade is always between attachments (what keeps one busy, keeps one in bondage!)


Most men, even in this comparatively free country, through mere ignorance and mistake, are so occupied with the factitious cares and superfluously coarse labors of life that its finer fruits cannot be plucked by them.

Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) Discuss

“What keeps one busy, keeps one in bondage!”

George-B

Quotation of the Day: Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) – On human as social being


 

I have never felt lonesome, or in the least oppressed by a sense of solitude, but once, and that was a few weeks after I came to the woods, when, for an hour, I doubted if the near neighborhood of man was not essential to a serene and healthy life.

Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) Discuss

Today’s Birthday: Milton Berle (1908)


Milton Berle (1908)

Berle was an American comedian and the first major US television star. He began acting in vaudeville at age 10 and went on to perform in more than 50 silent films, on radio, and as a nightclub comedian. His great success, however, was as the host of NBC’s Texaco Star Theater, which earned him the nickname “Mr. Television.” He contributed significantly to the medium’s growing popularity, and many are said to have bought TV sets just to watch “Uncle Miltie.” How did he get that nickname? More… Discuss