Tag Archives: Herbert von Karajan

historic musical bits: Claude Debussy: La Mer; Philharmonia Orchestra, Herbert von Karajan (1953)


Claude Debussy: La Mer; Philharmonia Orchestra, Herbert von Karajan (1953)

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Historic musical bits: Bedřich Smetana : “Die Moldau” / Karajan / Vienna Philharmonic


 Bedřich Smetana : “Die Moldau” / Karajan / Vienna Philharmonic

historic musical bits: Arthur Rubinstein – Chopin – Piano Concerto No 2 in F minor, Op 21/ London Symphony Orchestra André Previn, conductor Classical Vault 2 Classical Vault 2


Arthur Rubinstein – Chopin – Piano Concerto No 2 in F minor, Op 21

MIssa for Sunday, May 17, 2015: Beethoven – Missa Solemnis – Philharmonia / Karajan


Beethoven – Missa Solemnis – Philharmonia / Karajan

great compositions/performances: Claudio Abbado “Overture “The Fair Melusina” Mendelssohn


Claudio Abbado “Overture “The Fair Melusina” Mendelssohn

LISZT Orchestral Hungarian Rhapsody No 4, Herbert von Karajan / Berliner Philharmoniker


LISZT Orchestral Hungarian Rhapsody No 4

Best Classical Music: Beethoven “Symphony No 8” Karajan (London, 20.V.1955), great compositions/performances


Beethoven “Symphony No 8” Karajan

historical musical bits (1985): Bedřich Smetana : “Die Moldau” / Karajan / Vienna Philharmonic, great compositions/performances


Bedřich Smetana : “Die Moldau” / Karajan / Vienna Philharmonic

Historic musical Bits: Brahms / Herbert von Karajan, 1957: Variations On A Theme By Haydn, Op. 56a , great compositions/performances


Brahms / Herbert von Karajan, 1957: Variations On A Theme By Haydn, Op. 56a – Complete

Giuseppe Verdi – Macbeth – Ballabili (Dances from Act III)


Giuseppe Verdi – Macbeth – Ballabili (Dances from Act III)

Claude Debussy: La Mer; Philharmonia Orchestra, Herbert von Karajan , great compositions/performances


Claude Debussy: La Mer; Philharmonia Orchestra, Herbert von Karajan

Antonín Dvořák – Symphony No. 9 in E Minor “From the New World” By Von Karajan: great compositions/performances


Antonín Dvořák – Symphony No. 9 in E Minor “From the New World” By Von Karajan

Movements:

1. Adagio, 4/8 — Allegro molto, 2/4, E minor
2. Largo, common time, D-flat major, then later C-sharp minor
3. Scherzo: Molto vivace — Poco sostenuto, 3/4, E minor
4. Allegro con fuoco, common time, E minor, ends in E major
Sinfonia n.º 9 (Dvořák)
A Sinfonia Nº. 9 em Mi menor Op. 95 Sinfonia do Novo Mundo
Symfonie č. 9 (Dvořák), Symfonie č.9, e-moll, op. 95 Antonína Dvořáka

Instrumentation
This symphony is scored for an orchestra of the following:
2 flutes (one doubling piccolo)
2 oboes (one doubling on English horn)
2 clarinets in A and B♭ (B♭ in movement 2)
2 bassoons
4 horns in E, C and F
2 trumpets in E, C and E♭
2 tenor trombones
bass trombone
tuba (second movement only)
timpani
triangle (third movement only)
cymbals (fourth movement only)
strings
Symphony No. 9 (Dvořák)

Antonin Dvorak – Rusalka – Song To The Moon: make music part of your life series


Antonin Dvorak – Rusalka – Song To The Moon

A Thanksgiving Present for all my friends #euzicasa: Dvořák: Symphony No. 9 “From The New World” / Karajan · Vienna Philharmonic


Dvořák: Symphony No. 9 “From The New World” / Karajan · Vienna Philarmonic

Antonín Dvořák Symphony No 8 [No 4] G major Karajan Wiener Philarmoniker: great compositions/performances


Antonín Dvořák Symphony No 8 [No 4] G major Karajan Wiener Philarmoniker

Claude Debussy: La Mer; Philharmonia Orchestra, Herbert von Karajan: great compositions/performances


Ludwig van Beethoven: Symphony no. 8 in F Major, Op 93: great compositions/performances


Ludwig van Beethoven: Symphony no.8 in F Major,  Op 93

Dvořák: Symphony No. 9 “From The New World” / Karajan · Vienna Philarmonic : great compositions/performances


Dvořák: Symphony No. 9 “From The New World” / Karajan · Vienna Philarmonic

Schubert – Symphony no. 8 in B minor D 759 “Unfinished” (KARAJAN – Philarmonia Orchestra): great compositions/performances


Schubert – Symphony no. 8 in B minor D 759 “Unfinished” (KARAJAN – Philarmonia Orchestra)

Beethoven Namensfeier Overture in C major, Op.115: make music part of your life series


FROM:

Beethoven Namensfeier Overture in C major, Op.115

Ludwig van Beethoven (1770 † 1827)

Work: Namensfeier ‘Name-Day Celebration‘ Overture in C major, Op.115

Movement: Maestoso – Allegro assai vivace

Herbert von Karajan
Berliner Philharmoniker Orchestra

Mozart – Requiem By Herbert von Karajan (Full HD) (Full Concert): great compositions/performances


Mozart – Requiem By Herbert von Karajan (Full HD) (Full Concert)

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Herbert von Karajan Full HD 1080p Full Concert Soundtrack Complete Requiem greatest concert memorable The Requiem Mass in D minor (K. 626) by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was composed in Vienna in 1791 and left unfinished at the composer’s death on December 5. A completion by Franz Xaver Süssmayr was delivered to Count Franz von Walsegg, who had anonymously commissioned the piece for a requiem Mass to commemorate the February 14 anniversary of his wife’s death.
It is one of the most enigmatic pieces of music ever composed, mostly because of the myths and controversies surrounding it, especially around how much of the piece was completed by Mozart before his death. The autograph manuscript shows the finished and orchestrated introit in Mozart’s hand, as well as detailed drafts of the Kyrie and the sequence Dies Irae as far as the first nine bars of “Lacrimosa”, and the offertory. It cannot be shown to what extent Süssmayr may have depended on now lost “scraps of paper” for the remainder; he later claimed the Sanctus and Agnus Dei as his own. Walsegg probably intended to pass the Requiem off as his own composition, as he is known to have done with other works. This plan was frustrated by a public benefit performance for Mozart’s widow Constanze. A modern contribution to the mythology is Peter Shaffer‘s 1979 play Amadeus, in which the mysterious messenger with the commission is the masked Antonio Salieri who intends to claim authorship for himself.
The Requiem is scored for 2 basset horns in F, 2 bassoons, 2 trumpets in D, 3 trombones (alto, tenor & bass), timpani (2 drums), violins, viola and basso continuo (cello, double bass, and organ). The vocal forces include soprano, contralto, tenor, and bass soloists and a SATB mixed choir.

today’s birthday: Nicolai Gedda (1925)


Nicolai Gedda (1925)

Gedda is a famed Swedish tenor known for his vocal control. He has made some 200 recordings and is said to be the most recorded tenor in history. In 1952, he made his debut at the Royal Swedish Opera and went on to collaborate with conductor Herbert von Karajan. Gedda then went to Italy and gained international fame, performing all over the world at venues such as the Paris Opera and the Metropolitan Opera. How did Gedda go from being a bank teller to a world-famous tenor? More… Discuss

great compositions/performances: Mussorgsky: Pictures at an exhibition ( Full ) – BPO / Karajan*


[youtube.com/watch?v=kkC3chi_ysw]

Mussorgsky: Pictures at an exhibition ( Full ) – BPO / Karajan*

Herbert Von Karajan for PIFAL

Herbert Von Karajan for PIFAL (Photo credit: Arturo Espinosa)

With the original survived pictures of Hartmann and others

make music part of your life series: Smetana – Die Moldau (Karajan and the Berlin Philarmonic Orchestra)


[youtube.com/watch?v=gTKsHwqaIr4]

Smetana – Die Moldau (Karajan)

Historic Musical Moments: Beethoven / Herbert von Karajan, 1952: Symphony No. 8 in F Major, Op. 93 – VPO, Entre LP


[youtube.com/watch?v=Soe8aJ3EAJk]

Beethoven / Herbert von Karajan, 1952: Symphony No. 8 in F Major, Op. 93 – VPO, Entre LP

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Tomaso Albinoni (1671-1751) Adagio in G minor for Strings and Organ p.1


[youtube.com/watch?v=ldYUH2i0cf8]

Tomaso Albinoni

Tomaso Albinoni (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Tomaso Albinoni (1671-1751) Adagio in G minor for Strings and Organ p.1

Berliner Philharmoniker Herbert von Karajan
David Bell, Orgel – Leon Spierer, Violine

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Wagner -Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Prelude and Liebestod from ‘Tristan Und Isolde’ (Karajan-BPO-Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra)



From  the Author-DjangoMan1963:  “This is my personal vote for the greatest piece of music ever.
The version here is by the Berlin Philharmonic, conducted by the late, great Herbert Von Karajan.

The jewish coductor Daniel Barenboim aptly said: “The music is bigger than the man”. Anyone who dismisses Wagner’s music on the basis of his views as a man, is missing something truly wonderful.

I’ve chosen Karajan’s version because he gets the tempo and the feel just right. Not too much vibratro here, which other conductors sometimes bring to the piece, making it sound too overwrought. He gets it spot on. A touch of vibrato, but he let’s the notes speak for themselves, whilst the languid tempo evokes a mystical atmosphere to the piece.

I hope you enjoy this wonderful music.”

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
Richard Wagner
Photo of Wagner

Tristan und Isolde (Tristan and Isolde, or Tristan and Isolda, or Tristran and Ysolt) is an opera, or music drama, in three acts by Richard Wagner to a German libretto by the composer, based largely on the romance by Gottfried von Straßburg. It was composed between 1857 and 1859 and premiered in Munich on 10 June 1865 with Hans von Bülow conducting. Wagner referred to the work not as an opera, but called it “eine Handlung” (literally a drama. a plot or an action), which was the equivalent of the term used by the Spanish playwright Calderón for his dramas.
Wagner’s composition of Tristan und Isolde was inspired by the philosophy of Arthur Schopenhauer (particularly The World as Will and Representation) and his affair with Mathilde Wesendonck. Widely acknowledged as one of the peaks of the operatic repertory, Tristan was notable for Wagner’s unprecedented use of chromaticismtonality, orchestral colour and harmonic suspension.
The opera was inexorably influential among Western classical composers and provided direct inspiration to composers such as Gustav MahlerRichard StraussKarol SzymanowskiAlban BergArnold Schönberg and Benjamin Britten. Other composers like Claude DebussyMaurice Ravel and Igor Stravinsky formulated their styles in contrast to Wagner’s musical legacy. Many see Tristan as the beginning of the move away from common practice harmony and tonality and consider that it lays the groundwork for the direction of classical music in the 20th century.[1] Both Wagner’s libretto style and music were also profoundly influential on the Symbolist poets of the late 19th Century and early 20th Century.[2]

Composition history

Wagner was forced to abandon his position as conductor of the Dresden Opera in 1849, as there was a warrant posted for his arrest for his participation in the unsuccessfulMay Revolution. He left his wife, Minna, in Dresden, and fled to Zürich. There, in 1852, he met the wealthy silk trader Otto Wesendonck. Wesendonck became a supporter of Wagner and bankrolled the composer for several years. Wesendonck’s wife, Mathilde, became enamoured of the composer. Though Wagner was working on his epic Der Ring des Nibelungen, he found himself intrigued by the legend of Tristan and Iseult.

The re-discovery of mediæval Germanic poetry, including Gottfried von Strassburg‘s version of Tristan, the Nibelungenlied and Wolfram von Eschenbach‘s Parzival, left a large impact on the German Romantic movements during the mid-19th century. The story of Tristan and Isolde is a quintessential romance of the Middle Ages and theRenaissance. Several versions of the story exist, the earliest dating to the middle of the 12th century. Gottfried’s version, part of the “courtly” branch of the legend, had a huge influence on later German literature.[3]

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Great Compositions/Performances: Mozart Symphony No 40 G minor K 550 Karl Bohm Wiener Philarmoniker



Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Symphony No 40 G minor K 550Karl Bhom conducts Wiener Philarmoniker:

 

 

 

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

 

Molto allegro 0:40
Andante 9:42
Menuetto, allegretto 17:25
Finale, allegro assai 22:05

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart wrote his Symphony No. 40 in G minor, KV. 550, in 1788. It is sometimes referred to as the “Great G minor symphony,” to distinguish it from the “Little G minor symphony,” No. 25. The two are the only extant minor key symphonies Mozart wrote.[1]

 

 

 

 

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GREAT COMPOSITIONS/PERFORMANCES: Dvořák: Symphony No. 9 “From The New World” / Karajan · Vienna Philarmonic



Great presentation of the Great Wiener Philharmoniker conducted by Herbert von Karajan, playing the 9th Symphony of Antonin Dvorak “From the new world”. 

Gran presentación de la Filarmónica de Viena conducida por Herbert von Karajan, interpretando la novena sinfonía de Antonin Dvorak “Sinfonía del Nuevo Mundo”.

(C) Telemonde 1992, UMG and all their respective owners. No commercial use of this material.

(0:37) 1st mvt (Adagio, Allegro Molto)
(10:42) 2nd mvt (Largo)
(23:30) 3rd mvt (Scherzo, Molto Vivace)
(32:07) 4rth mvt (Allegro con fuoco)

Related articles

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Great Composers/Compositions: Grieg – Holberg Suite, Op. 40 (”From Holberg’s Time”)



The Holberg Suite was originally composed for the piano and was adapted for string orchestra a year later. Not as famous as Peer Gynt, but seen by many critics as equal.
Berliner Philharmoniker / Herbert von Karajan
00:00 1. Praeludium
03:02 2. Sarabande 
07:18 3. Gavotte 
11:07 4. Air 
16:58 5. Rigaudon

 

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Great Performances: Herbert von Karajan conducts Richard Strauss’s – Don Juan Overture Op. 20 ( – Osaka 1984)



Richard Strauss:  Don Juan, Symphonic Poem Op. 20
Herbert von Karajan conducting
Osaka, Japan 1984

 

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FABULOUS COMPOSERS/COMPOSITIONS: Beethoven – Missa Solemnis – Philharmonia / Karajan



Ludwig van Beethoven

Missa Solemnis op.123

Kyrie 0:00
Gloria 11:12
Credo 28:33
Sanctus 50:54
Agnus Dei 01:07:59

Elisabeth Schwarzkopf
Christa Ludwig
Nicolai Gedda
Nicola Zaccaria
Singverein des Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde in Wien
Philharmonia Orchestra
Herbert von Karajan

Studio recording (11-15.IX.1958)

 Donald Tovey has connected Beethoven to the earlier tradition in a different way:

Not even Bach or Handel can show a greater sense of space and of sonority. There is no earlier choral writing that comes so near to recovering some of the lost secrets of the style of Palestrina. There is no choral and no orchestral writing, earlier or later, that shows a more thrilling sense of the individual colour of every chord, every position, and every doubled third or discord.
 

In this famous portrait of Beethoven byJoseph Karl Stieler, Beethoven can be seen working on the Missa solemnis in D major.

The Missa solemnis in D major, Op. 123 was composed by Ludwig van Beethoven from 1819 to 1823. It was first performed on 7 April 1824 in St. PetersburgRussia, under the auspices of Beethoven’s patron Prince Nikolai Galitzin; an incomplete performance was given in Vienna on 7 May 1824, when the Kyrie, Credo, and Agnus Dei were conducted by the composer.[1] It is generally considered to be one of the composer’s supreme achievements. Together with Bach’s Mass in B minor, it is the most significantMass setting of the common practice period.

Despite critical recognition as one of Beethoven’s great works from the height of his composing career,Missa solemnis has not achieved the same level of popular attention that many of his symphonies and sonatas have enjoyed.[citation needed] Written around the same time as his Ninth Symphony, it is Beethoven’s second setting of the Mass, after his Mass in C, Op. 86.

The Mass is scored for 2 flutes; 2 oboes, 2 clarinets (in A, C, and B♭); 2 bassoonscontrabassoon; 4horns (in D, E♭, B♭ basso, E, and G); 2 trumpets (D, B♭, and C); alto, tenor, and bass trombonetimpani;organ continuo; strings (violins I and II, violascellos, and basses); sopranoaltotenor, and bass soloists; and mixed choir.

Like most Masses, Beethoven’s Missa solemnis is in five movements:

  • Kyrie: Perhaps the most traditional of the Mass movements, the Kyrie is in a traditional ABA’ structure, with stately choral writing in the first movement section and more contrapuntal voice leading in the Christe, which also introduces the four vocal soloists.
  • Gloria: Quickly shifting textures and themes highlight each portion of the Gloria text, in a beginning to the movement that is almost encyclopedic in its exploration of 3/4 time. The movement ends with the first of the work’s two massive fugues, on the text “In gloria Dei patris. Amen”, leading into a recapitulation of the initial Gloria text and music.
  • Credo: One of the most remarkable movements to come from Beethoven’s pen opens with a chord sequence that will be used again in the movement to effect modulations. The Credo, like the Gloria, is an often disorienting, mad rush through the text. The poignant modal harmonies for the “et incarnatus” yield to ever more expressive heights through the “crucifixus”, and into a remarkable, a cappella setting of the “et resurrexit”that is over almost before it has begun. Most notable about the movement, though, is the closing fugue on “et vitam venturi” that includes one of the most difficult passages in the choral repertoire, when the subject returns at doubled tempo for a thrilling conclusion.
    The form of the Credo is divided into four parts: (I) allegro ma non troppo through “descendit de coelis” in B-flat; (II) “Incarnatus est” through”Resurrexit” in D; (III) “Et ascendit” through the Credo recapitulation in F; (IV) Fugue and Coda “et vitam venturi saeculi, amen” in B-flat.
  • Sanctus: Up until the benedictus of the Sanctus, the Missa solemnis is of fairly normal classical proportions. But then, after an orchestral preludio, a solo violin enters in its highest range — representing the Holy Spirit descending to earth — and begins the Missa’s most transcendently beautiful music, in a remarkably long extension of the text.
  • Agnus Dei: A setting of the plea “miserere nobis” (“have mercy on us”) that begins with the men’s voices alone in B minor yields, eventually, to a bright D-major prayer “dona nobis pacem” (“grant us peace”) in a pastoral mode. After some fugal development, it is suddenly and dramatically interrupted by martial sounds (a convention in the 18th century, as in Haydn‘s Missa in tempore belli), but after repeated pleas of “miserere!”,eventually recovers and brings itself to a stately conclusion.

 

Bruckner’s Symphony No.8 w/Karajan conducting “live” in St. Florian (1979)



This is perhaps THE most famous video recording of a Bruckner Symphony.
Many say Bruckner’s 8th is the mount Everest of all symphonies.
Recorded June 4th 1979, and filmed on location in the monastery church in St. Florian, Austria with Herbert von Karajan and the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra.

1st Movement starts at: 0:59
2nd Movement starts at: 17:16
3rd Movement starts at: 33:09
4th Movement starts at: 59:36

This video testament is extremely historically important because it helped solidify the international Brucknerfest in Linz after the opening of the new concert hall, the “Brucknerhaus” in 1974. Herbert von Karajan was the first famous international conductor to conduct a symphony in the Stiftskirche in St. Florian, which helped establish the reputation of the yearly festival to this day.

Karajan later in an interview related that he was given special access to Bruckner’s underground tomb located beneath the great organ, where he was alone with Bruckner’s sarcophagus for a lengthy amount of time before the performance.

On a side note:
Boulez’s video version IMO greatly pales in comparison to Karajan’s power, sensitivity and spirituality in this 1979 recording…even Karajan’s video remake in 1988 (in Vienna) does not come as close.

One musical scholar stated about this concert: 
“Massive, glowing and infused with cosmic power”.

…so thankfully we can now finally enjoy the performance COMPLETE, and not in chunks!

 

Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky – Symphony No. 5 in E minor, Op. 64



Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky – Symphony No. 5 in E minor, Op. 64
Wiener Philharmoniker Orchestra, Herbert von Karajan

 

Great Performances: ANTONIN DVORÁK – SINFONIE NO. 8 IN G-DUR OP. 88 – WIENER PHILHARMONIKER – HERBERT VON KARAJAN



I. Allegro con brio[0:06]
II. Adagio – [9:57]
III. Allegretto grazioso, molto vivace – [21:28]
IV. Allegro ma non troppo – [27:05]
Wiener Philharmoniker – 
Herbert von Karajan, Leitung –
Großer Musikvereinssaal Wien
Januar/Februar 1985

 

Bizet / Herbert von Karajan, 1958: L’Arlesienne Suite No. 2 – Intermezzo, Minuet, Farandole



Herbert von Karajan (1908-1989) leads the Philharmonia Orchestra in this 1958 recording of the Intermezzo, Minuet and Farandole from the L’Arlesienne Suite No. 2. I created this video from the LP depicted above, issued in 1958 on the Angel label, serial number S. 35618. All images in this video are taken from the LP label (3:47) and LP jacket (10:14), front and reverse. (An image of the reverse side of the jacket appears at the end of the video.)

Movement 2: Intermezzo
Movement 3: Minuet (5:17)
Movement 4: Farandole (9:23)

Movement 1: Pastorale – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q-fyBs…

More from this LP:

L’Arlesienne Suite No. 1 – Prelude (1): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xZKYXD…

L’Arlesienne Suite No. 1 – Minuet, Allegro giocoso (2):http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dFo-A0…

L’Arlesienne Suite No. 1 – Adagietto (3):http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Axb5e…

L’Arlesienne Suite No. 1 – Carillon (4): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M3FJJu…

Carmen, Suite No. 1 – Prelude, Act : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-iSqEy…

 

Richard Strauss – Don Juan op. 20 (Karajan – Osaka 1984)



Richard Strauss
Don Juan, Symphonic Poem Op. 20
Herbert von Karajan
Osaka, Japan 1984

Smetana – Die Moldau (Karajan)


Smetana – Die Moldau (Karajan)
Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra

Albinoni’s Adagio in G minor (Karajan)


Composer Tomaso Albinoni:  Adagio in G minor for strings and organ

Performer: Herbert von Karajan & Berliner Philharmoniker

ANTONIN DVORÁK – SINFONIE NO. 8 IN G-DUR OP. 88 – WIENER PHILHARMONIKER – HERBERT VON KARAJAN



I. Allegro con brio – [0:06]
II. Adagio – [9:57]
III. Allegretto grazioso, molto vivace – [21:28]
IV. Allegro ma non troppo – [27:05]
Wiener Philharmoniker – 
Herbert von Karajan, Leitung –
Großer Musikvereinssaal Wien
Januar/Februar 1985

Buy “Symphony No. 8 in G, Op. 88: IV. Allegro ma non troppo” on

Google PlayeMusiciTunesAmazonMP3

 

Herbert von Karajan conducts The Blue Danube Waltz



Herbert von Karajan conducts The Blue Danube Waltz by Johann Strauss Jr.

Buy “An der schönen blauen Donau, Op.314 – An der schönen blauen Donau, Op.314” on
AmazonMP3

Light Cavalry Overture (Suppé) – Herbert von Karajan [HQ]


Leichte Kavallerie (Light Cavalry) is an operetta in three acts by Franz von Suppé, with a libretto by Karl Costa. It was first performed in the Carltheater, Vienna on 21 March 1866.

Herbert von Karajan was an Austrian orchestra and opera conductor. To the wider world he was perhaps most famously associated with the Berlin Philharmonic, of which he was principal conductor for 35 years. Although his work was not universally admired, he is generally considered to have been one of the greatest conductors of all time, and he was a dominant figure in European classical music from the 1960s until his death. Part of the reason for this was the large number of recordings he made and their prominence during his lifetime. By one estimate he was the top-selling classical music recording artist of all time, having sold an estimated 200 million records. File:Zentralfriedhof,Suppe,Franz,von.jpg

Beethoven / Herbert von Karajan, 1954: Overture, “Leonora, No. 3” Op. 72a – Philharmonia Orchestra



Forty-six year old Herbert von Karajan (1908-1989) leads the Philharmonia Orchestra in this 1954 recording of the Leonora Overture, Op. 72A, by Beethoven. I created this video from the LP shown above, issued in 1954 on the Angel label, serial number 35097 (British pressing). Except for those of Beethoven and those from the 1954 Billboard magazine review (5:30) of this LP, all images used to create this video were taken from the LP label (6:13) and jacket (4:54). In order to remove all doubt in the minds of those listening to these works, I use such images to establish the credibility of the source of these and similarly rare and historic recordings. 

Zimerman plays Schubert Impromptu Op. 90 No. 1



Zimerman plays Schubert

Franz Schubert‘s Impromptus, Opp. 90 and 142 (posth.), are a series of pieces for solo piano composed in 1827 and first published during the composer‘s lifetime (or shortly thereafter) under that name. There are eight such Impromptus in total.

Three other unnamed piano compositions, written in May 1828, a few months before the composer’s death, are alternatively indicated as Impromptus or Klavierstücke (“piano pieces”).

The Impromptus are often considered companion pieces to the Six moments musicaux, and they are often recorded and published together.

It has been said that Schubert was deeply influenced in writing these pieces by the Impromptus, Op. 7, of Jan Václav Voříšek (1822) and by the music of Voříšek’s teacher Václav Tomášek.[1][2]
Biography

Zimerman was born in Zabrze, Poland, and studied at the University of Music in Katowice under Andrzej Jasiński. His career was launched when he won the 1975 Warsaw International Frederick Chopin Piano Competition. He performed with the Berlin Philharmonic conducted by Herbert von Karajan in 1976 and he made his debut in the United States with the New York Philharmonic in 1979. He has toured widely and made a number of recordings. Since 1996 he has taught piano at the Academy of Music in Basel, Switzerland.

Zimerman is best known for his interpretations of Romantic music, but has performed a wide variety of classical pieces as well. He has also been a supporter of contemporary music. For example, Witold Lutosławski wrote his piano concerto for Zimerman, who later recorded it. Amongst his best-known recordings are the piano concerti of Edvard Grieg and Robert Schumann with conductor Herbert von Karajan; the Brahms concerti with Leonard Bernstein, the piano concerti of Frédéric Chopin, one recording conducted by Carlo Maria Giulini and a later one conducted by himself at the keyboard; the Third, Fourth and Fifth Piano Concertos of Beethoven under Bernstein (Zimerman himself led the accompaniment of the Vienna Philharmonic from the keyboard in Beethoven’s First and Second Concertos); the first and second piano concerti of Rachmaninoff; the piano concerti of Franz Liszt with Seiji Ozawa, the piano concerti of Maurice Ravel with Pierre Boulez, and solo piano works by Frédéric Chopin, Franz Liszt, Claude Debussy and Franz Schubert.
(Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Krystian_Zimerman)