Tag Archives: History

Make Music Part of Your Life Series: John Adams – Common tones in simple time


Happy Birthday Mr. John Adams! 

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Felix Mendelssohn – Songs without Words – Op.53, No.1



Felix MendelssohnSongs without Words – Op.53, No.1
András Schiff
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TODAY’S HOLIDAY: SERBIA STATEHOOD DAY OF THE REPUBLIC


Serbia Statehood Day of the Republic

On February 15, 1804, Serbian patriot Djordje Petrovic Karadjordje led an uprising against the Turkish Ottoman Empire to gain independence. A second uprisingoccurred in 1815 and was successful; Serbia formally gained independence in 1829. In 2001, the Serbian Parliament declared February 15 a state holiday to commemorate the day that the first Serbian uprising began. A ceremony is held in Orasac to celebrate the uprising and first constitution (signed in 1835). The main celebrations include festive concerts, film and theater premiers, exhibitions, and many other events.More… Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: Henry James “Live all you can – it’s a mistake not to…”


Live all you can – it’s a mistake not to. It doesn’t so much matter what you do in particular, so long as you have your life. If you haven’t had that, what have you had?

Henry James (1843-1916) Discuss

 

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: LADY JANE GREY, “THE NINE DAYS’ QUEEN,” BEHEADED (1554)


Lady Jane Grey, “The Nine Days’ Queen,” Beheaded (1554)

A tragic figure in English history, Lady Jane Grey was a pretty, intelligent young girl whose life was cut short due to the political machinations of those closest to her. When she was just 15, she was wed to the son of a duke. Her father-in-law then persuaded the dying King Edward VI, still a boy himself, to name Lady Jane his successor. She reigned for just nine days before stepping down. Though she was convicted of high treason, she might never have been executed had her father not done what? More… Discuss

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ARTICLE: THE BALLISTA


The Ballista

The ballista is an ancient missile launcher designed to hurl long arrows or heavy balls. The largest could accurately hurl 60-pound (27-kg) weights up to about 500 yards (450 m). The Greek version was basically a huge crossbow, while the Roman ballista was powered by torsion and used two separate arms joined at their ends by the cord that propelled the missile. Once the Roman Empire declined, so too did the ballista—it was too challenging and expensive to build. Which weapons took its place? More… Discuss

 

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Haïku – Destiny, by George -B


Haïku – Destiny, by George -B

First the body dies
then it’s moved six feet under
headstone falls over.

 

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Eddie Vedder – No More (video)


[youtube.com/watch?v=qqPzS8Y27Ks]

EDDIE VEDDER LYRICS

“No More”

I speak for a man who gave for this land
Took a bullet in the back for his pay
Spilled his blood in the dirt and the dust
He’s back to say:What he has seen is hard to believe
And it does no good to just pray
He asks of us to stand
And we must end this war todayWith his mind, he’s saying, “No more!”
With his heart, he’s saying, “No more!”
With his life he’s saying, “No more war!”With his eyes, he’s saying, “No more!”
With his body, he’s saying, “No more!”
With his voice, he’s saying, “No more war!”

Yeah, nothing’s too good for a veteran
Yeah, this is what they say
So nothing is what they will get
In this new American way

The lies we were told to get us to go
Were criminal … let us be straight
Let’s get to the point where our voices get heard
And I know what I’ll say

With our minds, we’re saying, “No more!”
With our hearts, we’re saying, “No more!”
With our lives, we’re saying, “No more war!”

With our eyes, we’re saying, “No more!”
With our voices, we’re saying, “No more!”
With our bodies, we’re saying, “No more war!”

No more innocents dying
No more terrorizing
No more eulogizing
No more
No more evangelizing
No more
No more presidents lying
No more war

With our minds, we’re saying, “No more!”
With our hearts, we’re saying, “No more!”
With our lives, we’re saying, “No more war!”

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Eddie Vedder (born Edward Louis Severson; December 23, 1964) is an American musician andsinger-songwriter[2] who is best known for being the lead vocalist and one of three guitarists of thealternative rock band Pearl Jam. Known for his powerful vocals, he has been ranked at #7 on a list of “Best Lead Singers of All Time”, compiled by Rolling Stone.[3] He is also involved in soundtrack work and contributes to albums by other artists. In 2007, Vedder released his first solo album as asoundtrack for the film Into the Wild (2007). His second album, Ukulele Songs, along with a live DVD titled Water on the Road, was released on 31 May 2011.[4]

Eddie Vedder
EddieVedder.jpg

Vedder on October 22, 2006
Background information
Birth name Edward Louis Severson III
Also known as Edward Mueller, Jerome Turner, Wes C. Addle
Born December 23, 1964 (age 49)
Evanston, Illinois, United States
Genres Alternative rockfolk rock,grungehard rock
Occupations Musiciansongwriter
Instruments Main: Vocals Occasional: guitar,harmonicatambourineOther: mandolinmandola,ukulelekeyboardsaccordion,bass guitardrums
Years active 1979–present
Labels Universal Republic Records
Republic Records,MonkeywrenchJ Records
Associated acts Pearl JamGlen HansardBad RadioTemple of the Dog,Hovercraft7 Worlds Collide, C Average, Jimmy FallonNeil Young
Notable instruments
Fender Telecaster
Schecter PT Model
Gibson SG
Gibson SG Jr.
Martin 0–18
Earnest Instruments Tululele, Custom Ukulele[1]

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IN THE YESTERYEAR: QUEEN VICTORIA CREATES THE VICTORIA CROSS (1856)


Queen Victoria Creates the Victoria Cross (1856)

Queen Victoria created the Victoria Cross—the highest British military award for valor—on January 29, 1856, in the late stages of the Crimean War. The impetus for a new medal arose during the war—one of the first with modern reporting—as correspondents documented many acts of bravery by British servicemen that went unrewarded. Thus, Victoria instituted her eponymous award for acts of devotion and valor in the presence of the enemy. From what was the Victoria Cross originally made? More…Discuss

 

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THE DIAMOND SUTRA


The Diamond Sutra

The Diamond Sutra is a Buddhist wisdom text. Written in the form of a dialogue between the Buddha Gautama and a questioning disciple, it emphasizes the fleeting nature of the material world and posits that enlightenment cannot be achieved through rational thought. A wood block-printed copy of the sutra held at the British Library is the earliest known printed text with a date—868 CE—predating the Gutenberg Bible by about 587 years. The copy, in scroll form, is roughly how many feet long? More… Discuss

British Library: Psalms in English verse (girdle book) )visit the library – widget)


Binding

Author John Croke (translator)
Title Psalms in English verse (girdle book)
Origin England, S. E. (London)
Date c. 1540
Language English
Script Gothic cursive
Decoration 1 miniature of Henry VIII, in colours and gold (f. 1v). Small initials plain in silver on red grounds or in gold on blue grounds.
Dimensions in mm 40 x 30 (30 x 20)
Official foliation ff. 104 (+ 1 original parchment double-leaf, glued together, at the beginning, and 1 at the end)
Form Parchment codex
Binding Pre-1600. Original worked gilt covers (metalwork) with clasp and girdle loops.
Provenance ? Anne Boleyn (born c. 1500, d. 1536), queen of England, second consort of Henry VIII: The volume corresponds with one described in George Wyat, Extracts from the Life of Queen Anne Boleigne: Written at the close of the XVIth century, and now first printed (London: [privately printed], 1817), p. 29; Wyat notes that it was traditionally said to have been given by Anne Boleyn, when on the scaffold, to one of her maids of honour, a lady of the family of Wyat. 
? George Wyat, 1817: see above, where he states that the described volume is in his possession.
Richard Temple-Nugent-Brydges-Chandos-Grenville (b. 1776, d. 1839), 1st duke of Buckingham and Chandos, of Stowe House, near Buckingham: inscribed with the press-mark ‘Appendix in vol. 1 … no. 27’ (f. ), corresponding to his catalogue (O’Conor 1818-1819).
Richard Plantagenet Temple-Nugent-Brydges-Chandos-Grenville (b. 1797, d. 1861), 2nd duke of Buckingham and Chandos; sold in 1849 to Lord Ashburnham.
Bertram Ashburnham (b. 1797, d. 1878), 4th earl of Ashburnham, of Ashburnham Place, Sussex.
Bertram Ashburnham (b. 1840, d. 1913), 5th earl of Ashburnham: purchased by the British Museum from him together with 1084 other Stowe manuscripts in 1883.

King Henry VIII

TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: PÍO BAROJA Y NESSI (1872)


Pío Baroja y Nessi (1872)

Considered the foremost Spanish novelist of his time, Baroja was part of the Generation of ’98, a group of writers who, in the face of defeat in the Spanish-American War, proclaimed a moral and cultural rebirth for Spain. He wrote almost 100 novels, including 11 trilogies and, perhaps his most ambitious project, a 22-volume cycle about a 19th-century insurgent. Baroja’s writings largely concern the intellectual and political climate of his homeland. What career did he give up to be a writer? More…Discuss

 

TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: MANUELA SÁENZ (1797)


Manuela Sáenz (1797)

Until recently, Sáenz’s contributions to the South American independence movement were largely overlooked. For eight years, she dedicated herself to the cause—and to her lover, revolutionary leader Simón Bolívar, whom she once saved from an assassination attempt. For that, he nicknamed her Libertadora del Libertador, or Liberator of the Liberator. Bolívar’s death in 1830 left Sáenz vulnerable to his opponents, and she was exiled and left destitute. What honor was she accorded in 2010? More…Discuss

 

THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: LARGEST MASS EXECUTION IN US HISTORY (1862)


Largest Mass Execution in US History (1862)

Though the US government and the Sioux concluded several treaties during the first half of the 19th century, relations had deteriorated by 1862 when a Sioux uprising killed more than 800 white settlers and soldiers in Minnesota. Military tribunals convicted 303 Sioux prisoners of murder and rape and sentenced them to death. US President Abraham Lincoln commuted most sentences, but the public hanging of 38 prisoners was still the largest mass execution in US history. What became of the bodies? More… Discuss

 

Today’s Birthday: GEORGES-MARIE GUYNEMER (1894)


Georges-Marie Guynemer (1894)

A top French fighter ace during World War I and a national hero, Guynemer shot down 53 enemy planes and survived being shot down several times before he presumably died in a firefight on September 11, 1917. During an engagement that fateful day, Guynemer’s plane disappeared, reportedly shot down by a German pilot who was himself killed in action weeks later. To ease the blow of the loss of their young hero, French schoolchildren were taught that what had happened to him? More…

 

QUOTATION: Sophocles ABOUT LIVING AND LEARNING (BLOGGING: DOES IT QUALIFY?)


Though a man be wise, it is no shame for him to live and learn.

Sophocles (496 BC-406 BC) Discuss

ECLECTICISM


Eclecticism

In eclecticism, a concept used in many disciplines, elements from diverse styles are selected and combined into a single system. The term “eclectic” can describe artists who combine, for example, elements from the Renaissance and classical traditions in their paintings. It can also be applied to philosophers who take elements from different systems of thought without regard for possible contradictions. In this way, the term is sometimes used pejoratively. What musicians are considered eclectic?More… Discuss

 

La Vida Breve, Manuel de Falla



Show: Entre Familia y Flamenco 
Academia de Baile Español de Juanita Franco. San Diego, CA
Sat April 10th. 2010

 

This Day in the Yesteryear: THE ROYAL AIR FORCE SINKS GERMAN BATTLESHIP TIRPITZ (1944)


The Royal Air Force Sinks German Battleship Tirpitz (1944)

The German Tirpitz, sister ship of the similarly ill-fatedBismarck, was the largest battleship ever built in Europe. Though she was sent to waters around German-occupied Norway and never really saw action in World War II, her mere presence threatened Allied convoys and tied up their naval resources. The Allies therefore launched numerous attacks on the Tirpitz in an effort to destroy her. After the Allies succeeded, her armor plates were supposedly repurposed for what use?More… Discuss

 

This Day in the Yesteryear: PUBLISHING MAGNATE ROBERT MAXWELL DIES MYSTERIOUSLY AT SEA (1991)


Publishing Magnate Robert Maxwell Dies Mysteriously at Sea (1991)

A Czechoslovakian Jew, Maxwell fled to the UK during World War II and joined the British army. After the war, he purchased publishing house Pergamon Press. The company’s success helped him win election to Parliament in 1964, but a 1969 financial scandal cost him control of Pergamon and his political career. He regained control of the company in 1974 and rejuvenated and expanded his empire. What did investigators discover about Maxwell’s business dealings after his mysterious drowning death? More… Discuss

 

ATONALITY


Atonality

Musical compositions that do not use an established musical key are said to be atonal. Atonality is a radical alternative to the diatonic system—the natural major or minor scales that form the basis of the key system in Western music. After World War I, an atonal system of composing emerged using 12 tones. By World War II, however, “atonality” had become a pejorative term to condemn music perceived as lacking structure and coherence. In Nazi Germany, atonal music was also criticized as what? More…

 

Today’s Birthday: MARIE OF EDINBURGH, QUEEN OF ROMANIA (1875)


Marie of Edinburgh, Queen of Romania (1875)

No ordinary queen, Marie took an active role in Romania‘s wartime activities, beginning with helping bring the country into the Allied camp in World War I and ending with her representation of Romanian interests in territory negotiations at the close of the war. In the interim, the “Soldier Queen” also contributed to the war effort by volunteering as a nurse with the Red Cross and publishing a book whose proceeds went to the same cause. Marie later became the first royal adherent of what faith? More…Discuss

 

This Day in the Yesteryear: 11-YEAR-OLD GRACE BEDELL URGES ABRAHAM LINCOLN TO GROW A BEARD (1860)


11-Year-Old Grace Bedell Urges Abraham Lincoln to Grow a Beard (1860)

A few weeks before Abraham Lincoln was elected president of the US, 11-year-old Grace Bedell sent him a letter urging him to grow a beard to win over voters. Bedell claimed that “all the ladies like whiskers” and would urge their husbands to vote for a bearded Lincoln. Days later, Lincoln drafted a noncommittal response in which he wondered whether such a change in appearance would be well received. Within months, he was sporting his now-iconic beard. What did he say when he later met Bedell? More…Discuss

 

Today’s Birthday: RUTH ELLIS (1926)


Ruth Ellis (1926)

Ellis has the notorious distinction of being the last woman executed in the UK. In 1955, a jury took just 14 minutes to convict her of murdering her lover, racecar driver David Blakely. The two had had a volatile relationship, and Ellis had previously suffered a miscarriage as a result of a punch to the stomach from Blakely, but this mattered little after she admitted openly in court that she had shot him with the intention of killing him. In what film does Ellis have an uncredited cameo? More… Discuss

Quotation: Ambrose Bierce about revolutions’ beneficiaries


Revolutions are usually accompanied by a considerable effusion of blood, but are accounted worth it—this appraisement being made by beneficiaries whose blood had not the mischance to be shed.

Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914) Discuss

 

Quotation: William Makepeace Thackeray


Are not there little chapters in everybody’s life, that seem to be nothing, and yet affect all the rest of the history?

William Makepeace Thackeray (1811-1863) Discuss

 

Today’s Birthday: ALICE MARBLE (1913)


Alice Marble (1913)

Marble was an American tennis player who began playing at age 15 and rose rapidly in the national tennis rankings after 1931. She won 18 Grand Slam championships: five in singles, six in doubles, and seven in mixed doubles. Her personal life, however, was filled with tragedy and intrigue. Her husband was killed during World War II, just days after Marble had suffered a miscarriage. She attempted suicide but recovered and, in 1945, began spying for US intelligence. What was her mission? More… Discuss

 

Quotation: Sir Walter Scott about doing good


For he that does good, having the unlimited power to do evil, deserves praise not only for the good which he performs, but for the evil which he forbears.

Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832) Discuss

 

Just a thought: “Give wars a chance….Do not resuscitate!”


Just a thought:  “Give wars a chance….Do not resuscitate!”


The Nice Guy

In pop psychology, the nice guy is an adult male who is friendly yet unassertive in relationships with women. He gives emotional support, avoids confrontation, puts others’ needs before his own, and generally treats women well. Despite these good qualities, many women, even those who claim to want a nice guy, actually choose to date men who are less considerate, likely because they are attracted to the overt sexuality of such “jerks.” Who first used the phrase “nice guys finish last”? More…

 

This Day in the Yesteryear: SHAKA ZULU IS ASSASSINATED (1828)


Shaka Zulu Is Assassinated (1828)

A skilled warrior, Shaka established himself as head of the Zulu circa 1816 and soon made them the dominant power in southeastern Africa. He was ruthless before his mother’s death in 1827, but after, he became positively savage. He had at least 7,000 people executed for being insufficiently grief-stricken, put to death any couple found to have conceived during the mourning period, and even slaughtered cows so that their calves would know the loss of a mother. Who ultimately assassinated Shaka? More… Discuss

 

Today’s Birthday: MARIE THÉRÈSE LOUISE DE SAVOIE-CARIGNAN, PRINCESSE DE LAMBALLE (1749)


Marie Thérèse Louise de Savoie-Carignan, Princesse de Lamballe (1749)

Marie Thérèse was a French aristocrat and confidant of Queen Marie Antoinette, who met with members of the National Assembly in Thérèse’s salon. As the French Revolution escalated, Thérèse attempted to stir English support for the monarchy but was soon imprisoned with the queen. After refusing to oppose the monarchy, she was delivered to a bloodthirsty mob that murdered and mutilated her in the September Massacres of 1792. After her head was cut off, it was placed on a pike and brought where? More… Discuss

 

This Day in the Yesteryear: DELANO GRAPE STRIKE BEGINS (1965)


Delano Grape Strike Begins (1965)

In late 1965, California grape workers went on strike to protest poor pay and labor conditions. Labor leader César Chávez soon took up their cause, and in 1966, he and his followers began a 340-mi (547-km) trek from Delano to the state capitol to raise awareness of the farm workers’ plight. The march began with 75 people and ended in a rally of 10,000 people on the capitol steps. Many Americans rallied to their cause and boycotted table grapes. The strike lasted five years and accomplished what? More… Discuss

 

Today’s Birthday: JESSE JAMES (1847)


Jesse James (1847)

James was an outlaw who became a legendary figure in American folklore. After the Civil War, he and a number of other former Confederate guerillas banded together to rob banks, trains, and stagecoaches across several states. He was later betrayed by fellow bandit Robert Ford, who shot him to death in 1882 in order to receive a $10,000 reward. Despite James’s reputation as a murderous thief, his exploits led to a number of romanticized legends, including rumors that he survived until when? More…Discuss

 

NO MAN’S LAND


No Man’s Land

No man’s land is territory whose ownership is unclear or under dispute and is often unoccupied. The term—then spelled “nonesmanneslond”—was likely first used in medieval Europe to describe a contested territory or refuse dumping ground between fiefdoms. During WWI, it was used to refer to the land between enemy trenches too dangerous to occupy, and during the Cold War, it became associated with territories near the Iron Curtain. What stretch of no man’s land is known as the “Cactus Curtain“? More… Discuss

 

Archimedes’ Secret (BBC Documentary)



This is the story of a book that could have changed the history of the World. To the untrained eye, it is nothing more than a small and unassuming Byzantine prayer book, yet it sold at Christies for over $2m. For faintly visible beneath the prayers on its pages are other, unique, writings – words that have been lost for nearly two thousand years.

The text is the only record of work by one of the world’s greatest minds – the ancient Greek, Archimedes – a mathematical genius centuries ahead of his time. Hidden for a millennium in a middle eastern library, it has been written over, broken up, painted on, cut up and re-glued. But in the nick of time scientists have saved the precious, fragile document, and for the first time it is revealing just how revolutionary Archimedes’ ideas were. If it had been available to scholars during the Renaissance, we might have reached the Moon over a hundred years ago.

The trail begins in the tenth century, when a scribe made a unique copy of the most important mathematics that Archimedes ever developed. For 200 years the document survived, but the mathematics in it was so complex that no one paid it any attention. So when one day a monk was looking for some new parchment – an expensive commodity at the time – to write a new prayer book, the answer seemed obvious. He used the Archimedes manuscript. He washed the Greek text off the pages, cut them in half, rebound them, and turned the Archimedes manuscript into an everyday prayer book. As he piously wrote out his prayers, he had no idea of the genius he was obliterating.

Several hundred years later, the Renaissance was under way. Scientists were beginning to grapple with new concepts, working out how mathematics could be used to explain the World around them. Little did they know that many of the problems they were just encountering Archimedes had already solved more than a thousand years before. So, tragically, they had to do that research all over again, setting back the development of science and technology immeasurably.

Then in 1906, in Constantinople, the document mysteriously turned up in a monastic library. An opportunistic scholar called Johan Ludwig Heiberg identified the text as Archimedes’ writings. Although the Greek text was very faint, Heiberg was able to decipher some of it. What he found astonished him, and made the front page of the New York Times. He revealed that Archimedes’ manuscript contained something called ‘The Method’, which showed not only Archimedes’ final proofs, but for the first time revealed the process of how he went about making his discoveries.

 

Today’s Birthday: MATTHEW ALEXANDER HENSON (1866)


Matthew Alexander Henson (1866)

Orphaned in his youth, Henson went to work on a merchant ship at the age of 12. After nearly a decade at sea, he met American explorer Robert E. Peary and became his valet and assistant for the next 22 years. In 1909, Henson accompanied Peary on the first expedition credited with reaching the North Pole. Though Peary received many honors for this achievement, Henson, an African American, was largely ignored. What did both men leave behind when they returned to mainland America from the Arctic? More… Discuss

HEDWIG ELIZABETH CHARLOTTE OF HOLSTEIN-GOTTORP


Hedwig Elizabeth Charlotte of Holstein-Gottorp

Hedwig is perhaps best remembered for her diary, which chronicled her life in the Swedish royal court. In 1774, when she was 15 years old, she married her cousin, the future King Charles XIII. The marriage was arranged by Charles’s older brother, King Gustav III, who hoped the union would ensure the continuation of his family’s power. It did not work. Habitually unfaithful, Charles died childless. Hedwig also engaged in affairs—including with the alleged lover of what other queen? More… Discuss

Spem in Alium – Thomas Tallis



Lyrics: [Latin] Spem in alium nunquam habui praeter in te
Deus Israel
qui irasceris
et propitius eris
et omnia peccata hominum in tribulatione dimittis
Domine Deus
Creator coeli et terrae
respice humilitatem nostram

[English]
I have never put my hope in any other but in You,
O God of Israel
who can show both anger
and graciousness,
and who absolves all the sins of suffering man
Lord God,
Creator of Heaven and Earth
be mindful of our lowliness

by Thomas Tallis, composed circa 1570
This piece is the culmination of Renaissance polyphony

version: David Hill, Winchester Cathedral Choir of 1995

 

FLOWERS FOR GRAVES AN ANCIENT PRACTICE


Flowers for Graves an Ancient Practice

Flowers are commonly used nowadays in burial rituals the world over, but this is nothing new. Archeologists in Israel have found evidence that humans were decorating graves with flowers as early as 11,700 BCE. Impressions of stems and blossoms, quite possibly mint and sage, were uncovered in four graves in an ancient Natufian burial ground. The Natufians were among the first peoples to transition from nomadic hunting and gathering to permanent settlements and to establish graveyardsMore… Discuss

 

Jessye Norman – Ave Maria (Schubert)


Quotation: Nathaniel Hawthorne On cemeteries, prisons, and new colonies!


The founders of a new colony, whatever Utopia of human virtue and happiness they might originally project, have invariably recognized it among their earliest practical necessities to allot a portion of the virgin soil as a cemetery, and another portion as the site of a prison.

Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864) Discuss

Today’s Birthday: LOUIS XII OF FRANCE (1462)


Louis XII of France (1462)

King of France from 1498 to 1515, Louis XII succeeded his cousin Charles VIII. Called the “Father of the People” by his subjects, Louis maintained his popularity by ruling with moderation. Despite early victories, he was unsuccessful in asserting French claims in Italy after he met resistance from Pope Julius II‘s “Holy League.” Though his failures in Italy did not tarnish his image in France, they were the subject of a commentary in a famous work by what Italian political theorist of the time? More… Discuss

 

Today’s Birthday: HENRY WARD BEECHER (1813)


Henry Ward Beecher (1813)

Beecher became one of the most famous and influential American ministers of his time for his advocacy of an emotional “gospel of love” Christianity. Every important issue of the day was discussed from his pulpit and in his lectures. He was a leader in the antislavery movement, a proponent of women’s suffrage, and an advocate of the theory of evolution. In 1874, however, he became the subject of a sensational adultery trial for an alleged affair with Elizabeth Tilton. What was the verdict? More… Discuss

Beecher became one of the most famous and influential American ministers of his time for his advocacy of an emotional “gospel of love” Christianity. Every important issue of the day was discussed from his pulpit and in his lectures. He was a leader in the antislavery movement, a proponent of women’s suffrage, and an advocate of the theory of evolution. In 1874, however, he became the subject of a sensational adultery trial for an alleged affair with Elizabeth Tilton. What was the verdict? More… Discuss

Today’s Birthday: WALLIS SIMPSON (1896)


Wallis Simpson (1896)

Simpson was an American socialite for whom English King Edward VIII voluntarily abdicated the throne. Their relationship caused a furor in England because the Church of England at the time did not allow people with living ex-spouses to marry, and, as king, Edward was also head of the church. Simpson’s two ex-husbands were still alive when she married Edward on June 3, 1937, just six months after he relinquished his title. How did Wallis and Edward spend the rest of their lives together? More… Discuss

 

OLDEST MAN IN RECORDED HISTORY PASSES AWAY


 

Jiroemon Kimura: World's oldest man ever dies at age 116

Jiroemon Kimura: World’s oldest man ever dies at age 116

Oldest Man in Recorded History Passes Away

Jiroemon Kimura, a Japanese man who, at 116, was the world’s oldest living person as well as the oldest man recorded in history, has died of natural causes. The father of seven reportedly had 14 grandchildren, 25 great-grandchildren, and 13 great-great-grandchildren. A retired postal worker, he was said to have helped out on a family farm until he was around 90. When asked the secret to his longevity, the supercentenarian said that eating light was key. One of his relatives disagreed, instead attributing his long life to his positive attitude. More…Discuss

Tim Buckley – Song to the Siren (and a great playlist….Check it out!)


Uploaded on May 12, 2010

(Monkees TV Show 1968)

Long afloat on shipless oceans
I did all my best to smile
‘Til your singing eyes and fingers
Drew me loving to your isle
And you sang
Sail to me, sail to me
Let me enfold you
Here I am, here I am
Waiting to hold you

Did I dream you dreamed about me ?
Were you hare when I was fox ?
Now my foolish boat is leaning
Broken lovelorn on your rocks
For you sing
‘Touch me not, touch me not
Come back tomorrow
Oh my heart, oh my heart
Shies from the sorrow’

I am puzzled as the oyster
I am troubled as the tide
Should I stand amid your breakers ?
Or should I lie with death my bride ?
Hear me sing
‘Swim to me, swim to me
Let me enfold you
Here I am, here I am
Waiting to hold you’

Today’s Birthday: SYLVANUS GRISWOLD MORLEY (1883)


Sylvanus Griswold Morley (1883)

Morley was an American archaeologist who studied pre-Columbian Maya civilization throughout Central America, including at Copán, Honduras, Petén, Guatemala, and Chichén Itzá, Mexico. Though his archaeological work was widely recognized during his lifetime, it was only after his death that his other career was revealed—Morley worked as a spy for the US during World War I by searching for German submarine bases in Central America. His adventurous life may have inspired what famous film character? More… Discuss

 

YVONNE, Today’s Birthday: NETTE, CÉCILE, ÉMILIE, AND MARIE: THE DIONNE QUINTUPLETS (1934)


Yvonne, Annette, Cécile, Émilie, and Marie: The Dionne Quintuplets (1934)

As the first set of quintuplets known to have survived infancy, the Dionne sisters of Ontario, Canada, garnered international attention. Sadly, they were exploited almost from birth. As infants, the quintuplets were removed from their parents’ care and made wards of the state. However, rather than protect them from parents it had deemed unfit, the government instead used the girls as a tourist attraction. How many people visited “Quintland” to see the girls over the next nine years? More… Discuss

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Quotation: Rabindranath Tagore: “We gain freedom when we have paid the full price.”


Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery - Head of Rabi...

Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery – Head of Rabindranath Tagore (Photo credit: ell brown)

 Quotation – Rabindranath Tagore:  “We gain freedom when we have paid the full price.”