Tag Archives: Igor Stravinsky

historic musical bits: Igor Stravinsky – Pastorale, pour violon solo et bois


Igor Stravinsky – Pastorale, pour violon solo et bois

today’s birthday: Dmitri Shostakovich (1906)


Dmitri Shostakovich (1906)

Although Shostakovich is regarded as the greatest Russian composer after Igor Stravinsky, he was denounced multiple times by the authorities and had his work banned during his lifetime. The first denunciation—of his opera Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk, in which he experimented with avant-garde trends—made a strong impression on him and led him to adopt a very different style that was serious and elegiac, with a directness aimed at the public. What brought him back into Stalin’s good graces? More… Discuss

STRAVINSKY – Suite Italienne: make music part of your life series



STRAVINSKY – Suite Italienne

Saint Saens – Piano conc.No.2 – Arthur Rubinstein: great compositions/performances


Saint Saens – Piano conc.No.2 – Arthur Rubinstein

make music part of you life series: Igor Stravinsky – Symphony in C major


[youtube.com/watch?v=_590K7_Dtu0]

Igor Stravinsky – Symphony in C major

Published on Jul 5, 2014

Igor Stravinsky (1882-1971):  Symphony in C major

1. Moderato alla breve
2. Larghetto concertante
3. Allegretto
4. Largo – Tempo giusto, alla breve

L’Orchestre de la Suisse Romande Charles Dutoit, conducting

great compositions/performances: Stravinsky: The Firebird / Gergiev · Vienna Philarmonic · Salzburg Festival 2000


[youtube.com/watch?v=RZkIAVGlfWk]

Stravinsky: The Firebird / Gergiev · Vienna Philarmonic · Salzburg Festival 2000

Great presentation of the Vienna Philharmonic conducted by the russian Maestro Valery Gergiev, in one of the most powerful and greatest presentation of The Firebird (L’Oiseau de feu) of Igor Stravinsky at Salzburg Festival 2000.

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(C) Deutsche Grammophon, ORF/RM Associates Limited et toutes leurs propriétaires respectifs.

The Firebird

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

Igor Stravinsky and Pablo Picasso collaborated...

Igor Stravinsky and Pablo Picasso collaborated on Pulcinella in 1920. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This article is about the ballet to Stravinsky’s 1910 music. For other uses of the word, see Firebird.

The Firebird (French: L’oiseau de feu; Russian: «Жар-птица», Zhar-ptitsa) is a ballet and orchestral concert work by the Russian composer Igor Stravinsky. It was written for the 1910 Paris season of Sergei Diaghilev‘s Ballets Russes company, with choreography by Michel Fokine. The ballet is based on Russian folk tales of the magical glowing bird that can be both a blessing and a curse to its owner. When the ballet was first performed on 25 June 1910, it was an instant success with both audience and critics.

Stravinsky was a young, virtually unknown composer when Diaghilev recruited him to create works for the Ballets Russes. The Firebird was his first project. Originally, Diaghilev approached the Russian composer Anatoly Lyadov, but later hired Stravinsky to compose the music.

The ballet has historic significance not only as Stravinsky’s breakthrough piece — “Mark him well”, said Sergei Diaghilev to Tamara Karsavina, who was dancing the title role: “He is a man on the eve of celebrity…” — but also as the beginning of the collaboration between Diaghilev and Stravinsky that would also produce Petrushka and The Rite of Spring.

Genesis and premiere

The ballet was the first of Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes productions to have an all-original score composed for it. Alexandre Benois wrote in 1910 that he had two years earlier suggested to Diaghilev the production of a Russian nationalist ballet,[7] an idea all the more attractive given both the newly awakened French passion for Russian dance and also the ruinously expensive costs of staging opera. The inspiration of mixing the mythical Firebird with the unrelated Russian tale of Kaschei the deathless possibly came from a popular child’s verse by Yakov Polonsky, “A Winter’s Journey” (Zimniy put, 1844), which includes the lines:

And in my dreams I see myself on a wolf’s back
Riding along a forest path
To do battle with a sorcerer-tsar [i.e., Kaschei]]
In that land where a princess sits under lock and key,
Pining behind massive walls.
There gardens surround a palace all of glass;
There Firebirds sing by night
And peck at golden fruit.[8]

today’s birthday: Jean Cocteau (1889)


Jean Cocteau (1889)

Cocteau was a French author and filmmaker who worked in many artistic mediums. In the years when he was addicted to opium, he produced some of his most important works, including the novel Les Enfants Terribles. In addition to the play La Machine Infernale and the film Beauty and the Beast, Cocteau wrote ballet scenarios and librettos for Erik Satie and Igor Stravinsky, and he illustrated numerous books with his vivid drawings. What was his connection to Pablo Picasso? More… Discuss

great compositions/performances: Stravinsky: The Firebird / Gergiev · Vienna Philarmonic · Salzburg Festival 2000


[youtube.com/watch?v=RZkIAVGlfWk]

Stravinsky: The Firebird / Gergiev · Vienna Philarmonic · Salzburg Festival 2000

Great presentation of the Vienna Philharmonic conducted by the russian Maestro Valery Gergiev, in one of the most powerful and greatest presentation of The Firebird (L’Oiseau de feu) of Igor Stravinsky at Salzburg Festival 2000.

today’s birthday: Igor Stravinsky (1882)


Igor Stravinsky (1882)

Stravinsky was a Russian-American composer considered by many to be the greatest and most versatile composer of the 20th century. His first major success, The Firebird, brought him international renown in 1910. He followed this the next year with the great ballet score Petrushka and two years after that with his most acclaimed—and controversial—work, the ballet The Rite of Spring, recognized as a landmark and masterpiece of modern music. Why did its premiere provoke a riot? More… Discuss

MAKE MUSIC PART OF YOUR LIFE SERIES: Igor Stravinsky – Pétrouchka (1911)/ Mitropoulos


[youtube.com/watch?v=IW84HhzoodE]

Igor Stravinsky: Pétrouchka (1911)/ Mitropoulos

Igor Stravinsky (1882-1971): Pétrouchka, balletto in quattro quadri (versione originale 1911) — New York Philharmonic diretta da Dimitri Mitropoulos

I. Fête populaire de la semaine grasse – Le tour de passe-passe – Danse russe
II. Chez Pétrouchka
III. Chez le maure – Danse de la ballerine – Valse. La ballerine et le maure
IV. Fête populaire de la semaine grasse (vers le soir) – Danse des nousnous – Danse des cochers et des palefreniers – Les déguisés

— cover image by Mikhail Fokine

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Grieg – Piano Concerto & Chopin: Piano Concerto – Arthur Rubinstein


Published on Mar 15, 2013

Magnificent two piano concerto`s Piano: Arthur Rubinstein, conducted: Andre Previn London Symphony Orchestra recorded 1975. Arthur Rubinstein was born in Łódź (January 28, 1887 — December 20, 1982), Congress Poland (part of the Russian Empire for the entire time Rubinstein resided there) on January 28, 1887, to a Jewish family. He was the youngest of seven children, and his father owned a small textile factory. Arthur Rubinstein. However, his United States impresario Sol Hurok insisted he be billed as Artur, and records were released in the West under both versions of his name. At the age of two, Rubinstein demonstrated perfect pitch and a fascination with the piano, watching his elder sister’s piano lessons. By the age of four, he was recognised as a child prodigy. His father had a predilection for the violin and offered Rubinstein a violin; but Rubinstein rejected it because he thought his instinct was for harmony and polyphony. The Hungarian violinist Joseph Joachim, on hearing the four-year-old child play, was greatly impressed, told Arthur’s family, 1894, seven-year-old Arthur Rubinstein had his debut with pieces by Mozart, Schubert and Mendelssohn. At the age of ten, Rubinstein moved to Berlin to continue his studies, and gave his first performance with the Berlin Philharmonic in 1900, at the age of 13. Rubinstein made his New York debut at Carnegie Hall in 1906, and thereafter toured the United States, Austria, Italy, and Russia. In 1912, he made his London debut, and found a home there in the Edith Grove, Chelsea, musical salon of Paul and Muriel Draper, in company with Kochanski, Igor Stravinsky, Jacques Thibaud, Pablo Casals, Pierre Monteux and others. During World War I, Rubinstein stayed in London, giving recitals and accompanying the violinist Eugène Ysaÿe. In 1916 and 1917, he made his first tours in Spain and South America where he was wildly acclaimed. It was during those tours that he developed a lifelong enthusiasm for the music of Enrique Granados, Isaac Albéniz, Manuel de Falla, and Heitor Villa-Lobos. He was the dedicatee of Villa-Lobos’s Rudepoêma and Stravinsky’s Trois mouvements de Petrouchka. Rubinstein was disgusted by Germany’s conduct during the war, and never played there again. His last performance in Germany was in 1914. In 1921 Rubinstein gave two American tours, travelling to New York with Karol Szymanowski and his close friend Paul Kochanski. In 1932, the pianist, who stated he neglected his technique in his early years, relying instead on natural talent, withdrew from concert life for several months of intensive study and practice. Rubinstein toured the United States again in 1937, his career becoming centered there during the World War II years when he lived in Brentwood, California. He became a naturalized American citizen in 1946. A cast of the pianist’s hands, at the Łódź museum During his time in California, Rubinstein provided the piano soundtrack for several films, including Song of Love with Katherine Hepburn. He appeared, as himself, in films Carnegie Hall and Of Men and Music. Although best known as a recitalist and concerto soloist, Rubinstein was also considered an outstanding chamber musician, partnering with such luminaries as Henryk Szeryng, Jascha Heifetz, Pablo Casals, Gregor Piatigorsky, and the Guarneri Quartet. Rubinstein recorded much of the core piano repertoire, particularly that of the Romantic composers. At the time of his death, the New York Times in describing him wrote, “Chopin was his specialty . . . it was [as] a Chopinist that he was considered by many without peer”. With the exception of the Études, he recorded most of the works of Chopin. He was one of the earliest champions of the Spanish and South American composers and of French composers who, in the early twentieth century, were still considered “modern” such as Debussy and Ravel. In addition, Rubinstein was the first champion of the music of his compatriot Karol Szymanowski. Rubinstein, in conversation with Alexander Scriabin, named Brahms as his favorite composer, a response that enraged Scriabin. In 1975, a documentary named Artur Rubinstein, Love of Life was on; a TV special named Rubinstein at 90 represented he had been playing for people for eight decades. By the mid-1970s, Rubinstein’s eyesight had begun to deteriorate. He retired from the stage at age eighty-nine in May 1976, giving his last concert at London’s Wigmore Hall, where he had first played nearly seventy years before. Rubinstein, who was fluent in eight languages, held much of the repertoire, not simply that of the piano, in his formidable memory.

 

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Astor Piazzolla – Libertango


Aram Gharabekian conducts the National Chamber Orchestra of Armenia – the orchestral version of the Astor Piazzolla Libertango at the Zvartnots Monument-Complex Gala Concert in 2006 in Armenia.

 

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Great Composers/Compositions: Frédéric Chopin – Grande valse brilliante


Frédéric Chopin (1810-1849)

Les Sylphides“, op. 18; Finale: Grande valse brillinate

Cincinnati Pops Orchestra
Erich Kunzel

 

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Fabulous Performances: George Szell conducts Ravel’s Daphnis and Chloe: Suite No. 2



George Szell conducts the Cleveland Orchestra

 

Igor Stravinsky, Four Norvegian Moods



Igor Stravinsky (1882-1971): Four Norvegian Moods (1942) – The Cleveland Orchestra diretta da Riccardo Chailly

This Day in History: Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring Sparks a Riot (1913)


Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring Sparks a Riot (1913)

The Rite of Spring is a landmark ballet by Russian composer Igor Stravinsky that provoked a riot when it premiered at the Théâtre des Champs-Elysées in Paris. Expecting the demure conventions of classical ballet, the audience was caught off-guard by Stravinsky’s dissonant score and Vaslav Nijinsky‘s violently untraditional choreography depicting fertility rites. Fistfights broke out between detractors and supporters, and chaos ensued. What Disney film popularized the ballet? More… Discuss

ballet shoes line

 

Dmitri Shostakovich Festive Uverture Op 96


Shostakovich Festive Overture Op 96 Live At The  Nobel Prize Concert 2009:

Composer: Dmitri Shostakovich,

Conductor: Yuri Temirkanov,
Orchestra: Royal Stockholm Philharmonic.

Dmitri Dmitriyevich Shostakovich (September 1906 — 9 August 1975) was a Soviet Russian composer and one of the most celebrated composers of the 20th century.

Shostakovich achieved fame in the Soviet Union under the patronage of Leon Trotsky‘s chief of staff Mikhail Tukhachevsky, but later had a complex and difficult relationship with the Stalinist bureaucracy. In 1936, the government, most probably under orders from Stalin, harshly criticized his opera Lady Macbeth of the Mtsensk District, causing him to withdraw the Fourth Symphony during its rehearsal stages. Shostakovich’s music was officially denounced twice, in 1936 and 1948, and was periodically banned. Nevertheless, he also received accolades and state awards and served in the Supreme Soviet of the RSFSR. Despite the official controversy, his works were popular and well received.

After a period influenced by Sergei Prokofiev and Igor Stravinsky, Shostakovich developed a hybrid style, as exemplified by Lady Macbeth of the Mtsensk District (1934). This single work juxtaposed a wide variety of trends, including the neo-classical style (showing the influence of Stravinsky) and post-Romanticism (after Gustav Mahler). Sharp contrasts and elements of the grotesque characterize much of his music.

Shostakovich’s orchestral works include 15 symphonies and six concerti. His symphonic work is typically complex and requires large scale orchestras. Music for chamber ensembles includes 15 string quartets, a piano quintet, two pieces for a string octet, and two piano trios. For the piano he composed two solo sonatas, an early set of preludes, and a later set of 24 preludes and fugues. Other works include two operas, and a substantial quantity of film music. Read more about His life and work at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dmitri_Shostakovich