Tag Archives: India

today’s Holiday: Indian Arrival Day


Indian Arrival Day

The people of Trinidad and Tobago observe May 30 as Indian Arrival Day. This holiday honors the nation’s citizens of Indian descent and acknowledges their contribution to the social and cultural landscape of Trinidad and Tobago. In particular, it recalls the arrival of the first boats from India in 1845. The holiday is celebrated with reenactments of the arrival of the first ships bringing Indians to Trinidad, parades honoring the history of the nation’s Indian citizens and their festivals, and various cultural events. More… Discuss

 

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The Ajanta Caves


The Ajanta Caves

These caves in Maharashtra, India, discovered in 1819, are carved out of the side of a steep horseshoe-shaped ravine and contain remarkable examples of Buddhist art. They consist of chapels and monasteries dating from about 200 BCE to 650 CE, with magnificent frescoes and sculpture depicting scenes from the life of Buddha. Changes in Buddhist thought in what century made it possible for the image of the Buddha to become a focus of worship? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: First Ascent of Shishapangma (1964)


First Ascent of Shishapangma (1964)

Located in south-central Tibet near the border of Nepal, Shishapangma is the fourteenth highest mountain in the world and the lowest of the eight-thousanders—peaks in the Himalayan and Karakoram mountain ranges that exceed a height of 8,000 m (26,247 ft). Scaled in 1964, it was the last eight-thousander to be climbed because China imposed severe travel restrictions on foreigners at the time. It is considered one of the easiest eight-thousanders to summit; nevertheless, how many have died trying? More… Discuss

Rickshaws


Rickshaws

A rickshaw is a small, two-wheeled carriage that is usually drawn by one person. The first rickshaws appeared in Japan around 1868 and became a popular mode of transportation because human labor was considerably cheaper than that of horses. Rickshaws were mainly used in Asia, but nowadays they are outlawed in many places and have been replaced by cycle and auto rickshaws. What is the origin of the carriage’s name? More… Discuss

English: An auto rickshaw in Bangalore, India

English: An auto rickshaw in Bangalore, India (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Most Facebook content censored 1 India 2 Turkey 3 Pakistan 4 Germany 5 Russia — Conrad Hackett


this day in the yesteryear: Singapore Established as a Trading Post (1819)


Singapore Established as a Trading Post (1819)

A trading center as early as the 14th century, Singapore was later part of Johor, a region of the southern Malay Peninsula. In 1819, the island of Singapore was ceded to the British East India Company, and the city was founded the same year by Sir Thomas Raffles. Under Raffles’ direction, Singapore developed a vital role in the lucrative China trade. Today, the city is one of the world’s biggest ports. The earliest known settlement on the island of Singapore was referred to by what name? More… Discuss

todays’ holiday: Sri Lanka National Day (2015)


Sri Lanka National Day (2015)

The former British colony of Ceylon changed its name in 1972 to Sri Lanka, which means “Blessed Isle.” Sri Lankans commemorate the granting of their independence from Great Britain on February 4, 1948, with public gatherings throughout the island and special services in the temples, churches, and mosques. There are also parades, folk dances, processions, and national games. More… Discuss

people-places-civilizations: Gurkha


Gurkha

The Gurkha are members of a Nepali ethnic group who claim descent from the Rajputs and Brahmins of North India. They entered Nepal from the west after being driven from India and, in the early 16th century, conquered the small state of Gurkha. They then expanded eastward and established their authority over all of Nepal by the mid-18th century, although a subsequent war with the British in India brought a strong British influence to Nepal. What is the name of their famed curved knife? More… Discuss

from BBC: The Kalka-Shimla Railway: A must see video: Come watch it at EUZICASA!


from BBC: The Darjeeling Himalayan Railway: Put India on top of your “MUST VISIT” list (Bucket list may be?) This video is really a treat!


Saint of the Day for Friday, December 19th, 2014: St. Nemesius


Malala receives joint Nobel award


Malala receives joint Nobel award http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-30411049
[embbed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kmqF9Y2Yq1U[/embed]

Raw Video: Malala Yousafzai’s entire Nobel prize speech

this day in the yesteryear: India: Scars of Bhopal disaster hard to heal–France 24 Internationale


via  India: Scars of Bhopal disaster hard to heal
–France 24 Internationale

**********************************************************************

Just a thought: “This day in yesteryear: The worst environmental disaster llives up to its predicament! Soil, water, air, and habitat are still suffering the fallout of this human civilization tragedy! Ask yourselves: Do I wish this to happen again?”
– George-B

quotation: We are not concerned with the very poor. They are unthinkable, and only to be approached by the statistician or the poet. E. M. Forster


We are not concerned with the very poor. They are unthinkable, and only to be approached by the statistician or the poet.

E. M. Forster (1879-1970) Discuss

36 Million Slaves Worldwide


36 Million Slaves Worldwide

Slavery may seem like a relic of the past, but in fact 0.5 percent of the world’s population—36 million people—are currently enslaved. The survey, by anti-slavery group Walk Free, identifies as slaves those subjected to forced labor, debt bondage, trafficking, sexual exploitation for money, and forced or servile marriage. India hosts the greatest number of slaves of any country, with 14 million, followed by China, Pakistan, Uzbekistan, and then Russia. Mauritania, meanwhile, has the ignominious distinction of having the highest percentage of slaves, at 4 percent of its population. More… Discuss

Fireworks


Fireworks

Fireworks, which are generally believed to have been invented by the Chinese, have been used throughout history to celebrate happy occasions. In 1789, George Washington’s inauguration was accompanied by a display, and today, fireworks help mark Independence Day in the US, Diwali in India, Bastille Day in France, and New Year’s Eve around the world. In 1999, Disney World began launching fireworks with compressed air rather than gunpowder. What are the advantages of this type of launch? More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Indira Gandhi (1917)


 

Indira Gandhi (1917)

India’s first and only female prime minister, Indira Gandhi held the position from 1966 to 1977 and from 1980 to 1984. During her tenure, India fought a successful war against Pakistan and became the dominant power on the subcontinent. However, she became embroiled in political controversy and a fierce ethnic conflict, which led to her assassination in 1984. Her son, Rajiv, succeeded her as prime minister but was himself assassinated by Tamil separatists. Who was Indira’s famous father? More… Discuss

 

today;s birthday: Soichiro Honda (1906)


Soichiro Honda (1906)

The Honda name is known worldwide thanks to Soichiro Honda. In 1946, in the aftermath of World War II, the self-taught Japanese engineer founded the Honda Technical Research Institute—now the Honda Motor Company—and began manufacturing motorcycles. Bolstered by success, he soon began producing cars. His company’s clean-burning CVCC engine spurred an automotive revolution, and his cars won a large share of the US market. What mischievous business scheme got Honda in trouble as a schoolboy? More… Discuss

The Taj Mahal


The Taj Mahal

The Taj Mahal in Agra, India, is considered one of the most beautiful buildings in the world and the finest example of the late style of Indian Islamic architecture. Mughal emperor Shah Jahan ordered it built as a mausoleum for his favorite wife, Mumtaz Mahal. The building’s white marble exterior is inlaid with semiprecious stones arranged in Arabic inscriptions, floral designs, and arabesques, and its gardens reflect the Islamic Paradise. When was the monument’s construction begun? More… Discuss

Gymnema sylvestre: used for thousands of years as tea for various ailments of the digestive system and Type 2 daibetes


Gymnema sylvestre

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
Gymnema sylvestre
Gymnema sylvestre.jpg
in Karyavattam University Campus of Kerala, India.
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Asterids
Order: Gentianales
Family: Asclepiadaceae
Genus: Gymnema
Species: G. sylvestre
Binomial name
Gymnema sylvestre
R. Br.

Gymnema sylvestre (Sinhala: මස්බැද්ද / Masbadda)(Malayalam:ചക്കരക്കൊല്ലി ,Tamil:சிறுகுறிஞ்சா) is an herb native to the tropical forests of southern and central India and Sri Lanka. Chewing the leaves suppresses the sensation of sweet. This effect is attributed to the eponymous gymnemic acids. G. sylvestre has been used in herbal medicine as a treatment for diabetes for nearly two millennia,[1] and though there is insufficient scientific evidence to draw definitive conclusions about its efficacy[2] two small clinical trials have shown gymnema to reduce glycosylated hemoglobin levels.[3] Common names include gymnema,[4] cowplant, Australian cowplant, gurmari, gurmarbooti, gurmar, periploca of the woods, meshasringa (मेषशृंग), Bedki cha pala (बेडकीचा पाला) and miracle fruit[5][6](also a common name for two unrelated plants).

Chemical composition

The major bioactive constituents of G. sylvestre are a group of oleanane-type triterpenoid saponins known as gymnemic acids. The latter contain several acylated (tigloyl, methylbutyroyl etc.,) derivatives of deacylgymnemic acid (DAGA) which is the 3-O-glucuronide of gymnemagenin (3,16,21,22,23,28-hexahydroxy-olean-12-ene). The individual gymnemic acids (saponins) include gymnemic acids I-VII, gymnemosides A-F, and gymnemasaponins.[citation needed]

G. sylvestre leaves contain triterpene saponins belonging to oleanane and dammarene classes. Oleanane saponins are gymnemic acids and gymnemasaponins, while dammarene saponins are gymnemasides. Besides this, other plant constituents are flavones, anthraquinones, hentriacontane, pentatriacontane, α and β-chlorophylls, phytin, resins, d-quercitol, tartaric acid, formic acid, butyric acid, lupeol, β-amyrin-related glycosides and stigmasterol. The plant extract also tests positive for alkaloids. Leaves of this species yield acidic glycosides and anthroquinones and their derivatives.[citation needed]

Use as herbal medicine

The effects of the herb are not entirely known. Gymnema reduces the taste of sugar when it is placed in the mouth. From extract of the leaves were isolated glycosides known as gymnemic acids, which exhibit anti-sweet activity.[7] This effect lasts up to about 2 hours. Some postulate that the herb may block sugar receptors on the tongue. This effect was observed in isolated rat neurons.[8]

The active ingredients are thought to be the family of compounds related to gymnemic acid: purified gymnemic acids are widely used as experimental reagents in taste physiology[9] and have also an anti-diabetic effect in animal models,[10] reduce intestinal transport of maltose in rats when combined with acarbose,[11] and reduce absorption of free oleic acid in rats.[12]

Historically, the leaves were used for stomach ailments, constipation, water retention, and liver disease;[citation needed] however, these claims are not supported by scientific studies.[13]

A water-soluble extract of G. sylvestre caused reversible increases in intracellular calcium and insulin secretion in mouse and human β-cells when used at a concentration (0.125 mg/ml) without compromising cell viability. This in vitro data suggests that extracts derived from G. sylvestre may be useful as therapeutic agents for the stimulation of insulin secretion in individuals with type 2 diabetes.[14] The rise in insulin levels may be due to regeneration of the cells in the pancreas.[15] G. sylvestre can also help prevent adrenal hormones from stimulating the liver to produce glucose in mice, thereby reducing blood sugar levels.[16] Clinical trials with type 2 diabetics in India have used 400 mg per day of water-soluble acidic fraction of the Gymnema leaves administered for 18–20 months as a supplement to the conventional oral drugs. During GS4 supplementation, the patients showed a significant reduction in blood glucose, glycosylated haemoglobin and glycosylated plasma proteins, and conventional drug dosage could be decreased. Five of the 22 diabetic patients were able to discontinue their conventional drug and maintain their blood glucose homeostasis with GS4 alone. These data suggest that the beta cells may be regenerated/repaired in Type 2 diabetic patients on GS4 supplementation. This is supported by the appearance of raised insulin levels in the serum of patients after GS4 supplementation.[17] Though for the moment G. sylvestre cannot be used in place of insulin to control blood sugar by people with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes, further evidence of its positive effect is accumulating[18][unreliable source?]

Alternative names

Despite the part used being the leaf, one common name of this species is miracle fruit,[4][5][6] a name shared by two other species: Synsepalum dulcificum and Thaumatococcus daniellii.[5] Both species are used to alter the perceived sweetness of foods.

In English the species is also known as gymnema, cowplant, and Australian cowplant.[citation needed]

This species also goes under many other names such as; Gurmari, Gurmarbooti, Gurmar, periploca of the woods and Meshasringa. The Hindi word Gur-mar (Madhunaashini in Sanskrit, Chakkarakolli in Malayalam,Podapatri in Telugu), literally means sugar destroyer. Meshasringa (Sanskrit) translates as “ram’s horn”, a name given to the plant from the shape of its fruits. Gymnema derives from the Greek words “gymnos” (γυμνὀς) and “nēma” (νῆμα) meaning “naked” and “thread” respectively; the species epitheton sylvestre means “of the forest” in Latin.[19]

 

Gujarat govt issues Rs 2,979-cr work order to L&T for Statue of Unity— Business Standard (@bsindia) October 27, 2014


quotation: “…coarseness, revealing something; vulgarity, concealing something…”: E. M. Forster


Very notable was his distinction between coarseness and vulgarity, coarseness, revealing something; vulgarity, concealing something.

E. M. Forster (1879-1970) Discuss

this pressed for your right to know: Where Do the World’s Wealthiest People Live? – Real Time Economics – WSJ


Of course, the U.S. has a lot of wealthy people because it’s a big country. But the analysis suggests that the U.S. is punching above its weight, even after accounting for population. Total wealth per adult increased by $340,340 in North America, or an increase of 10.2% from the prior year. Total wealth per adult grew by nearly $146,000 in Europe, an increase of 10.4%.

By contrast, wealth per adult grew just 2.3% in China and it fell 1.9% in Latin America and 3.1% in India.

via Where Do the World’s Wealthiest People Live? – Real Time Economics – WSJ.

today’s holiday: Gandhi Jayanti – national holiday in India


Gandhi Jayanti

October 2 is a national holiday in India to commemorate the birth of Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi, who came to be known as Mahatma (“great soul“) Gandhi. At this time, pilgrimages are made from throughout the country to the Raj Ghat on the banks of the Yamuna River in Delhi, where Gandhi was cremated. Many communities also hold spinning and weaving sessions in honor of Gandhi, who is often pictured in a simple white cotton robe at a spinning wheel. More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Mohandas Gandhi (1869)


Mohandas Gandhi (1869)

Gandhi is remembered as one of the greatest leaders of the 20th century for his role in securing India’s independence from British rule through non-violent civil disobedience, a method that has since inspired notable civil rights leaders around the globe. The victory was bittersweet for Gandhi, who had championed HinduMuslim unity, as independence came with a plan to carve out a separate Muslim state—Pakistan. In 1948, he was assassinated by a Hindu fanatic. Why is Gandhi often called Mahatma? More… Discuss

word: thwart


thwart  (thwôrt)

tr.v. thwart·ed, thwart·ing, thwarts

1. To prevent the occurrence, realization, or attainment of: They thwarted her plans.
2. To oppose and defeat the efforts, plans, or ambitions of.
n. Nautical

A seat across a boat on which a rower may sit.
adj.

1. Extending, lying, or passing across; transverse.
2. Eager to oppose, especially wrongly; perverse.
adv. & prep. Archaic

Athwart; across.

[Middle English thwerten, from thwert, across, from Old Norse thvert, neuter of thverr, transverse; see terkw- in Indo-European roots.]

Filigree


Filigree

Filigree is an ornamental work of fine gold or silver wire, often wrought into an openwork design and joined with matching solder under the flame of a blowpipe. It was made in ancient Egypt, China, and India. Saxons, Britons, and especially the Celts in Ireland were skilled at devising intricate and ingenious designs in the Middle Ages. Today, it is employed in Mediterranean areas, as well as in Mexico, India, and Scandinavian countries. What is the origin of the word “filigree“? More… Discuss

The Hope Diamond


The Hope Diamond

The Hope Diamond is a large, blue diamond, currently housed in the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History in Washington, DC. Its history can be traced to the “Tavernier Blue,” a crudely cut diamond of about 112 carats originally mined in India, which King Louis XIV of France later purchased and cut into “the Blue Diamond of the Crown,” or “the French Blue.” Legend has it that the Hope Diamond is cursed and causes misfortune to befall its possessors. How did it acquire this reputation? More… Discuss

thoday’s holiday: Maidens’ Fair on Mount Gaina


Maidens’ Fair on Mount Gaina

The Maidens’ Fair is a major folk festival held at Mount Gaina in Transylvania, Romania. It was originally a marriage fair, where young men came to choose their future wives, but is now an opportunity for people to display their talents in handicrafts, costume making, singing, and dancing. Thousands of people gather for the events of the fair, which include dance competitions and concerts by folk bands and singers. Other aspects of the festival are feasts and bonfires, and the chanting of satirical verses during certain folk dances. More…
[youtube.com/watch?v=_kO_NPMPhH8]

TARGUL DE FETE DE PE MUNTELE GAINA

Published on Dec 5, 2012

PRODUCTIE MEDIA NELSTILL-filme de prezentare obiective turistice, hoteluri, pensiuni
Contact: office@nelstill.com http://www.nelstill.com
http://videohive.net/user/nels/portfo…

Mehndi


Mehndi

Mehndi is a form of temporary skin decoration popular in the Middle East, North Africa, and South Asia. Henna paste—made from the leaves of a shrub native to these regions—is applied to the skin, typically on the palms of the hands and soles of the feet. The decorated area is then wrapped to lock in body heat and create a more intense color, usually a reddish brown. Traditionally, mehndi adorns the skin of brides, and occasionally grooms, at their weddings. How long does the color last? More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Birthday of the Dalai Lama


 

English: Inside Potala Palace, Dalai Lama form...

English: Inside Potala Palace, Dalai Lama former residence. Italiano: Interno del palazzo del Potala, residenza del Dalai Lama fino all’esilio in India. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

Birthday of the Dalai Lama

 

This celebration is held on July 6 for the birthday of the current Dalai Lama, the spiritual and political head of Tibet. The present Dalai Lama, Tenzin Gyatso (b. 1935), is the latest in the line that began in the 14th century. Each Dalai Lama is believed to be the reincarnation of the preceding one, and when a Dalai Lama dies, Tibetan lamas search throughout the country for a child who is his reincarnation. The birthday is observed today by exiles in India with family picnics, traditional dances and singing, and incense-burning ceremonies to appease the local spirits. More… Discuss

 

 

 

 

quotation: Funny how the new things are the old things. Rudyard Kipling


Funny how the new things are the old things.

Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936) Discuss

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just a thought: “There is no difference between people, not that we’re born with, not of any significance.” (©always)


just a thought:  “There is no difference between people. Not in our make at least. The differences are pondered upon us by the culture and tradition of the people we’re born to. Our natural senses about the world around us are shaped into the likeness of those around us from early age, before we can determine by ourselves the values that are imposed upon us.

There is no difference between people, not that we’re born with, not of any significance.” (©always)

George B.

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word: felicitate


felicitate 

Definition: (verb) To offer congratulations to.
Synonyms: congratulate
Usage: I felicitate you on your memory, sir. Discuss.
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this day in the yesteryear: Jawaharlal Nehru Dies in Office (1964)


Jawaharlal Nehru Dies in Office (1964)

Nehru was an Indian statesman and leader with Mohandas Gandhi in the struggle for Indian home rule. Nehru served as president of the Indian National Congress, and, in 1947, became India’s first prime minister, leading the country through the difficult early years of independence. Domestically, he promoted democracy, socialism, secularism, and unity, adapting modern values to Indian conditions. His daughter, Indira Gandhi, later served as prime minister. What is believed to have killed Nehru? More… Discuss

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EUZICASA: 200 DIFFERENT COUNTRIES HAVE VISITED THIS SITE! THANKS TO EVERYONE OF MY VISITORS!


EUZICASA - 200 DIFFERENT COUNTRIE HAVE VISITED THIS SITE

EUZICASA: 200 DIFFERENT COUNTRIES HAVE VISITED THIS SITE! MANY THANKS TO EVERYONE OF MY VISITORS!

 

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today’s Holiday: Birthday of Tagore


Birthday of Tagore

This date commemorates the birth of Rabindranath Tagore (1861-1941), the great poet, philosopher, social reformer, dramatist, and musician of Calcutta, India. In 1913, he was the first non-European to win the Nobel Prize for literature. Tagore’s birthday is celebrated with a festival of his poetry, plays, music, and dance dramas. There are discussions at schools and universities of his ideas on education and philosophy, and screenings of films based on Tagore’s short stories and novels made by filmmaker and Calcutta native, Satyajit Ray. More… Discuss

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The Tenets of Sikhism


The Tenets of Sikhism

Sikhism is a monotheistic religion founded in northern India when the guru Nanak broke from orthodox Hinduism in the 16th century. Thus, though the religions have commonalities—for example, both believe in a cycle of reincarnation that is impacted by one’s actions—Sikhism rejects certain Hindu beliefs, like caste distinctions and asceticism. Nanak’s doctrine also stipulates that meditation must be inward and devoid of external aids. What are the “Five Thieves” that Sikhs are obliged to conquer? More… Discuss

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ARTICLE: YOGA


Yoga

Yoga dates to at least the 2nd century BCE—and likely much earlier—as an orthodox school of Hindu philosophy, but it has become known outside of India as a means of physical and mental exercise. The popular form in the West is hatha yoga, which emphasizes specific postures combined with controlled breathing to bring about mental calm. Hatha yoga’s more than 1,000 positions are intended to make the spine supple and promote circulation throughout the body. What does yoga mean in SanskritMore… Discuss

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NEWS: AND THEN THERE WERE THREE


And Then There Were Three

It’s official: India is polio-free. Having gone three years without a single new case, India has been certified by the World Health Organization as free of the crippling disease. An incredible achievement in public health, theeradication of polio around much of the globe, and now India, shows just what can be accomplished when governments, healthcare agencies, and people work together toward a common goal. In 1988, when the Global Polio Eradication Initiative was first launched, more than 350,000 people in 125 countries were contracting polio annually. Last year, there were just 406 reported cases, and only three countries now remain polio-endemic. More… Discuss

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ARTIFICER


artificer 

Definition: (noun) A skilled worker who practices some trade or handicraft.
Synonyms: artisanjourneymancraftsman
Usage: There are native tanners, shoemakers, weavers, blacksmiths, stonecutters, and other artificers attached to each establishment. Discuss.
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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: BANGLADESH INDEPENDENCE DAY


Bangladesh Independence Day

This public holiday celebrates the declaration of independence of the state of Bangladesh on March 26, 1971. When India gained independence from Britain in 1947, the region that is now Bangladesh became East Pakistan, and was governed together with West Pakistan as one country. By early 1971, differences between East and West Pakistan had led to war. When India entered the war in November, independence was assured. Bangladeshis observe this national holiday in the capital city of Dhaka with memorial ceremonies, a boat race on the Buriganga river, and other festivities. More… Discuss

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ARTICLE: BOLLYWOOD


Like Hollywood in the US, Bollywood is the movie industry in India. It began in Bombay—now Mumbai—in the 1930s and developed into a film empire that puts out as many as 1,000 feature films annually. Bollywood movies typically include formulaic story lines, expertly choreographed fight scenes, spectacular song-and-dance routines, emotion-charged melodrama, and larger-than-life heroes. More artistic fare can be found in India’s alternative films, called Parallel Cinema. What is TollywoodMore…Discuss

 

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ARTICLE: THE LINGAM


The Lingam

The lingam is a Hindu symbol of the god Shiva and of generative power. Fashioned from wood, gems, metal, or stone, lingams are common in family shrines throughout India. Historically, the lingam was a representation of the phallus, and a sexual dimension is apparent today as the yoni—symbol of the female sex organ—often forms the base of the lingam to emphasize the male and female aspects of existence. What did British missionary William Ward say about lingams in his 1815 book? More…

 

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ARTICLE: THE SWASTIKA


The Swastika

Though in the minds of many Westerners the swastika is inextricably linked with Nazis and genocide, it has long been a symbol of prosperity and good fortune. In India, it remains the most common auspicious symbol of Hindus and Jains, as well as Buddhists, for whom it symbolizes the Buddha‘s feet. In China and Japan, where it traveled with the spread of Buddhism, it has been used to denote plurality, prosperity, and long life. Why did the Nazi Party adopt the ancient symbol as its emblem? More… Discuss

 

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TODAY’S HOLIDAY: SHAHEED DAY


Shaheed Day

Before becoming an autonomous country in 1971, Bangladesh had been East Pakistan ever since India gained independence from Britain in 1947. West Pakistan wanted to make its language, Urdu, the only official language of both Pakistans. Most of the people in East Pakistan spoke Bengali, and they opposed the restriction of the use of their language in government and commerce. In 1952, university students held protests that erupted in violence. Lives were lost, and, as a memorial, people form a procession from the Azimpur graveyard on February 21 each year. More…Discuss

 

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ARTICLE: TECHNOPHOBIA


Technophobia

Technophobia—a fear of advanced technology—emerged alongside the mechanical innovations of the Industrial Revolution and became ever more pervasive as inventions ranging from the light bulb to the atomic bomb demonstrated technology’s astounding capabilities. Mild technophobia is quite common—many experience it when facing an unfamiliar computer system at a new job. More acute technophobes see technology as inherently dangerous. What well-known novel was one of the first to tackle technophobia? More… Discuss

 

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Great Arias/Performances: The luscious and exoteric ‘Flower Duet’ (Viens, Mallika) from Léo Delibes’ Lakme – sung ravishingly by Joan Sutherland and Huguette Tourangeau (+Check the Aria Database search WIDGET….THAT’S RIGHT WIDGET!)


WIDGET: The Aria Database (you are one click away)

WIDGET: The Aria Database (you are one click away)

from Act III of the French opera Lakmé by Leo Delibes
Libretto: Edmond Gondinet
 
Role: Lakmé, daughter of Nilakantha, a divine priestess
Voice Part: soprano       Fachlyric coloratura
Setting: A garden surrounding a secret temple in India
Synopsis: Without Gerald knowing, Lakmé bites into a poisonous datura leaf because Gerald is leaving her. Before she shows any signs of the poison, though, she tells him that she has learned much from him and offers the sacred cup to him to join them together eternally.
Translations/Aria Texts:

Libretto entered by Bob Frone (added 1998-08-13)

Tu m’as donné le plus doux rêve, Lakme’s aria from Lakme

Tu m’as donné le plus doux rêve
Qu’on puisse avoir sous notre ciel,
Reste encore, pour qu’il s’achève,
Ici, loin de monde réel.

Tu m’as dit des mots de tendresse,
Que les Indous ne savent pas,
C’est toi qui m’as appris l’ivresse
Des aveux murmurés tout bas, murmurés tout bas.

Ah! Tu m’as donné le plus doux rêve
Qu’on puisse avoir sous notre ciel
Reste encore pour qu’il s’achève,
Ici, loin du monde réel!

[youtube.com/watch?v=1xuzkPjhNAo]
The luscious Flower Duet (Viens, Mallika) from Léo Delibes‘ Lakme – sung ravishingly by Joan Sutherland and Huguette Tourangeau. The piece has been used in many movies and TV programs to great effect – lush, lyrical and exotic. Of Dame Joan’s performance one reviewer wrote: “The superlatives are extended when describing Sutherland’s performance; a great talent at its height, enthralling by the sheer beauty of that stupendous voice.” – The Sydney Sun

Join in the Dame Joan discussion here: http://goo.gl/kA9Be

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TODAY’S HOLIDAY: SRI LANKA NATIONAL DAY


Sri Lanka National Day

The former British colony of Ceylon changed its name in 1972 to Sri Lanka, which means “Blessed Isle.” Sri Lankans commemorate the granting of their independence from Great Britain on February 4, 1948, with public gatherings throughout the island and special services in the temples, churches, and mosques. There are also parades, folk dances, processions, and national games. More… Discuss

 

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*Breathing Techniques* (Yoga, Meditation, Relaxation, Stress, Cancer, Blood Pressure) Kapalbhati


*Breathing Techniques* (Yoga, Meditation, Relaxation, Stress, Cancer, Blood Pressure) Kapalbhati

Free Teachings: http://acharyashreeyogeesh.com 
Facebookhttp://fb.com/acharyashreeyogeesh
Spiritual Retreats & Classes: http://siddhayatan.org

Acharya Shree Yogeesh conducts his first online video tutorial which covers a breathing technique called kapalbhati. He describes kapalbhati’s history, purpose, and benefits of this ancient yogic breathing technique, and teaches you how to do it.

= About Acharya Shree Yogeesh =
Acharya Shree Yogeesh is a living enlightened master of this era and founder of the Siddhayatan Tirth and Spiritual Retreat, a unique 200+ acre spiritual pilgrimage site and meditation park in North America providing the perfect atmosphere for spiritual learning, community, and soul awakening to help truth seekers advance spiritually. Acharya Shree Yogeesh is also the founder of the Yogeesh Ashram near Los Angeles, California, Yogeesh Ashram International in New Delhi, India, and the Acharya Yogeesh Primary & Higher Secondary School in Haryana, India.

As an inspiring revolutionary spiritual leader and in-demand speaker worldwide, for over forty years Acharya Shree Yogeesh has dedicated his life to helping guide hundreds of thousands of people on their spiritual journey of self-improvement and self-realization. 

It is Acharya Shree Yogeesh’s mission to spread the message of nonviolence, vegetarianism, oneness, and total transformation. 

= Connect with Acharya Shree Yogeesh =
Teachings: http://acharyashreeyogeesh.com
Facebook: http://facebook.com/acharyashreeyogeesh
Spiritual Retreats: http://siddhayatan.org

= Connect with Sadhvi Siddhali Shree =
Free Book: http://siddhalishree.com
Facebook: http://facebook.com/siddhalishree

Other resources:
http://awakenchakras.com (Awaken Chakras, Activate Kundalini)
http://siddhalishree.com (Sadhvi Siddhali Shree, Spiritual Blog)
http://siddhayatan.org (Siddhayatan Spiritual Retreat and Ashram)
http://spiritualchildrenscamp.com (Spiritual Children’s Camp)

 

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