Tag Archives: Infectious Diseases

Rabies Still Claims Tens of Thousands of Lives Annually


Rabies Still Claims Tens of Thousands of Lives Annually

This may come as a surprise, but rabies still kills an estimated 55,000 people each year. This toll may seem high considering that a vaccine was developed more than a century ago, but the cost of prevention remains relatively high, and so the disease persists in poverty-stricken regions. Each year, more than 15 million people around the globe are treated for exposure to rabies. Experts argue that vaccinating animals is exponentially cheaper than treating people exposed after the fact, yet securing funding for such campaigns remains a challenge. More… Discuss

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news: Cancer in Refugee Camps


Cancer in Refugee Camps

Historically, combating infectious diseases and malnutrition have been the primary concerns of health workers in refugee camps. Unfortunately, this leaves those refugees with equally deadly but non-communicative and expensive-to-treat diseases, like cancer, with few treatment options. This is a growing problem, say researchers, as refugees today remain displaced for substantially longer periods than in the past and the numbers of those displaced have swelled considerably in recent years. Between 2010 and 2012, the UNHCR Exceptional Care Committee, which funds costly medical care for refugees, approved and funded just half of the applications from refugees in Jordan with cancer. More… Discuss

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: Max Theiler (1899)


Max Theiler (1899)

Born in South Africa, Theiler moved to the US in 1922 and became known for his research on yellow fever, encephalomyelitis, and other tropical viruses. At a time when yellow fever outbreaks were plague-like—one epidemic alone wiped out 20,000 people—his team proved that the disease is caused by a virus, not bacteria. Theiler’s development of a safe and effective vaccine brought yellow fever under control, earning him the 1951 Nobel Prize in medicine. On what did he initially test his vaccine?More… Discuss

 

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Today’s Birthday: ELIZABETH KENNY (1880)


Elizabeth Kenny (1880)

After breaking her wrist as a young girl, Kenny developed an interest in medicine and eventually became a nurse. While treating polio victims in her native Australia, she devised a treatment using hot compresses and passive exercise that differed drastically from the usual approach of immobilization. Kenny later brought her controversial treatment to the US, where it was initially met with skepticism but was ultimately accepted. What actor attributes his recovery from polio to these treatments? More… Discuss

 

Today”s Birthday: Thomas Sydenham (1624)


Thomas Sydenham (1624)

Known as “the English Hippocrates,” Sydenham was a physician who advocated direct observation instead of theorizing to determine the nature of disease. His conceptions of the causes and treatments of epidemics and his classic descriptions of gout, smallpox, malaria, and other maladies established him as a founder of modern clinical medicine and epidemiology. He introduced laudanum as a medication, helped popularize the use of quinine in treating malaria, and described what “dancing” disease? More… Discuss