Tag Archives: Iowa

quotation: P. G. Wodehouse (1881-1975)


Her pupils were at once her salvation and her despair. They gave her the means of supporting life, but they made life hardly worth supporting.

P. G. Wodehouse (1881-1975) Discuss

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word: insouciant


insouciant

Definition: (adjective) Marked by blithe unconcern.
Synonyms: casual, nonchalant
Usage: He showed an insouciant disregard for cold weather, wearing only a T-shirt in the show. Discuss.
Definition: (adjective) Marked by blithe unconcern.
Synonyms: casual, nonchalant
Usage: He showed an insouciant disregard for cold weather, wearing only a T-shirt in the show. Discuss.

Eu Rîd, gand poetic de George-B (the smudge and other poems)


Eu Rîd, gand poetic de George-B
(the smudge and other poems)

Mi s-a piedut cheia de acasa,
am pierdut cheia de la moara mea

am pierdut cheia de la masina,
de la barca cu moror,
am pierdur vaslele.
am pierdut duplicatul cheilor de mai sus,
si cine stie cate alte chei si duplicatele lor:  le-am pierdut!,
le-am jelit,
am tinut post dupa post,
parastase de 40 de zile, cu popmana, si coliva,
cu vanilie si nucsoara,
ca avem nucsoara acum, ce n-aveam inainte
noi copiii, generatiei fara speranta.

am pierdut cheia timpului si-a rostului lui – a timpului trecut…

acum pot sa spun: tot ce-a fost pierdut nimicu-i
in cumpana cu ce inca am sa pierd: si de-aceea rîd
cu gura pana la urechi eu rîd.

© George-B.

This Day in the Yesteryear: The Louisiana Purchase (1803)


This Day in the Yesteryear

The Louisiana Purchase (1803)

Early American settlers in the western territories depended on the Mississippi River‘s port of New Orleans for commerce. When Spain retroceded New Orleans to France in 1800, Americans feared their access to the river would be blocked, so President Thomas Jefferson sent negotiators to broker a deal for the port city. Why did Napoleon ultimately sell the entire Louisiana territory, including New Orleans, to the US for only about 4 cents per acre, or a sum total of $15 million? More… Discuss

Saint of the Day for Friday, November 28th, 2014: St. Catherine Laboure


Image of St. Catherine Laboure

St. Catherine Laboure

St. Catherine Laboure, virgin, was born on May 2, 1806. At an early age she entered the community of the Daughters of Charity, in Paris, France. Three times in 1830 the Virgin Mary appeared to St. … continue reading

More Saints of the Day

Antonín Dvořák – Suite in A Major “American”, Op. 98b, B 190: make music part ofyour life series


EAT YOUR SAUERKRAUT (YOGURT, KEFIR, AND BORSCH)



Around 5000 people made it downtown Des Moines, Iowa for the 9th annual Oktoberfest. Lots of bier, food, and great polka music.

Please visit
 http://healthyeatingrocks.com/2013/01/29/antibiotics-fermented-foods-and-your-health/comment-page-1/#comment-1642
for a great post on health benefits deriving from the consumption of sauerkraut and other probiotics

From Wikipedia:

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

Choucroute garnie, a traditional dish of Alsace (France), where sauerkraut is garnished with sausages and other pork products

Sauerkraut (/ˈsaʊərkrt/German pronunciation: [ˈzaʊ.ɐˌkʁaʊt] ( listen)), directly translated: “sour cabbage”, is finely cutcabbage that has been fermented by various lactic acid bacteria, including LeuconostocLactobacillus, and Pediococcus.[1][2] It has a long shelf-life and a distinctive sour flavor, both of which result from the lactic acid that forms when the bacteria ferment the sugars in the cabbage. Sauerkraut is also used as a condiment upon various foods, such as meat dishes and hot dogs.[3][4][[6]

History

Fermented foods have a long history in many cultures. Today, two of the most well-known instances of traditional fermented cabbage side dishes are sauerkraut and Korean kimchi.[7] The Roman writers Cato (in his De Agri Cultura) and Columella (in his De re Rustica) mentioned preserving cabbages and turnips with salt. It is believed to have been introduced to Europe in its present form 1,000 years later by Genghis Khan after invading China.[8][9] The Tartars took it in their saddlebags to Europe. There it took root mostly in Eastern European and Germanic cuisines, but also in other countries including France, where the name became choucroute.[10]

Before frozen foods, refrigeration, and cheap transport from warmer areas became readily available in northern and central Europe, sauerkraut, like other preserved foods, provided a source of nutrients during the winter. James Cook always took a store of sauerkraut on his sea voyages, since experience had taught him it preventedscurvy.[11][12]

Geographic distribution

In Germany, sauerkraut is often flavored with juniper berries. Traditionally it is served with pork, Strasbourg sausage or frankfurters, bacon, smoked pork or smoked Morteau or Montbéliard sausages, accompanied typically by roasted or steamed potatoes or dumplings.[13]

Sauerkraut is the main ingredient of the Alsatian meal choucroute garnie (French for dressed sauerkraut), sauerkraut with sausages and other salted meats and charcuterie, and often potatoes.

Sauerkraut is the most important ingredient in the shchi, a traditional soup of Russia where it has been known as far back as the 9th century, the time of the import of cabbage from Byzantium.

 

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This Day in the Yesteryear: “IS PAUL MCCARTNEY DEAD?” (1969)


“Is Paul McCartney Dead?” (1969)

If one is to believe the rumors, the real Paul McCartney died at the height of Beatlemania and was secretly replaced by a double. The precise origins of this urban legend are unknown, but it gained traction at around the time that the band was breaking up. This is attributed in part to an article published in an Iowa university student newspaper addressing the rumors and pointing to supposed clues in the band’s music and album artwork that alluded to the rocker’s death. What are some examples? More…Discuss