Tag Archives: joachim raff

Joachim Raff – Symphony No 11 in A minor, Op 214 – Philharmonia Hungarica Werner Andreas Albert, conductor


Joachim Raff – Symphony No 11 in A minor, Op 214 – Albert

Franz Liszt – Tasso, Lamento e Trionfo: make music part of your life series


Franz Liszt – Tasso, Lamento e Trionfo

FROM

Franz Liszt – Tasso, Lamento e Trionfo



Franz Liszt (October 22, 1811 — July 31, 1886) was a 19th-century Hungarian composer, pianist, conductor, and teacher.

Liszt became renowned throughout Europe during the nineteenth century for his virtuosic skill as a pianist. He was said by his contemporaries to have been the most technically advanced pianist of his age and perhaps the greatest pianist of all time.

Tasso, Lamento e Trionfo.

Franz Liszt composed his Tasso, Lamento e trionfo (Tasso, Lament and Triumph) in 1849, revising it in 1850-51 and again in 1854. It is numbered No. 2 in his cycle of 13 symphonic poems written during his Weimar period.

Liszt’s first sketch for this work is dated August 1, 1849. He had heard the principal theme for Tasso in Venice, Italy several years earlier, however, using it in the 1840 version of his piano piece “Chant do Goldolier” in Venezia e Napoli. Liszt completed the 1849 verion of Tasso as an overture in two sections, giving it to August Conradi to orchestrate. This version was performed in Weimar, Germany on the centennial of Johann Wolfgang von Goethe‘s birth as an overture to his drama Torquato Tasso. Liszt later corrected Conradi’s score and had Joachim Raff produce a new score in 1850–51. Liszt then revised this score extensively, adding a central section. This version was performed on April 19, 1854 in Weimar, conducted by Liszt.

Conductor: Michel Plasson
Orchestra: Dresdner Philharmonie

 

RICHTER – LISZT Piano CONCERTO No.1 in E Flat


Excerpts from Robert Cummings’ article:  “The genesis of Liszt’s Piano Concerto No. 1 in E flat major dates to 1830, when the composer sketched out the main theme in a notebook. It wasn’t until the 1840s, however, that Liszt actually commenced work on the concerto. As a neophyte in the art of orchestration — his output to that point consisted almost entirely of keyboard music — Liszt enlisted the assistance of his pupil Joachim Raff in providing the work an instrumental skin. Liszt completed the concerto in 1849 but made a number of revisions over the next several years. The final version of the work dates from 1856.”

Read more: http://www.answers.com/topic/piano-concerto-no-1-in-e-flat-major-s-124-lw-h4#ixzz1wyUzMamM