Tag Archives: Johann Strauss II


 


Andre Rieu – The Emperor Waltz (Kaiserwalzer) 2008

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Strauss: The Beautiful Blue Danube André Rieu/ the Johann Strauss Orchestra, great compositions/performances


André Rieu – The Beautiful Blue Danube

Giuseppe Verdi – Macbeth – Ballabili (Dances from Act III)


Giuseppe Verdi – Macbeth – Ballabili (Dances from Act III)

Andre Rieu – The Emperor Waltz (Kaiserwalzer) 2008 great compositions/performances


Andre Rieu – The Emperor Waltz (Kaiserwalzer) 2008

Wine, Women and Song – Johann Strauss Jr.


Johann Strauss II. – Geschichten aus dem Wiener Wald (Walzer, op.325): make music part of your life series


One Hour of Music – The Greatest Waltzes of All Time: great compositions/performances


One Hour of Music – The Greatest Waltzes of All Time

The Blue Danube, Op 314 Johann Strauss II in HD – unofficial Austrian national anthem! : make music part of your life series


The Blue Danube, Op 314 Johann Strauss II in HD – unofficial Austrian national anthem!

The Blue Danube is the common English title of An der schönen blauen Donau, Op. 314 (German for By the Beautiful Blue Danube), a waltz by the Austrian composer Johann Strauss II, composed in 1866. Originally performed 15 February 1867 at a concert of the Wiener Männergesangsverein (Vienna Men’s Choral Association), it has been one of the most consistently popular pieces of music in the classical repertoire. Its initial performance was only a mild success however and Strauss is reputed to have said “The devil take the waltz, my only regret is for the coda—I wish that had been a success!”

After the original music was written, the words were added by the Choral Association’s poet, Joseph Weyl. Strauss later added more music, and Weyl needed to change some of the words. Strauss adapted it into a purely orchestral version for the World’s Fair in Paris that same year, and it became a great success in this form. The instrumental version is by far the most commonly performed today. An alternate text by Franz von Gernerth, Donau so blau (Danube so blue), is also used on occasion. The Blue Danube premiered in the United States in its instrumental version on 1 July 1867 in New York, and in Great Britain in its choral version on 21 September 1867 in London at the promenade concerts at Covent Garden.

The specifically Viennese sentiments associated with the waltz have made it an unofficial Austrian national anthem. The waltz is traditionally broadcast by all public-law television and radio stations exactly at midnight on New Year’s Eve, and on New Year’s Day it is a customary encore piece at the annual Vienna New Year’s Concert. The first few bars are the interval signal of Österreichischer Rundfunk‘s international programs.

When Strauss’s stepdaughter, Alice von Meyszner-Strauss, asked the composer Johannes Brahms to sign her autograph-fan, he wrote down the first bars of The Blue Danube, but adding “Leider nicht von Johannes Brahms” (Alas! not by Johannes Brahms).

A typical performance lasts around 10 minutes, with the seven-minute main piece, followed by a three-minute coda.
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Audio source: Youtube Audio Library
Picture by: Ivanhoe
Picture license: CC BY-SA 3.0
Picture source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Bud…

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Happy Mother’s Day! Johann Strauss II – The Blue Danube Waltz – Vienna Philharmonic


[youtube.com/watch?v=PCge-suZLWw]

Happy Mother’s Day! Johann Strauss II – The Blue Danube WaltzVienna Philharmonic

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Vienna New Year’s Concert 2013 – Johann Strauss II: The Blue Danube, Waltz, op. 314



Make Music Part of Your Life Series:  Vienna New Year’s Concert 2013 – Johann Strauss II: The Blue Danube, Waltz, op. 314

 

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Classical Music Mix – Best Classical Pieces Part I (1/2)


Classical Music Mix – Best Classical Pieces Part I (1/2)

A mix with some of the best classical pieces in the world.

Compositions name list:

00:01 – Albinoni – Adagio in g minor
10:44 – Pachelbel – Canon in D major
16:55 – Beethoven – Moonlight Sonata
22:59 – Carlos GardelPor una cabeza
30:03 – Dmitri Shostakovich – Waltz no 2
33:52 – Eugen Doga – Grammofon
36:20 – Gheorghe Zamfir – The Lonely Shepherd
40:40 – Johann Strauss IIVienna Blood Waltz
47:46 – Johann Strauss II – Voices of Spring Waltz
53:31 – Juventino Rosas – Over the Waves Waltz
59:20 – Mozart – Rondo Alla Turca
1:02:57 – Mozart – Symphony 40 No 1
1:09:16 – Mozart – Lacrimosa
1:12:36 – Nino Rota – Vito’s Waltz
1:15:28 – Nobuo Uematsu – Dance With the Balamb-Fish
1:19:08 – Tchaikovsky – Sleeping Beauty Waltz
1:23:47 – Tchaikovsky – Swan Lake Waltz
1:30:41 – Tchaikovsky – Waltz of the Flowers
1:37:05 – Mozart – Serenade No 13

 

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Best Classical Music YouTube Collection: Classical Music Mix – Best Classical Pieces Part I (1/2)


Make this the best post of 2014: RATE, LIKE, COMMENT! Above all ENJOY!

Published on Feb 9, 2013: 4,590,957 views!

A mix with some of the best classical pieces in the world.

Compositions name list:

00:01 – Albinoni – Adagio in g minor
10:44 – Pachelbel – Canon in D major
16:55 – Beethoven – Moonlight Sonata
22:59 – Carlos GardelPor una cabeza
30:03 – Dmitri Shostakovich – Waltz no 2
33:52 – Eugen Doga – Grammofon
36:20 – Gheorghe Zamfir – The Lonely Shepherd
40:40 – Johann Strauss IIVienna Blood Waltz
47:46 – Johann Strauss II – Voices of Spring Waltz
53:31 – Juventino Rosas – Over the Waves Waltz
59:20 – Mozart – Rondo Alla Turca
1:02:57 – Mozart – Symphony 40 No 1
1:09:16 – Mozart – Lacrimosa
1:12:36 – Nino Rota – Vito’s Waltz
1:15:28 – Nobuo Uematsu – Dance With the Balamb-Fish
1:19:08 – Tchaikovsky – Sleeping Beauty Waltz
1:23:47 – Tchaikovsky – Swan Lake Waltz
1:30:41 – Tchaikovsky – Waltz of the Flowers
1:37:05 – Mozart – Serenade No 13

 

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Vienna New Years Concert 2010, Die Fledermaus Overture, Johann Strauss



From the New Years Day concert 2010 in Vienna. Johann StraussDie Fledermaus Overture. Upscaled to 720p.

Recorded from the BBC on 01 January 2010.

 

Geschichten aus dem Wienerwald op.325 – Johann Strauss II



Geschichten aus dem Wienerwald op.325 (Tales from Vienna Woods). Author: Johann Strauss II (1825-1899).
Conductor: Willi Boskovsky & Wiener Philharmoniker
Picture: Vienna Woods

Johann Strauss II – Die Fledermaus



Johann Strauss II or Johann Baptist Strauss – Die Fledermaus (Exceperts) “O Morcego”
Title : Johann Strauss II – Die Fledermaus Overture

From Wikipedia,
Die Fledermaus (in English: The Bat;’ in French: La Chauve-souris’) is an operetta composed by Johann Strauss II to a German libretto by Carl Haffner and Richard Genée.

The original source for Die Fledermaus is a farce by German playwright Julius Roderich Benedix (1811–1873), Das Gefängnis (The Prison). Continue reading

Johann Strauss II – The Blue Danube Waltz – Vienna Philharmonic



Vienna Philharmonic, 01.01.2011, New Year’s Concert, Conductor Franz Welser-Möst, Musikverein, German TV ZDF

Annen-Polka op. 117 – Johann Strauss II



Annen-Polka op 117 from Neujahrskonzert 2009. Author: Johann Strauss II (1825-1899).
Conductor: Daniel Barenboim & Wiener Philharmoniker

Wine, Women and Song: Johann Strauss (II)



Wein, Weib und Gesang (Wine, Woman, and Song), Op. 333, is a waltz by Johann Strauss II. It is a choral waltz in its original form,[1] although it is seldom heard in this version today. It was commissioned for the Vienna Men’s Choral Association’s so-called Fools’ Evening on 2 February 1869 with a dedication to the Association’s honorary chorus-master Johann Herbeck. Its fanciful title was drawn from an old adage: “Who loves not wine, women and song remains a fool his whole life long.”[2]

Strauss’ works at this age displays the Waltz King at the height of his creative powers, and it was no less evident in this waltz with its 137-bar introduction, combining tranquil melodies with superb orchestration. Its admirers include the famous opera composer Richard Wagner and Strauss’ good friend Johannes Brahms.

The waltz’s primary home key is in E-flat major, with its Introduction interpolating with B-flat major as well as B major. The first waltz melody, with its tapping quality is quintessentially Viennese in nature. Further waltz themes alternate between lush passion and good-humored cheekiness, ending with a swirling finish in the principal home key underlined by a brass fanfare and snare drumroll, as is the usual style of concluding a piece in Strauss’ works dating around that period.

Besides being a waltz, the title is also a German expression for having fun.