Tag Archives: Johannes Brahms

make music part of your life series: Johannes Brahms – Clarinet Sonata In E Flat Major Op. 120 No. 2


Johannes Brahms – Clarinet Sonata In E Flat Major Op. 120 No. 2

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historic musical bits: David Oistrakh – Brahms – Violin Sonata No 2 in A major, Op 100


David Oistrakh – Brahms – Violin Sonata No 2 in A major, Op 100

historic musical bits: Johannes Brahms – Symphony No.1 – Wiener Philharmoniker – Bernstein – 1981


Johannes Brahms – Symphony No.1 – Wiener Philharmoniker – Bernstein – 1981

great compositions/performances: Mahler: Pianokwartet in a kl.t. / Piano quartet in a minor


Mahler: Pianokwartet in a kl.t. / Piano quartet in a minor

historic musical bits: Schumann : Piano Quintet in E flat major, Op. 44 , Rudolf Serkin / Bush String Quartet (Rec. 1942)


Schumann : Piano Quintet in E flat major, Op. 44

historic musical bits: Johannes Brahms – Symphony No.1 – Wiener Philharmoniker – Bernstein – 1981


Johannes Brahms – Symphony No.1 – Wiener Philharmoniker – Bernstein – 1981

Schumann: Études Symphoniques Op. 13 , Emil Gilels, piano


Schumann: Études Symphoniques Op. 13 [Emil Gilels, piano]

Published on Jan 17, 2013

– Schumann: Études Symphoniques Op. 13 [Emil Gilels, piano]
http://www.entre88teclas.es/atdr/robe…

 

Best classical music, Leonard Bernstein, Brahms Tragic Overture Op.81, great compositions/performances


 

Leonard Bernstein, Brahms Tragic Overture Op.81

 

“Gaudeamus” , Best Classical Music, Bernstein – Academic Festival Overture (Brahms), great compositions/performances


Bernstein – Academic Festival Overture (Brahms)

Brahms Serenade No. 2 in A, Op. 16 LSO / Kertesz


Brahms Serenade No. 2 in A, Op. 16 LSO / Kertesz

Johannes Brahms – Hungarian Dance No. 4 – Poco sostenuto – Vivace , great compositions/performances


Johannes Brahms – Hungarian Dance No. 4 – Poco sostenuto – Vivace

Johannes Brahms – Theme & Variations in D minor


Johannes Brahms – Theme & Variations in D minor

Johannes Brahms – Hungarian Dance No. 4 – Poco sostenuto – Vivace


Johannes Brahms – Hungarian Dance No. 4 – Poco sostenuto – Vivace

Hilary Hahn plays Johannes Brahms Violin Concerto in D Op 77


Hilary Hahn plays Johannes Brahms Violin Concerto in D Op 77

Johannes Brahms – Serenade No.1 in D-major, Op.11 (1857) , Orchestra,: Capella Agustina Conductor,: Andreas Spering


Johannes Brahms – Serenade No.1 in D-major, Op.11 (1857)

Kempff – Brahms Capriccio op.116 no.3 in G minor


Kempff – Brahms Capriccio op.116 no.3 in G minor

Historic musical Bits: Brahms / Herbert von Karajan, 1957: Variations On A Theme By Haydn, Op. 56a , great compositions/performances


Brahms / Herbert von Karajan, 1957: Variations On A Theme By Haydn, Op. 56a – Complete

JOHANNES BRAHMS- Serenade Nº2 A, Op. 16


JOHANNES BRAHMS.- Serenade Nº2 A, Op. 16

Mendelssohn Piano Quartet No. 2 in F minor, Op. 2, Adagio , great compositions/performances


Mendelssohn Piano Quartet No. 2 in F minor, Op. 2, Adagio

Piano at Nataf, 2nd Season, Concert No. 3, 17.2.2012 (2.3.M.2) Felix Mendelssohn Piano Quartet No. 2 in F minor, Op. 2, 2. Adagio The Israel Piano Quartet: Revital Hachamoff, piano; Gilad Hildesheim, violin; Shuli Waterman, viola; Ira Givol, cello More music by Felix Mendelssohn at euzicasa:

HERE

HERE

HERE

Thanks for visiting and enjoying classical music! GEorge-B 🙂

Brahms: Symphony No.4 in E minor – Bernstein / Wiener Philharmoniker. , great compositions/performances


Brahms: Symphony No.4 in E minor – Bernstein / Wiener Philharmoniker

Published on Aug 9, 2013

Johannes Brahms: Symphony No.4 in E minor, Op.98

I. Allegro non troppo (00:00)
II. Andante moderato (13:33)
III. Allegro giocoso (27:19)
IV. Allegro energico e passionato (33:47)

Wiener Philharmoniker
Leonard Bernstein, conductor

September 8, 1988, Luzern

Johannes Brahms – Alto Rhapsody, Op. 53 & Tragic Overture, Op. 81 Chrissta Ludwig Otto Klamperer the philharmonic orchestra and Chorus, great compositions/performances


Johannes Brahms – Alto Rhapsody, Op. 53 & Tragic Overture, Op. 81

Respighi: Ancient Airs and Dances, Suite No. 3,: great compositions/performances


Respighi: Ancient Airs and Dances, Suite No. 3

Clara Schumann: Piano Concerto Op. 7 – Francesco Nicolosi


Clara Schumann: Piano Concerto Op. 7 – Francesco Nicolosi

Valentina Lisitsa plays Chopin Variations Op 2 (1 and 2): great compositions/performances



[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AsG_YL-o9ZE[/embed]

Chopin Variations Op 2 (1 and 2) Valentina Lisitsa

Horowitz plays Schumann Blumenstück (1966 live): great compositions/performances


Horowitz plays Schumann Blumenstück (1966 live)

Rimsky Korsakov – Dance Of The Tumblers -: make music pat of your life series


Rimsky Korsakov – Dance Of The Tumblers –

Great musical recordings: Brahms – Wilhelm Kempff 1950’s legacy (op. 10, 24, 76,79,116,117,118,119): Great compositions/performances


Brahms – Wilhelm Kempff 1950’s legacy (op. 10, 24, 76,79,116,117,118,119)

Luigi Rodolfo Boccherini: Cello Concerto No.3 in D major, (G.476): make music part of your life series


Luigi Rodolfo Boccherini: Cello Concerto No.3 in D major, (G.476)

Saint-Saëns Cello Concerto 1 & 2, Suite for Cello & Orchestra Op.16, and other works – S. Isserlis: make music part of your life series


Saint-Saëns Cello Concerto 1 & 2, Suite for Cello & Orchestra Op.16, and other works – S. Isserlis

Emil Gilels – Schumann – Symphonic Etudes, Op 13: Great compositions/performances


Emil Gilels – Schumann – Symphonic Etudes, Op 13

Kempff – Brahms Capriccio op.76 no.2 in B minor: great compositons/performances


Kempff – Brahms Capriccio op.76 no.2 in B minor

Piano Trio No. 4 in e minor, Op. 90 (Dumky) – Antonin Dvorak: make music part of your life series


Antonín Dvořák – String Quartet in E flat major, Op. 51 ‘Slawisches’ |great compositions/performances


Antonín DvořákString Quartet in E flat major, Op. 51 ‘Slawisches’

Brahms, J. – Tragic Overture, Op. 81 (Tragische Ouvertüre): great compositions/performances


Brahms, J. – Tragic Overture, Op. 81

Johannes Brahms – Trio in A minor op. 114: make music part of your life series


JOHANNES BRAHMS.- Serenade Nº2 A-Dur Op 16: make music part of oyur life series


JOHANNES BRAHMS.- Serenade Nº2 A-Dur Op 16

Quintet in G minor Op. 49 by Enrique Granados: make music part ofyour life series


Quintet in G minor Op. 49 by Enrique Granados
I. Allegro

Maria Overman, Susanna Haley, violins
Gina Lee, viola
Anna Conway, violoncello
Heliqiong Sun, piano

Wieniawski – Polonaise brilliante (LEONID KOGAN): Great compositions/performances


Wieniawski – Polonaise brilliante (LEONID KOGAN)

Sergei Rachmaninoff -Symphonic Dances, Op. 45: great compositions/performances


Sergei Rachmaninoff –Symphonic Dances, Op. 45

Chopin – Etude Op.25 No.11 (‘Winter Wind’) – Sviatoslav Richter – Video: Unique musical moments


ChopinEtude Op.25 No.11 (‘Winter Wind‘) – Sviatoslav Rich

Johannes Brahms – Symphony No.3 in F, Op.90: great compositions/performances


Johannes BrahmsSymphony No.3 in F, Op.90

Brahms Rhapsody Op 119 No 4 in E Flat Major Rubinstein Rec 1941: great compositions/performances


Brahms Rhapsody Op 119 No 4 in E Flat Major Rubinstein Rec 1941

Brahms: Symphony No.4 in E minor – Bernstein / Wiener Philharmoniker: great compositions/performances


Brahms: Symphony No.4 in E minor – Bernstein / Wiener Philharmoniker

Johannes Brahms: Symphony No.4 in E minor, Op.98

I. Allegro non troppo (00:00)
II. Andante moderato (13:33)
III. Allegro giocoso (27:19)
IV. Allegro energico e passionato (33:47)

Wiener Philharmoniker
Leonard Bernstein, conductor

(September 8, 1988, Luzern)

The Blue Danube, Op 314 Johann Strauss II in HD – unofficial Austrian national anthem! : make music part of your life series


The Blue Danube, Op 314 Johann Strauss II in HD – unofficial Austrian national anthem!

The Blue Danube is the common English title of An der schönen blauen Donau, Op. 314 (German for By the Beautiful Blue Danube), a waltz by the Austrian composer Johann Strauss II, composed in 1866. Originally performed 15 February 1867 at a concert of the Wiener Männergesangsverein (Vienna Men’s Choral Association), it has been one of the most consistently popular pieces of music in the classical repertoire. Its initial performance was only a mild success however and Strauss is reputed to have said “The devil take the waltz, my only regret is for the coda—I wish that had been a success!”

After the original music was written, the words were added by the Choral Association’s poet, Joseph Weyl. Strauss later added more music, and Weyl needed to change some of the words. Strauss adapted it into a purely orchestral version for the World’s Fair in Paris that same year, and it became a great success in this form. The instrumental version is by far the most commonly performed today. An alternate text by Franz von Gernerth, Donau so blau (Danube so blue), is also used on occasion. The Blue Danube premiered in the United States in its instrumental version on 1 July 1867 in New York, and in Great Britain in its choral version on 21 September 1867 in London at the promenade concerts at Covent Garden.

The specifically Viennese sentiments associated with the waltz have made it an unofficial Austrian national anthem. The waltz is traditionally broadcast by all public-law television and radio stations exactly at midnight on New Year’s Eve, and on New Year’s Day it is a customary encore piece at the annual Vienna New Year’s Concert. The first few bars are the interval signal of Österreichischer Rundfunk‘s international programs.

When Strauss’s stepdaughter, Alice von Meyszner-Strauss, asked the composer Johannes Brahms to sign her autograph-fan, he wrote down the first bars of The Blue Danube, but adding “Leider nicht von Johannes Brahms” (Alas! not by Johannes Brahms).

A typical performance lasts around 10 minutes, with the seven-minute main piece, followed by a three-minute coda.
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Audio source: Youtube Audio Library
Picture by: Ivanhoe
Picture license: CC BY-SA 3.0
Picture source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Bud…

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ANTONIN DVORAK.- Rhapsody en Re mayor Op. 45 Nº1: great compositions/performances



From Carlos Garcia Carlos Garcia

ANTONIN DVORAK.- Rhapsody en Re mayor Op. 45 Nº1

ANTONIN DVORAK.-
Rhapsody en Re mayor Op. 45 Nº1

1. Allegro con moto
2. Allegro ma non troppo-Moderato
3. Andante maestoso-Allegro assai

Orquesta Filarmónica Checa
Director: Václav Neuman
Fecha y año de composición 1878
Dedicatoria Baron Paul von Dervies
Estilo Romantic

Instrumentación: Piccolo, 2 Flutes, 2 Oboes, 2 Clarinets, 2 Bassoons, 4 Horns, 2 Trumpets, 3 Trombones, Timpani, Bass Drum, Cymbals, Triangle, Harp, Violins I, Violins II, Violas, Cellos, Double Basses.

1878 fue un año importante para Antonín Dvorák : Dvorák amigo de Johannes Brahms le ayudó a levantar desde el pozo de la oscuridad haciendo los arreglos para la publicación alemana de sus Duetos moravos; en consecuencia, recibió el encargo del primer volumen de sus Danzas eslavas que, hasta el día de hoy, siguen siendo, junto con el “Nuevo Mundo” Symphony, Dvorák música más conocidas. Estos eventos marcan el inicio de Dvorák llamado períodos eslavo “(finales de 1870 a principios de 1880), durante el cual él respondió directamente a la demanda del público y de los deseos de su editor por componer música explícitamente bohemio / Checo / Morava de tono, el estilo, y en cierta medida, de diseño. Las tres eslava rapsodias para orquesta, op. 45, de 1878, son las más grandes manifestaciones de esa financieramente rentable vena musical.

El primero de los tres eslava rapsodias en re mayor, op. 45/1, fue compuesto durante febrero y marzo de 1878 y por lo tanto en realidad es anterior a las Danzas eslavas; N º 2 en sol menor y n º 3 en La bemol mayor que siguió en el otoño y principios del invierno, respectivamente. La orquesta empleada es bastante grande; el contingente habitual de los vientos y las cuerdas se ve aumentada por el arpa y una brigada de percusión de tamaño considerable. Las tres piezas se unen para formar un ciclo de clases, aunque casi nunca se oye hablar de ellos interpretados juntos como un conjunto.
La característica más memorable del N º 1 es el episodio-march como central, mientras que el No. 2 se distingue por sus numerosos cambios entre 3/4 y 4/4. La tercera eslava Rhapsody se abre con un solo de arpa cuya sustancia es inmediatamente absorbido por los instrumentos de viento, y procede a explorar una serie de melodías de buen carácter; la gran culminación parece disolverse elusively sin una resolución final, pero al final dos acordes brillantes dibujar la pieza a la cadencia que anhelamos

1878 was an important year for Antonín Dvorák: Dvorák friend Johannes Brahms helped him lift from the pit of darkness making arrangements for the German publication of his Moravian Duets; consequently, he was commissioned the first volume of his Slavonic Dances that until today, remain, along with the “New World” Symphony, Dvorák‘s music known. These events mark the beginning of Dvorák Slavonic called periods (late 1870s to early 1880s), during which he answered directly to the public demand and the wishes of his editor to compose music specifically Bohemian / Czech / Moravian tone , style, and to some extent, design. Slavic Three rhapsodies for orchestra, op. 45, 1878, are the largest demonstrations that financially rewarding musical vein.

The first of the three Slavonic Rhapsodies in D major, op. 45/1, was composed during February and March 1878 and therefore actually predates the Slavonic Dances; No. 2 in G minor and No. 3 in sun-flat major followed in the fall and early winter, respectively. The orchestra employed is quite large; the usual contingent of winds and strings is augmented by harp and percussion brigade of considerable size. The three pieces come together to form a cycle of classes, but almost never hear of them performed together as a whole.
The most memorable feature of the No. 1-march is the central episode, while No. 2 was distinguished by its many changes between 3.4 and 4.4. The third Slavonic Rhapsody opens with a harp solo whose substance is immediately absorbed by the wind instruments, and proceeds to explore a number of tunes of good character; seems to dissolve the grand climax elusively without a final resolution, but in the end two bright chords drawing the piece to the cadence that yearn

Clara Schumann


Clara Schumann

Schumann, the wife of composer Robert Schumann, was a renowned pianist of her time. A child prodigy, she made her debut in 1830 and later performed with great success all over Europe. She was an outstanding interpreter of works by her husband and Johannes Brahms and was one of the first pianists to perform from memory. Her own compositions were mainly piano pieces and songs. Schumann supported her family financially and organized her own concert tours while also raising how many children? More… Discuss

Luigi Boccherini – String Quintet in E maj Opus 11 No 5 G275: make music part of your life series



FROM:

Luigi Boccherini – String Quintet in E maj Opus 11 No 5 G275

I Amoroso
II Allegro e con spirito
III Minuetto, trio
IV Rondeau, andante

Performed by La Magnifica Comunità

Brahms viola sonata op. 120 no. 2 in E flat major: great compositions/performances



FROM:

Brahms viola sonata op. 120 no. 2 in E flat major

Piano: Daniel Barenboim
Viola: Pinchas Zukerman
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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The viola sonata is a sonata for viola, sometimes with other instruments, usually piano. The earliest viola sonatas are difficult to date for a number of reasons:

  • in the Baroque era, there were many works written for the viola da gamba, including sonatas (the most famous being Johann Sebastian Bach‘s three, now most often played on the cello)
  • in the Classical era and early Romantic, there were few works written with viola specifically in mind as solo instrument, and many of these, like those of the Stamitz family, may have been written for the viola d’amore, like most of their viola works – though it is now customary to play them on the viola; it was more typical to publish a work or set, like George Onslow‘s opus 16 cello sonatas, or Johannes Brahms‘s opus 120 clarinet sonatas in the late 19th century, that specified the viola as an alternate. Two early exceptions were the viola sonatas of Felix Mendelssohn (1824, posthumously published around 1981) and the opus 1 sonata of the composer Ernst Naumann (1832-1910), published in 1854.

Brahms-Violin Sonata No. 2 in A Major Op. 100: make music part of your life series


BrahmsViolin Sonata No. 2 in A Major Op. 100

FROM:
Kanaal van viool7

Isaac Stern: violin-Myra Hess: piano-Live-Edinburgh-1960

Gustavo Dudamel Johannes Brahms variations sur un thème de Joseph Haydn en si Majeur opus 56a: great compositions/performances


Gustavo Dudamel Johannes Brahms variations sur un thème de Joseph Haydn en si Majeur opus 56a

FROM:

Maxime Brisole

From Wikipedia

Les Variations sur un thème de Haydn, op. 56 (allemand : Variationen über ein Thema von Haydn) est une œuvre orchestrale en variations de Johannes Brahms, composée pendant l’été 1873. Cette œuvre est constituée d’un thème en si bémol majeur, de huit variations et d’un finale.

Le thème est extrait du choral Saint-Antoine de la Feldpartie en si bémol majeur, Hob. II/46 de Joseph Haydn. Brahms a écrit huit variations sur ce thème, plus un final. Le finale est une passacaille magnifique, dont le point culminant, une reformulation du choral, est un moment d’une grande transcendance, au point que Brahms, habituellement austère, se permet l’utilisation d’un triangle.

Deux versions existent : une version pour deux pianos, celle que Brahms a écrite en premier (mais désignée Op. 56b), et une version pour orchestre, dénommée op. 56a.

Cette dernière version est considérée comme « la première série de variations indépendantes pour orchestre dans l’histoire de la musique »1. L’orchestre contient un piccolo, deux flûtes deux hautbois, deux clarinettes, deux bassons, un contrebasson, quatre cors (2 en mi bémol, 2 en si bémol), 2 trompettes, des timbales, un triangle ainsi que la composition habituelle des cordes (premiers et seconds violons, altos, violoncelles et contrebasses).

Les Variations sur un thème de Haydn, op. 56 (allemand : Variationen über ein Thema von Haydn) est une œuvre orchestrale en variations de Johannes Brahms, composée pendant l’été 1873. Cette œuvre est constituée d’un thème en si bémol majeur, de huit variations et d’un finale.

Le thème est extrait du choral Saint-Antoine de la Feldpartie en si bémol majeur, Hob. II/46 de Joseph Haydn. Brahms a écrit huit variations sur ce thème, plus un final. Le finale est une passacaille magnifique, dont le point culminant, une reformulation du choral, est un moment d’une grande transcendance, au point que Brahms, habituellement austère, se permet l’utilisation d’un triangle.

Deux versions existent : une version pour deux pianos, celle que Brahms a écrite en premier (mais désignée Op. 56b), et une version pour orchestre, dénommée op. 56a.

Cette dernière version est considérée comme « la première série de variations indépendantes pour orchestre dans l’histoire de la musique »1. L’orchestre contient un piccolo, deux flûtes deux hautbois, deux clarinettes, deux bassons, un contrebasson, quatre cors (2 en mi bémol, 2 en si bémol), 2 trompettes, des timbales, un triangle ainsi que la composition habituelle des cordes (premiers et seconds violons, altos, violoncelles et contrebasses).