Tag Archives: John the Baptist

Pope John Paul II Visits Mosque (2001)


Pope John Paul II Visits Mosque (2001)

When Pope John Paul II visited Syria’s Umayyad Mosque, where the head of John the Baptist—a holy figure in both Christianity and Islam—is said to be interred, he became the first Catholic Pope to enter and pray in an Islamic mosque. The address he delivered there, promoting peace between Muslims and Christians, reflected his ongoing ecumenical efforts, which included meeting with religious leaders from other faiths and denominations. While in Syria, the pope aroused controversy by kissing what? More… Discuss

Saint of the Day for Friday, January 2nd, 2015: St. Basil the Great


Image of St. Basil the Great

St. Basil the Great

St. Basil the Great was born at Caesarea of Cappadocia in 330. He was one of ten children of St. Basil the Elder and St. Emmelia. Several of his brothers and sisters are honored among the saints. He … continue reading

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Saint of the Day for Sunday, November 30th, 2014 Image of St. Andrew: Patron Saint of Romania


Image of St. Andrew

St. Andrew

Andrew, like his brother Simon Peter, was a fisherman. He became a disciple of the great St. John the Baptist, but when John pointed to Jesus and said, “Behold the Lamb of God!” Andrew understood … continue reading

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Saint Andrew in Romania

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

Church of Saint Andrew in Ion Corvin, Constanța (completed 2002)

Church of Saint Andrew in Ion Corvin, Constanța (completed 2002)

The story of Saint Andrew in Romania tells that today’s territory of Romania was Christianized by Saint Andrew in the 1st century AD. These claims are backed by some historians and by several Christian artifacts discovered and dated to the third century BC.[1][2]

The story is based on references by 3rd century writer Hippolytus of Rome in “On Apostles”, mentioning Saint Andrew’s voyage to Scythia and on works by several authors which also mention the voyage, such as: Eusebius in the Chronicles of Eusebius,[3] Origen in the third book of his Commentaries on the Genesis (254 C.E.), Usaard in his Martyrdom written between 845-865, and Jacobus de Voragine in the Golden Legend (c. 1260). Scythia generally refers to a land in what is now Romania (Scythia Minor), Ukraine and southern Russia.

The Story

Historian Alexandru Barnea states that a tale started to circulate in the first half of the 20th century.[4] It tells of Saint Andrew’s arrival in Dobruja during a harsh winter, fighting wild beasts and the blizzard before reaching a cave. At the cave, Saint Andrew hit the ground with his walking stick and a spring came in to being, in the waters of which he baptized the locals and cured the ill, thus converting the whole area to Christianity.[4] This tale seems to be heavily based on the Chronicles of Eusebius.

According to some modern Romanian scholars, the idea of early Christianisation is unsustainable. They take the idea to be a part of an ideology of protochronism which purports that the Orthodox Church has been a companion and defender of the Romanian people for its entire history, which was then used for propaganda purposes during the communist era.[5] However, other works indicate that communists did not use this idea for propaganda but rather acted strongly against religion, persecuting Christians and promoting atheism as the belief system.[6][7][8]

Romanian researcher, George Alexandrou,[9] maintains that St. Andrew spent 20 years in the territories of the Daco-Romans, preaching and teaching. During that period St. Andrew traveled around the Lower Danube territories and along the coast of the Black Sea, but mostly he stayed in and around his cave in Dobruja (located in the vicinity of the Ion Corvin village). St. Andrew’s cave is still kept as a holy place. Later, John Cassian (360-435), Dionysius Exiguus (470-574) and Joannes Maxentius (leader of the so-called Scythian Monks) lived in the same area, known as Scythia Minor or Dobruja, in South East Romania.[10]

Saint Andrew’s Cave

According to Hippolyte of Antioch, (died c. 250 C.E.) in his On Apostles, Origen, in the third book of his Commentaries on the Genesis (254 C.E.), Eusebius of Caesarea in his Church History (340 C.E.), and other sources, like the Usaard’s Martyrdom written between 845-865, and Jacobus de Voragine in Golden Legend (c. 1260), Saint Andrew preached in Scythia Minor. St. Philip may have also preached in the area.[11] There are toponyms and numerous very old traditions (like carols) related to Saint Andrew, many of them having probably a pre-Christian substratum.[12][13][14] In Dobruja, a cave where he supposedly preached, is called “Saint Andrew’s Cave” and advertised as a pilgrimage site.

According to Radu Cinpoes (Cimpoesh?), there is no clear evidence concerning missionary work on the part of St. Andrew near Dobruja.[15]

Patron saint of Romania

In 1994, Saint Andrew was named the patron saint of Dobruja (Rom. Dobrogea), in 1997 the patron saint of Romania, while in 2012, November 30 became a public holiday.[4]
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word: foible


foible

Definition: (noun) A minor weakness or failing of character.
Synonyms: fault, defect, imperfection
Usage: His father’s foibles did not prevent his son from loving and honoring him. Discuss.

thoday’s holiday: Maidens’ Fair on Mount Gaina


Maidens’ Fair on Mount Gaina

The Maidens’ Fair is a major folk festival held at Mount Gaina in Transylvania, Romania. It was originally a marriage fair, where young men came to choose their future wives, but is now an opportunity for people to display their talents in handicrafts, costume making, singing, and dancing. Thousands of people gather for the events of the fair, which include dance competitions and concerts by folk bands and singers. Other aspects of the festival are feasts and bonfires, and the chanting of satirical verses during certain folk dances. More…
[youtube.com/watch?v=_kO_NPMPhH8]

TARGUL DE FETE DE PE MUNTELE GAINA

Published on Dec 5, 2012

PRODUCTIE MEDIA NELSTILL-filme de prezentare obiective turistice, hoteluri, pensiuni
Contact: office@nelstill.com http://www.nelstill.com
http://videohive.net/user/nels/portfo…

Saint John the Baptist


John the Baptist

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
John the Baptist
Veneto 0036.jpg

John the Baptist by Bartolomeo Veneto, 16th century
Prophet, Martyr, Saint
Born Late 1st century BCE
Herodian Judea
Died CE 31 – 36[1][2][3][4][5]
MachaerusPerea
Honored in Aglipayan ChurchAnglicanism,Assyrian Church of the East,Bahá’í FaithEastern Orthodox ChurchIslamLutheranism,MandeanismOriental Orthodox ChurchesRoman Catholic Churches
Canonized Pre-Congregation
Majorshrine Church of St John the Baptist,Jerusalem
Feast June 24 (Nativity),
August 29 (Beheading),
January 7 (Synaxis,
Eastern Orthodox),
Thout 2 (Coptic Orthodox Church)
Attributes Camel-skin robe, cross, lamb, scroll with words “Ecce Agnus Dei“, platter with own head, pouring water from hands orscallop shell
Patronage Patron saint of JordanPuerto RicoKnights Hospitaller of Jerusalem, French Canada,NewfoundlandCesenaFlorence,GenoaMonzaPortoSan Juan,TurinXewkija, and many other places.

John the Baptist (Hebrew: יוחנן המטביל, Yoḥanan ha-mmaṭbil, Arabic: يوحنا المعمدان‎ Yuhanna Al-Ma’madan,[6] Aramaic: ܝܘܚܢܢ Ioḥanan, Classical Armenian: Յովհաննէս Մկրտիչ Yovhannēs Mkrtičʿ,Greek: Ὁ Ἅγιος/Τίμιος Ἐνδοξος Προφήτης, Πρόδρομος καὶ Βαπτιστής Ἰωάννης Ho Hágios/Tímios Endoxos, Prophḗtēs, Pródromos, kaì Baptistḗs Ioánnes)[3][7][8][9][10] was an itinerant preacher[11] and a major religious figure[12] in ChristianityIslam,[13] the Bahá’í Faith,[14] and Mandaeism.

John is described as having the unique practice of baptism for the forgiveness of sins.[15] Most scholars agree that John baptized Jesus.[16][17] Scholars generally believe Jesus was a follower or disciple of John[18][19][20] and several New Testament accounts report that some of Jesus’s early followers had previously been followers of John.[21] John the Baptist is also mentioned by Jewish historianJosephus.[22] Some scholars maintain that John was influenced by the semi-ascetic Essenes, who expected an apocalypse and practiced rituals corresponding strongly with baptism,[23] although no direct evidence substantiates this.[24]

According to the New Testament, John anticipated a messianic figure greater than himself,[25] and Jesus was the one whose coming John foretold. Christians commonly refer to John as the precursor or forerunner of Jesus,[26] since John announces Jesus’ coming. John is also identified with the prophetElijah.[21]

 

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One of the First Major Outbreaks of St. John’s Dance (1374)


One of the First Major Outbreaks of St. John’s Dance (1374)

Germany was the site of one of the first outbreaks of dancing mania, a phenomenon seen primarily in mainland Europe between the 14th and 17th centuries. During such outbreaks, groups of up to thousands of people would dance uncontrollably, screaming, shouting, and claiming to have visions until they collapsed from exhaustion. Initially considered a curse sent by a saint, usually St. John the Baptist, it was called “St. John’s Dance.” To what do researchers now attribute the strange behavior? More… Discuss