Tag Archives: joseph conrad

quotation: Joseph Conrad


I take it that what all men are really after is some form or perhaps only some formula of peace.

Joseph Conrad (1857-1924) Discuss

Advertisements

It’s only those who do nothing that make no mistakes, I suppose. Joseph Conrad


It’s only those who do nothing that make no mistakes, I suppose.

Joseph Conrad (1857-1924) Discuss

quotation: “It’s extraordinary how we go through life with eyes half shut, with dull ears, with dormant thoughts….” (Joseph Conrad (1857-1924))


It’s extraordinary how we go through life with eyes half shut, with dull ears, with dormant thoughts. Perhaps it’s just as well; and it may be that it is this very dullness that makes life to the incalculable majority so supportable and so welcome.

Joseph Conrad (1857-1924) Discuss

Quotation: “I saw a creature, naked, bestial, Who, squatting upon the ground, Held his heart in his hands, And ate of it.” – Stephen Crane (1871-1900)


Quotation of the Day

I saw a creature, naked, bestial,
Who, squatting upon the ground,
Held his heart in his hands,
And ate of it.”Stephen Crane (1871-1900) Discuss

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

 

Formal portrait of Stephen Crane taken in Washington, D.C., about March 1896

Stephen Crane (November 1, 1871 – June 5, 1900) was an American author. Prolific throughout his short life, he wrote notable works in the Realist tradition as well as early examples of American Naturalism and Impressionism. He is recognized by modern critics as one of the most innovative writers of his generation.

The eighth surviving child of Protestant Methodist parents, Crane began writing at the age of four and had published several articles by the age of 16. Having little interest in university studies, he left college in 1891 to work as a reporter and writer. Crane’s first novel was the 1893 Bowery tale Maggie: A Girl of the Streets, generally considered by critics to be the first work of American literary Naturalism. He won international acclaim in 1895 for his Civil War novel The Red Badge of Courage, which he wrote without having any battle experience.

In 1896, Crane endured a highly publicized scandal after appearing as a witness in the trial of a suspected prostitute, an acquaintance named Dora Clark. Late that year he accepted an offer to travel to Cuba as a war correspondent. As he waited in Jacksonville, Florida, for passage, he met Cora Taylor, the madam of a brothel, with whom he began a lasting relationship. En route to Cuba, Crane’s ship sank off the coast of Florida, leaving him and others adrift for several days in a dinghy. Crane described the ordeal in “The Open Boat“. During the final years of his life, he covered conflicts in Greece (accompanied by Cora, recognized as the first woman war correspondent) and later lived in England with her. He was befriended by writers such as Joseph Conrad and H. G. Wells. Plagued by financial difficulties and ill health, Crane died of tuberculosis in a Black Forest sanatorium in Germany at the age of 28.

At the time of his death, Crane was considered an important figure in American literature. After he was nearly forgotten for two decades, critics revived interest in his life and work. Crane’s writing is characterized by vivid intensity, distinctive dialects, and irony. Common themes involve fear, spiritual crises and social isolation. Although recognized primarily for The Red Badge of Courage, which has become an American classic, Crane is also known for his poetry, journalism, and short stories such as “The Open Boat”, “The Blue Hotel“, “The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky“, and The Monster. His writing made a deep impression on 20th-century writers, most prominent among them Ernest Hemingway, and is thought to have inspired the Modernists and the Imagists.

Crane’s gravestone in Evergreen Cemetery

 

Battle of Chancellorsville by Kurz and Allison; Crane’s realistic portrayal of war has earned him recognition from numerous critics and scholars throughout the years

 

quotation: You shall judge of a man by his foes as well as by his friends. Joseph Conrad (1857-1924)


You shall judge of a man by his foes as well as by his friends.Joseph Conrad (1857-1924) Discuss

quotation: Joseph Conrad on courage


The last thing a woman will consent to discover in a man whom she loves, or on whom she simply depends, is want of courage.

Joseph Conrad (1857-1924) Discuss

QUOTATION: Joseph Conrad ABOUT UNLAWFUL AMBITIONS


All ambitions are lawful except those which climb upward on the miseries or credulities of mankind.

Joseph Conrad (1857-1924) Discuss

 

All ambitions are lawful except those which climb upward on the miseries or credulities of mankind.

 

Today’s Birthday: SIR HENRY MAXIMILIAN BEERBOHM (1872)


Sir Henry Maximilian Beerbohm (1872)

A charming, witty, and elegant English caricaturist and writer, Beerbohm used his pen to parody whatever was pretentious, affected, or absurd in his famous and fashionable contemporaries. His works include A Christmas Garland, a collection of parodies on such authors as Joseph Conrad and Thomas Hardy; Zuleika Dobson, an amusing satire on Oxford and his only novel; and Caricatures of Twenty-five Gentlemen, his first book of drawings. Who dubbed him “the incomparable Max“?More… Discuss

 

Quotation: Joseph Conrad


Let a fool be made serviceable according to his folly.

Joseph Conrad (1857-1924) Discuss

Quotation: Joseph Conrad on Almighty Hunger and powerless Hungry…


No fear can stand up to hunger, no patience can wear it out, disgust simply does not exist where hunger is; and as to superstition, beliefs, and what you may call principles, they are less than chaff in a breeze.

Joseph Conrad (1857-1924) Discuss

Quotation: Joseph Conrad (1857-1924) on Fear (fear of the UNKNOWN)


How does one kill fear, I wonder? How do you shoot a specter through the heart, slash off its spectral head, take it by its spectral throat?

Joseph Conrad (1857-1924) Discuss

Quotation: Joseph Conrad (1857-1924) – on Inspiration


 I dare say I am compelled, unconsciously compelled, now to write volume after volume, as in past years I was compelled to go to sea, voyage after voyage. Leaves must follow upon each other as leagues used to follow in the days gone by, on and on to the appointed end, which, being truth itself, is one—one for all men and for all occupations.

Joseph Conrad (1857-1924) Discuss

Today’s Quotation: Joseph Conrad (1857-1924) on Colonialism – Never a pretty thing


The conquest of the earth, which mostly means the taking it away from those who have a different complexion or slightly flatter noses than ourselves, is not a pretty thing when you look into it.

Joseph Conrad (1857-1924) Discuss