Tag Archives: Joseph Haydn

make music part of your life series: Mozart – String Quartet No. 14 in G, K. 387 (“Spring”)


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5BS_rG_XZ0Y%5B/emebed%5D

Mozart – String Quartet No. 14 in G, K. 387 [complete] (Spring)

Claudio Abbado Conductor: “Haydn Variations” Brahms, great compositions/performances


 

BEETHOVEN Symphony No 6 (Pastoral) in F Op 68 LEONARD BERNSTEIN, great compositions/performances


BEETHOVEN Symphony No 6 (Pastoral) in F Op 68 LEONARD BERNSTEIN

Johannes Brahms – Alto Rhapsody, Op. 53 & Tragic Overture, Op. 81 Chrissta Ludwig Otto Klamperer the philharmonic orchestra and Chorus, great compositions/performances


Johannes Brahms – Alto Rhapsody, Op. 53 & Tragic Overture, Op. 81

Clara Schumann: Piano Concerto Op. 7 – Francesco Nicolosi


Clara Schumann: Piano Concerto Op. 7 – Francesco Nicolosi

Sibelius, Symphonie Nr 7 C Dur op 105 Leonard Bernstein, Wiener Philharmoniker: great compositions/performances


Sibelius, Symphonie Nr 7 C Dur op 105 Leonard Bernstein, Wiener Philharmoniker

Mozart Quartet No 16 K 428 Hagen Quartet: great compositions/performances


Mozart Quartet No 16 K 428 Hagen Quartet

Mozart – Violin Sonata No. 35 in A major, K. 526: make music part of your life series



From:

MozartViolin Sonata No. 35 in A major, K. 526

I. Molto allegro [0:00]
II. Andante [9:30]
III. Presto [19:50]

Sigiswald Kuijken, violin
Luc Devos, fortepiano

performed on period instruments

Painting of Mozart by Barbara Krafft

Gustavo Dudamel Johannes Brahms variations sur un thème de Joseph Haydn en si Majeur opus 56a: great compositions/performances


Gustavo Dudamel Johannes Brahms variations sur un thème de Joseph Haydn en si Majeur opus 56a

FROM:

Maxime Brisole

From Wikipedia

Les Variations sur un thème de Haydn, op. 56 (allemand : Variationen über ein Thema von Haydn) est une œuvre orchestrale en variations de Johannes Brahms, composée pendant l’été 1873. Cette œuvre est constituée d’un thème en si bémol majeur, de huit variations et d’un finale.

Le thème est extrait du choral Saint-Antoine de la Feldpartie en si bémol majeur, Hob. II/46 de Joseph Haydn. Brahms a écrit huit variations sur ce thème, plus un final. Le finale est une passacaille magnifique, dont le point culminant, une reformulation du choral, est un moment d’une grande transcendance, au point que Brahms, habituellement austère, se permet l’utilisation d’un triangle.

Deux versions existent : une version pour deux pianos, celle que Brahms a écrite en premier (mais désignée Op. 56b), et une version pour orchestre, dénommée op. 56a.

Cette dernière version est considérée comme « la première série de variations indépendantes pour orchestre dans l’histoire de la musique »1. L’orchestre contient un piccolo, deux flûtes deux hautbois, deux clarinettes, deux bassons, un contrebasson, quatre cors (2 en mi bémol, 2 en si bémol), 2 trompettes, des timbales, un triangle ainsi que la composition habituelle des cordes (premiers et seconds violons, altos, violoncelles et contrebasses).

Les Variations sur un thème de Haydn, op. 56 (allemand : Variationen über ein Thema von Haydn) est une œuvre orchestrale en variations de Johannes Brahms, composée pendant l’été 1873. Cette œuvre est constituée d’un thème en si bémol majeur, de huit variations et d’un finale.

Le thème est extrait du choral Saint-Antoine de la Feldpartie en si bémol majeur, Hob. II/46 de Joseph Haydn. Brahms a écrit huit variations sur ce thème, plus un final. Le finale est une passacaille magnifique, dont le point culminant, une reformulation du choral, est un moment d’une grande transcendance, au point que Brahms, habituellement austère, se permet l’utilisation d’un triangle.

Deux versions existent : une version pour deux pianos, celle que Brahms a écrite en premier (mais désignée Op. 56b), et une version pour orchestre, dénommée op. 56a.

Cette dernière version est considérée comme « la première série de variations indépendantes pour orchestre dans l’histoire de la musique »1. L’orchestre contient un piccolo, deux flûtes deux hautbois, deux clarinettes, deux bassons, un contrebasson, quatre cors (2 en mi bémol, 2 en si bémol), 2 trompettes, des timbales, un triangle ainsi que la composition habituelle des cordes (premiers et seconds violons, altos, violoncelles et contrebasses).

 

make music part of your life series: Mozart – Missa Brevis in C, K. 259 [complete] (Organ Solo Mass)


[youtube.com/watch?v=Sxl-puuO7QA]

Mozart – Missa Brevis in C, K. 259 [complete] (Organ Solo Mass)

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791).
Composed December 1775/1776 in Salzburg.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Missa Brevis No. 8 in C major, K. 259, is a mass composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, probably in 1776.[1] It is scored for SATB soloists, SATB choir, violin I and II, 2 oboes, 2 clarini (high trumpets), 3 trombones colla parte, timpani and basso continuo.

Although classed as a missa brevis (brief mass), the inclusion of trumpets in the scoring makes it a missa brevis et solemnis.[1][2] The mass derives its nickname Orgelmesse or Orgelsolomesse (Organ Solo Mass) from the obbligato organ solo entry of the Benedictus.[1][3] This is one of three masses Mozart composed in November and December 1776, all set in C major, including the Credo Mass (K. 257) and the Piccolominimesse (K. 258).[4]

The work consists of six movements. Performances require approximately 10–15 minutes.

  1. “Kyrie” Andante, C major, common time
  2. “Gloria” Allegro, C major, 3/4
  3. “Credo” Allegro, C major, common time
  4. Sanctus” Adagio maestoso, C major, 3/4
    “Pleni sunt coeli et terra…” Allegro, C major, cut common time
  5. “Benedictus” Allegro vivace, G major, 3/4
    “Hosanna in excelsis…” Allegro, C major, 3/4
  6. Agnus Dei” Adagio, C major, common time
    Dona nobis pacem…” Allegro, C major, 3/4

FREE .mp3 and .wav files of all Mozart’s music at: http://www.mozart-archiv.de/
FREE sheet music scores of any Mozart piece at: http://dme.mozarteum.at/DME/nma/start…
ALSO check out these cool sites: http://musopen.org/
and http://imslp.org/wiki

make music part of your life series: Mozart – Violin Sonata No. 27 in G, K. 379


[youtube.com/watch?v=qWsJgmPBEyU]

Mozart – Violin Sonata No. 27

in G, K. 379

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791).
Composed April 1781, in Vienna.
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FREE .mp3 and .wav files of all Mozart’s music at: http://www.mozart-archiv.de/
FREE sheet music scores of any Mozart piece at: http://dme.mozarteum.at/DME/nma/start…
ALSO check out these cool sites: http://musopen.org/
and http://imslp.org/wiki/
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“Serenade” from Make Music Part of Your Life: String Quartert Op.3 No.5 by Haydn. Andante Cantabile in C Major


[youtube.com/watch?v=k4g0FqfKxZY]

Serenade” from String Quartert Op.3 No.5 by Haydn. Andante Cantabile in C Major

David Bousso Conducts the Union City Philharmonic Strings

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Mozart: Overture – ‘Lucio Silla’


[youtube.com/watch?v=1sukIWVPRa8]

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (German: [ˈvɔlfɡaŋ amaˈdeus ˈmoːtsaʁt], English see fn.), name Johannes Chrysostomus Wolfgangus Theophilus Mozart (27 January 1756 — 5 December 1791), was a prolific and influential composer of the Classical era. Mozart showed prodigious ability from his earliest childhood. Already competent on keyboard and violin, he composed from the age of five and performed before European royalty. At 17, he was engaged as a court musician in Salzburg, but grew restless and travelled in search of a better position, always composing abundantly. While visiting Vienna in 1781, he was dismissed from his Salzburg position. He chose to stay in the capital, where he achieved fame but little financial security. During his final years in Vienna, he composed many of his best-known symphonies, concertos, and operas, and portions of the Requiem, which was largely unfinished at the time of his death. The circumstances of his early death have been much mythologized. He was survived by his wife Constanze and two sons. Mozart learned voraciously from others, and developed a brilliance and maturity of style that encompassed the light and graceful along with the dark and passionate. He composed over 600 works, many acknowledged as pinnacles of symphonic, concertante, chamber, operatic, and choral music. He is among the most enduringly popular of classical composers, and his influence on subsequent Western art music is profound; Beethoven composed his own early works in the shadow of Mozart, and Joseph Haydn wrote that “posterity will not see such a talent again in 100 years…http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wolfgang…

Lucio Silla (pronounced /ˈluːtʃoʊ ˈsɪlɒ/, Italian pronunciation: [ˈluːtʃo ˈsiːlla]), K. 135, is an Italian opera in three acts composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. The libretto was written by Giovanni de Gamerra. It was first performed on 26 December 1772 at the Teatro Regio Ducal in Milan and was regarded as “a moderate success”. Handel’s opera Silla (1713) covered the same subject…http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucio_Silla


A link to this wonderful artists Website:http://www.classicalarchives.com/moza…

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart – Violin Sonata No. 22, K. 305


[youtube.com/watch?v=XEkIwkg_HoY]
Violin Sonata No. 22 in A major, K. 305 (293d) is a work composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart in Mannheim 1778. There are two movements:
0:00 1. Allegro di molto
4:53 2. Tema. Andante grazioso – Variations I-V – Variation VI. Allegro
The first movement is in sonata form. This movement has one of the bounciest happiest melodies to be found in his violin sonatas. The second movement is in a theme and variations form. This movement is more somber than the opening movement, being at a slower tempo and having a more subdued melody.

 

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Mozart – Violin Sonata No. 27 in G, K. 379



Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791).
Composed April 1781, in Vienna.
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FREE .mp3 and .wav files of all Mozart’s music at: http://www.mozart-archiv.de/
FREE sheet music scores of any Mozart piece at:http://dme.mozarteum.at/DME/nma/start…
ALSO check out these cool sites: http://musopen.org/
and http://imslp.org/wiki/

Buy “Mozart: 2g. Tema – 2g. Tema” on

Google PlayiTunesAmazon MP3 

Artist
Arthur Grumiaux

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life: Haydn Symphony No. 48 “Maria Theresia”


Franz Joseph Haydn (1732 – 1809)
Symphony No. 48Maria Theresia
Austro – Hungarian Haydn Orchestra
Adam Fischer
Recording : 1995, Haydnsaal, Esterházy Palace, Eisenstadt, Austria

Buy “Symphony No. 48 In C Major Maria Theresia: Menuet & Trio: Allegretto” on

Google PlayiTuneseMusicAmazonMP3

  • Artist
    Austro-Hungarian Haydn Orchestra
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Great Composition/Performances: Beethoven Symphony No.1 in C major, Op.21 / Roger Norrington The London Classical Players



Great Composition/Performances:   Beethoven Symphony No.1 in C major, Op.21 / Roger Norrington The London Classical Players

Ludwig van Beethoven (1770 † 1827) 

Work: Symphony No.1 in C major, Op.21 

01. Adagio molto – Allegro con brio
02. Andante cantabile con moto
03. Menuetto – Allegro molto e vivace
04. Adagio – Allegro molto e vivace

Dedication to Baron Gottfried van Swieten
Premiered on April 2, 1800 at the K.K. Hoftheater nächst der Burg in Vienna

Scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in C, 2 bassoons, 2 horns in C and F, 2 trumpets in C, timpani and strings.

Conductor: Roger Norrington
The London Classical Players

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia 

Ludwig van Beethoven‘s Symphony No. 1 in C major, Op. 21, was dedicated to Baron Gottfried van Swieten, an early patron of the composer. The piece was published in 1801 by Hoffmeister & Kühnel of Leipzig. It is unknown exactly when Beethoven finished writing this work, but sketches of the finale were found from 1795.[1]
Historical background

Portrait of Beethoven in 1803, three years after the premiere of his 1st Symphony.

The symphony is clearly indebted to Beethoven’s predecessors, particularly his teacher Joseph Haydn as well as Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, but nonetheless has characteristics that mark it uniquely as Beethoven’s work, notably the frequent use of sforzandi and the prominent, more independent use of wind instruments. Sketches for the finale are found among the exercises Beethoven wrote while studying counterpoint underJohann Georg Albrechtsberger in the spring of 1797.

The premiere took place on 2 April 1800 at the K.K. Hoftheater nächst der Burg in Vienna. The concert program also included his Septet and Piano Concerto No. 2, as well as a symphony by Mozart, and an aria and a duet from Haydn’s oratorio The Creation. This concert effectively served to announce Beethoven’s talents to Vienna.[2]

Instrumentation
The symphony is scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in C, 2 bassoons, 2 horns in C and F, 2 trumpets in C, timpani and strings.

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Great Composers/Performances: Nathaniel Mayfield plays Michael Haydn’s, Concerto in D for Baroque Trumpet



Michael Haydn‘s Concerto in D Major for Baroque Trumpet. Performed live in Concert by Nathaniel Mayfield in Montreal, Canada on Feb. 18, 2009
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Michael Haydn

Johann Michael Haydn (German: [ˈhaɪdən] ( listen); 14 September 1737 – 10 August 1806) was an Austriancomposer of the Classical period, the younger brother of Joseph Haydn.

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Great Performances: Wynton Marsalis: Joseph Haydn – Trumpet Concerto in E flat major



From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Joseph Haydn‘s Concerto per il Clarino, (Hob.: VIIe/1) (Trumpet Concerto in E flat major) was written in 1796 for his long-time friend Anton Weidinger. Joseph Haydn was 64 years of age.

Form

The work is composed in three movements (typical of a Classical period concerto), they are marked as followed:

  • I. Allegro (sonata)
  • II. Andante (sonata)
  • III. Allegro (rondo)

In addition to the solo trumpet, the concerto is scored for an orchestra consisting of strings, 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 bassoons, 2 horns, 2 (presumably natural) trumpets (which generally play in support of the horns or timpani rather than the solo trumpet), and timpani.

Original instrument

Anton Weidinger developed a keyed trumpet which could play chromatically throughout its entire range. Before this, the trumpet was valveless and could only play a limited range of harmonic notes by altering the vibration of the lips; also called by the name of natural trumpet. Most of these harmonic notes were clustered in the higher registers, so previous trumpet concertos could only play melodically with the high register only (e.g., Bach’s Brandenburg Concerto No. 2). Haydn’s concerto includes melodies in the middle and lower register, exploiting the capabilities of the new instrument.

There were attempts all over Europe around the mid-classical era to expand the range of the trumpet using valves, but Weidinger’s idea of drilling holes and covering them with flute-like keys was not a success as it had very poor sound quality. Thus the natural trumpet still had continual use in the classical orchestra while the keyed trumpet had barely any repertoire. The valved trumpets used today was first constructed and used in the 1830s.

 

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Great Composers/Compositions: Igor Bukhvalov – Symphony no. 8 in F-Dur, Op. 93 by Ludwig van Beethoven



Igor Bukhvalov conducts Belarusian National Philharmonic performing Symphony #8 in F-Dur ,Op. 93 By Ludwig van Beethoven:

The Eighth Symphony consists of four movements:

 

  1. Allegro vivace e con brio
  2. Allegretto scherzando
  3. Tempo di Menuetto
  4. Allegro vivace
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 The Symphony No. 8 in F MajorOp. 93 is a symphony in four movements composed by Ludwig van Beethoven in 1812. Beethoven fondly referred to it as “my little Symphony in F,” distinguishing it from his Sixth Symphony, a longer work also in F.[1]

The Eighth Symphony is generally light-hearted, though not lightweight, and in many places cheerfully loud, with many accented notes. Various passages in the symphony are heard by some listeners to be musical jokes.[2] As with various other Beethoven works such as the Opus 27 piano sonatas, the symphony deviates from Classical tradition in making the last movement the weightiest of the four.
The work was begun in the summer of 1812, immediately after the completion of the Seventh Symphony.[3]At the time Beethoven was 41 years old. As Antony Hopkins has noted, the cheerful mood of the work betrays nothing of the grossly unpleasant events that were taking place in Beethoven’s life at the time, which involved his interference in his brother Johann’s love life.[4] The work took Beethoven only four months to complete,[3] and is, unlike many of his works, without dedication.
The premiere took place on 24 February 1814, at a concert in the RedoutensaalVienna, at which theSeventh Symphony (which had been premiered two months earlier) was also played.[5] Beethoven was growing increasingly deaf at the time, but nevertheless led the premiere. Reportedly, “the orchestra largely ignored his ungainly gestures and followed the principal violinist instead.”[6]

 

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FABULOUS COMPOSERS/COMPOSITIONS: Beethoven – Missa Solemnis – Philharmonia / Karajan



Ludwig van Beethoven

Missa Solemnis op.123

Kyrie 0:00
Gloria 11:12
Credo 28:33
Sanctus 50:54
Agnus Dei 01:07:59

Elisabeth Schwarzkopf
Christa Ludwig
Nicolai Gedda
Nicola Zaccaria
Singverein des Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde in Wien
Philharmonia Orchestra
Herbert von Karajan

Studio recording (11-15.IX.1958)

 Donald Tovey has connected Beethoven to the earlier tradition in a different way:

Not even Bach or Handel can show a greater sense of space and of sonority. There is no earlier choral writing that comes so near to recovering some of the lost secrets of the style of Palestrina. There is no choral and no orchestral writing, earlier or later, that shows a more thrilling sense of the individual colour of every chord, every position, and every doubled third or discord.
 

In this famous portrait of Beethoven byJoseph Karl Stieler, Beethoven can be seen working on the Missa solemnis in D major.

The Missa solemnis in D major, Op. 123 was composed by Ludwig van Beethoven from 1819 to 1823. It was first performed on 7 April 1824 in St. PetersburgRussia, under the auspices of Beethoven’s patron Prince Nikolai Galitzin; an incomplete performance was given in Vienna on 7 May 1824, when the Kyrie, Credo, and Agnus Dei were conducted by the composer.[1] It is generally considered to be one of the composer’s supreme achievements. Together with Bach’s Mass in B minor, it is the most significantMass setting of the common practice period.

Despite critical recognition as one of Beethoven’s great works from the height of his composing career,Missa solemnis has not achieved the same level of popular attention that many of his symphonies and sonatas have enjoyed.[citation needed] Written around the same time as his Ninth Symphony, it is Beethoven’s second setting of the Mass, after his Mass in C, Op. 86.

The Mass is scored for 2 flutes; 2 oboes, 2 clarinets (in A, C, and B♭); 2 bassoonscontrabassoon; 4horns (in D, E♭, B♭ basso, E, and G); 2 trumpets (D, B♭, and C); alto, tenor, and bass trombonetimpani;organ continuo; strings (violins I and II, violascellos, and basses); sopranoaltotenor, and bass soloists; and mixed choir.

Like most Masses, Beethoven’s Missa solemnis is in five movements:

  • Kyrie: Perhaps the most traditional of the Mass movements, the Kyrie is in a traditional ABA’ structure, with stately choral writing in the first movement section and more contrapuntal voice leading in the Christe, which also introduces the four vocal soloists.
  • Gloria: Quickly shifting textures and themes highlight each portion of the Gloria text, in a beginning to the movement that is almost encyclopedic in its exploration of 3/4 time. The movement ends with the first of the work’s two massive fugues, on the text “In gloria Dei patris. Amen”, leading into a recapitulation of the initial Gloria text and music.
  • Credo: One of the most remarkable movements to come from Beethoven’s pen opens with a chord sequence that will be used again in the movement to effect modulations. The Credo, like the Gloria, is an often disorienting, mad rush through the text. The poignant modal harmonies for the “et incarnatus” yield to ever more expressive heights through the “crucifixus”, and into a remarkable, a cappella setting of the “et resurrexit”that is over almost before it has begun. Most notable about the movement, though, is the closing fugue on “et vitam venturi” that includes one of the most difficult passages in the choral repertoire, when the subject returns at doubled tempo for a thrilling conclusion.
    The form of the Credo is divided into four parts: (I) allegro ma non troppo through “descendit de coelis” in B-flat; (II) “Incarnatus est” through”Resurrexit” in D; (III) “Et ascendit” through the Credo recapitulation in F; (IV) Fugue and Coda “et vitam venturi saeculi, amen” in B-flat.
  • Sanctus: Up until the benedictus of the Sanctus, the Missa solemnis is of fairly normal classical proportions. But then, after an orchestral preludio, a solo violin enters in its highest range — representing the Holy Spirit descending to earth — and begins the Missa’s most transcendently beautiful music, in a remarkably long extension of the text.
  • Agnus Dei: A setting of the plea “miserere nobis” (“have mercy on us”) that begins with the men’s voices alone in B minor yields, eventually, to a bright D-major prayer “dona nobis pacem” (“grant us peace”) in a pastoral mode. After some fugal development, it is suddenly and dramatically interrupted by martial sounds (a convention in the 18th century, as in Haydn‘s Missa in tempore belli), but after repeated pleas of “miserere!”,eventually recovers and brings itself to a stately conclusion.

 

C. Saint – Saens Morceau de concert op. 94 | Peter Müseler, Horn



Conducted by Juri Lebedev | Summer Concert 2007 at Belvedere School of Music Weimar/Germany | Musikgymnasium Schloß Belvedere

 

FABULOUS COMPOSERS/COMPOSITIOINS: Johann Nepomuk Hummel: Piano Concerto No. 3 in B minor, Op 89



Johann Nepomuk Hummel (1778-1837)

Piano Concerto No. 3 in B minor, Op. 89

I. Allegro moderato
II. Larghetto 16:55
III. Finale: Vivace 24:48

Stephen Hough, piano
English Chamber Orchestra
Bryden Thomson, conductor

Johann Nepomuk Hummel (November 14, 1778 — October 17, 1837) was an Austrian composer and virtuoso pianist. His music reflects the transition from the Classical to the Romantic musical era.

Hummel was born in Pressburg, Kingdom of Hungary, then a part of the Austrian Habsburg Monarchy (now Bratislava in Slovakia). His father, Johannes Hummel, was the director of the Imperial School of Military Music in Vienna and the conductor there of Emanuel Schikaneder’s theatre orchestra at the Theater auf der Wieden; his mother, Margarethe Sommer Hummel, was the widow of the wigmaker Josef Ludwig. He was named after St John of Nepomuk. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart offered the boy music lessons at the age of eight after being impressed with his ability. Hummel was taught and housed by Mozart for two years free of charge and made his first concert appearance at the age of nine at one of Mozart’s concerts. Continue reading

J. Haydn – Symphony No. 6 in D major ‘La Matin’



Composer: Joseph Haydn (1732 – 1809).
Symphony No. 6 in D major Hob I/6 (1762):

1. Adagio-Allegro: 0:00
2. Adagio-Andante-Adagio: 5:46
3. Menuet & Trio: 13:38
4. Finale, Allegro: 18:10

By The Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra.

 

Sergei Prokofiev – Symphony No. 1 in D major “Classical”, Op. 25



Sergei Prokofiev began work on his Symphony No. 1 in D major (Op. 25) in 1916, but wrote most of it in 1917, finishing work on September 10. It is written in loose imitation of the style of Haydn (and to a lesser extent, Mozart), and is widely known as the Classical Symphony, a name given to it by the composer. It premiered on April 21, 1918 in Petrograd, conducted by Prokofiev himself, and has become one of his most popular and beloved works.

The symphony can be considered to be one of the first neoclassical compositions. However, although it was composed in an attempt to emulate the style of Joseph Haydn, it does not do so strictly, and strongly reflects modern compositional practices and Prokofiev’s own voice. The work was partly inspired by his conducting studies at the Saint Petersburg Conservatory‎, where the instructor, Nikolai Tcherepnin, taught his students about conducting Haydn, among other composers.

The symphony is in four movements:

– Allegro 0:00
Larghetto 3:50
– Gavotta: Non troppo allegro 7:45
– Finale: Molto vivace 9:22

Conductor: Kurt Masur
Orchestra: Dresdner Philharmonie

 

Beethoven- Piano Sonata No. 9 in E major, Op. 14 No. 1 Piano – Richard Goode



00:00 – Allegro
06:40 – Allegretto 
10:25 – Rondo – Allegro comodo

Richard Goode, 1993

 

Sviatoslav Richter – Haydn – Piano Sonata No 32 in B minor, Hob XVI-32


 

 

Joseph Haydn – Symphony No. 48 in C major “Maria Theresia”



Joseph Haydn
(1732-1809)

Symphony No. 48 “Maria Theresia”
in C major / C-Dur / en ut majeur
(1769)

Austro-Hungarian Haydn Orchestra, Adam Fischer

Joseph Haydn / Symphony No. 49 in F minor “La passione” (Solomons)



Franz Joseph Haydn (1732-1809)
Symphony No. 49 in F minor “La passione”, Hob. I:49 (1768)

English: House of Joseph Haydn in Vienna, now ...

English: House of Joseph Haydn in Vienna, now a Haydn museum. Español: La casa donde vivió Joseph Haydn durante sus últimos años en Viena fue convertida en museo. ATWien1060 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

00:00 – Adagio
10:25 – Allegro di molto
17:04 – Menuet & Trio
22:59 – Finale. Presto

L’Estro Armonico, dir. Derek Solomons (1982)

“This dark-hued, somber — even tragic — Symphony, in the unusual key of F minor, stands in the center of the ‘Sturm und Drang‘ movement.
It is also Haydn’s last symphony in the sonata da chiesa form, and unquestionably the greatest.

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Luigi Cherubini (1760-1842) Chant sur la mort de Joseph Haydn (1/2) — (play the second part from the playlist)


Uploaded on Mar 31, 2011

00:00 – I. Introduction
08:42 – II. Recitativo Amans des nobles Soeurs

Marilyn Schmiege, soprano
Martyn Hill & Paolo Barbacini, tenore
Cappella Coloniensis
Gabriele Ferro, conductor

J.Haydn – Cello Concerto No.1 in C major – M. Rostropovich and Academy of Saint Martin in the Fields


 

 


Mstislav Leopoldovich Rostropovich, KBE (Russian: Мстисла́в Леопо́льдович Ростропо́вич, Mstislav Leopol’dovič Rostropovič, pronounced [rəstrɐˈpɔvʲɪtɕ]; March 27, 1927 – April 27, 2007), known to close friends as Slava, was a Soviet and Russian cellist and conductor. He was married to the soprano Galina Vishnevskaya. He is widely considered to have been the greatest cellist of the second half of the 20th century, and one of the greatest of all time. In addition to his outstanding interpretations and technique, he was well-known for his commissions of new works which enlarged the cello repertoire more than any cellist before or since. He gave the premieres of over 100 pieces.[1]

Rostropovich was internationally recognized as a staunch advocate of human rights, and was awarded the 1974 Award of the International League of Human Rights.
(Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mstislav_Rostropovich

The Cello Concerto No. 1 in C Major, Hob. VIIb/1, by Joseph Haydn was composed around 17611765 for longtime friend Joseph Franz Weigl, then the principal cellist of Prince Nicolaus‘s Esterházy Orchestra.

The work was presumed lost until 1961, when musicologist Oldřich Pulkert discovered a copy of the score at the Prague National Museum. Though some doubts have been raised about the authenticity of the work, most experts believe that Haydn did compose this concerto.
(source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cello_Concerto_No._1_in_C_(Haydn)

Today’s Birthday: Joseph Haydn (1732)



Joseph Haydn (1732)

The principal shaper of the Classical style, Haydn was an Austrian composer who exerted major influence on his contemporaries, including Mozart, and future composers. The first great symphonist, he composed 106 symphonies and virtually invented the string quartet. By his later years, he was recognized internationally as the greatest living composer. He composed important works in almost every genre. As a teacher, Haydn had a difficult relationship with what famous student? More… Discuss