Tag Archives: Joseph Joachim

Hilary Hahn plays Johannes Brahms Violin Concerto in D Op 77


Hilary Hahn plays Johannes Brahms Violin Concerto in D Op 77

Max Bruch: Violin Concerto no. 1 in G minor, op. 26 – Akiko Suwanai (諏訪内 晶子), great compositions/performances ( 偉大な組成物/公演)


Max Bruch: Violin Concerto no. 1 in G minor, op. 26 – Akiko Suwanai (諏訪内 晶子)

Movements:

  1. Vorspiel: Allegro moderato

  2. Adagio

  3. Finale: Allegro energico

Antonín Dvořák – String Quartet in E flat major, Op. 51 ‘Slawisches’ |great compositions/performances


Antonín DvořákString Quartet in E flat major, Op. 51 ‘Slawisches’

Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Ruggiero RICCI – LALO Violin Concerto Op.20 – L.de Froment, 1977



Edouard LALO: Violin Concerto in F major Op.20 (1873)
0:13 / I. Andante – Allegro [13’29”]
13:42 / II. Andantino [4’34”]
18:16 / III. Allegro con fuoco [6’06”]
Ruggiero Ricci, violin – Orchestra of Radio Luxembourg – Louis de Froment, conductor (Recorded: June, July 1977 – VOX)

 

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Antonin Dvorak – Slavonic Dance No. 10 in E minor, Op. 72, No. 2


 

Fabulous Performers: Roggiero Ricci plays Antonín Dvořák’s – Violin Concerto in A minor, Op. 53, B. 108



Ruggiero Ricci, violin. Saint Louis Symphony Orchestra, Walter Susskind (1977)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia 

Violin Concerto in A minor, Op. 53 (B.108) is a concerto for violin and orchestra composed by Antonín Dvořák in 1879. The concerto was premiered in 1883 by František Ondříček in Prague. He also gave the premieres in Vienna and London. Today it remains an important work in the violin repertoire.

The concerto’s structure is the classical three movements of fast-slow-fast.

  1. Allegro ma non troppo
  2. Adagio ma non troppo
  3. Finale: Allegro giocoso ma non troppo

Antonín Dvořák was inspired to write his concerto after having met Joseph Joachim in 1878 and composed the work with the intention of dedicating it him. However, when he finished the concerto in 1879, Joachim became skeptical about it. Joachim was a strict classicist and objected to Dvořák’sinter alia, or his abrupt truncation of the first movement’s orchestral tutti. Joachim also didn’t like the fact that the recapitulation was cut short and that it led directly to the slow second movement. It is also assumed that he was upset with the persistent repetition found in the third movement. However, Joachim never said anything outright and instead claimed to be editing the solo part. He never actually performed the piece.

Notable recordings of the concerto include:

 

 

Leonid Kogan plays Brahms Hungarian Dance, no.1



Leonid Kogan (1924-1982), the great Russian violinist.

Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
Hungarian Dance (trans. Joseph Joachim)
no.1 in G minor

Andrei Mytnik, piano
Recorded in 1951-1955

 

Max Bruch – Violin Concerto No.1 G minor Op.26 (Menuhin, 1961)


 

  1. VorspielAllegro moderato
  2. Adagio
  3. Finale: Allegro energico

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 Max Bruch‘s Violin Concerto No. 1 in G minor, Op. 26, is one of the most popular violin concertos in the repertory. It continues to be performed and recorded by many violinists and is arguably Bruch’s most famous composition.[1]
History

The concerto was first completed in 1866 and the first performance was given on 24 April 1866 by Otto von Königslow with Bruch himself conducting. The concerto was then considerably revised with help from celebrated violinist Joseph Joachim and completed in its present form in 1867. The premiere of the revised concerto was given by Joachim in Bremen on 5 January 1868 with Karl Martin Rheinthaler conducting.[2]       More…

 

Violin Concerto in A minor Opus 53 (III Giocoso Ma Non Troppo) by Antonin Dvorak- David Oistrach


Violin Concerto in A minor, Op. 53 (B.108) is a concerto for violin and orchestra composed by Antonín Dvořák in 1879. The concerto was premiered in 1883 by František Ondříček in Prague. He also gave the premieres in Vienna and London. Today it remains an important work in the violin repertoire.

The concerto’s structure is the classical three movements of fast-slow-fast.

  1. Allegro ma non troppo
  2. Adagio ma non troppo
  3. Finale: Allegro giocoso ma non troppo

Antonín Dvořák was inspired to write his concerto after having met Joseph Joachim in 1878 and composed the work with the intention of dedicating it him. However, when he finished the concerto in 1879, Joachim became skeptical about it. Joachim was a strict classicist and objected to Dvořák’s inter alia, or his abrupt truncation of the first movement’s orchestral tutti. Joachim also didn’t like the fact that the recapitulation was cut short and that it led directly to the slow second movement. It is also assumed that he was upset with the persistent repetition found in the third movement. However, Joachim never said anything outright and instead claimed to be editing the solo part. He never actually performed the piece.

(Sourse: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Violin_Concerto_(Dvo%C5%99%C3%A1k)