Tag Archives:  Jr.

Saint of the Day for Saturday, June 6th, 2015: St. Norbert


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this day in the yesteryear: First Drive-In Theater Opens in New Jersey (1933)


First Drive-In Theater Opens in New Jersey (1933)

The drive-in theater was the creation of New Jersey chemical company magnate Richard M. Hollingshead, Jr. In 1932, Hollingshead nailed a screen to trees in his backyard and set a projector on the hood of his car. After applying for a patent for his creation, Hollingshead opened the first drive-in the next year. Though it only operated for three years, the concept soon caught on in other states. How many drive-ins are estimated to have existed in the US at the height of their popularity? More… Discuss

today’s picture: Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.



Civil rights leader the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., was fatally shot as he stood outside the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tenn., on April 4, 1968. The 39-year-old minister, known for preaching nonviolence in the crusade for civil rights, was in Memphis in support of striking city sanitation workers. Escaped convict James Earl Ray was convicted of King’s murder but later recanted his confession. In spite of lingering controversy surrounding his guilt, Ray served a life sentence for the crime until his death in 1998.

US President Ronald Reagan Is Shot (1981)


US President Ronald Reagan Is Shot (1981)

Just 69 days into his presidency, Ronald Reagan was shot in Washington, DC, along with three others. The would-be assassin, John Hinckley, Jr., was motivated by an obsession with actress Jodie Foster and the film Taxi Driver. Reagan soon recovered, and Hinckley was found not guilty by reason of insanity and confined to a psychiatric facility. While Reagan was hospitalized, Secretary of State Alexander Haig made a controversial statement about presidential succession. What did he say? More… Discuss

today’s Image: The Great Migration – Library of Congress



The Great Migration

From 1910 to 1970, more than 6 million southern blacks left their rural homes in search of an urban ‘Promised Land’ in the north. The largest migration in American history was caused by the ‘push’ of hardships prevalent in the South–such as segregation, lynching and the economic hopelessness of the sharecropping system–and the ‘pull’ of opportunity in the North. Plentiful industrial jobs, although sometimes menial, often offered wages three times higher than did jobs in the South. Glowing reports from friends and family already in the North inspired increased migration. While racism, housing shortages and crime often greeted the new arrivals, they also found organizations such as the National Urban League and National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) dedicated to improving the lives of black Americans.

Library of Congress

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.WpJXk4hf.dpuf

Peter, Paul, and Mary – This Land is Your Land

Tuesday: Did you know?


Did you know?

Tuesday

today’s holiday: Mozart Week (Mozartwoche) (2015)


Mozart Week (Mozartwoche) (2015)

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was born on January 27, 1756. Every January since 1956, his birthday has been celebrated by the people of Salzburg, Austria, where he was born, with a music festival devoted entirely to his works. The festival also prides itself on presenting many of his lesser known works, which are seldom performed elsewhere. Concerts are given in a number of sites associated with Mozart’s life, including the Mozarteum Building, St. Peter’s Church, the Salzburg Cathedral, and even Mozart’s home. More… Discuss

Martin Luther King, Jr.: (Image: National Archives)



Martin Luther King, Jr.
Martin Luther King, Jr., eloquent African-American Baptist minister and leader of the civil rights movement from the mid-1950s, was born in Atlanta, Georgia, on January 15, 1929. Dr. King began his involvement in the civil rights movement in 1955 with his leadership of the Montgomery bus boycott, which ended segregated seating on city buses. Adopting Mohandas K. Gandhi‘s principles of nonviolence, King led demonstrations, sit-ins and boycotts in cities throughout the South to show the injustice of racist policies. He explained his belief in nonviolence in a letter written during one of his many incarcerations: ‘Nonviolent direct action seeks to create such a crisis and foster such a tension that a community which has constantly refused to negotiate is forced to confront the issue. It seeks so to dramatize the issue that it can no longer be ignored….’ King’s efforts helped to bring about the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. He was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964. Dr. King’s leadership of the civil rights movement brought many threats against his life and on April 4, 1968, he was killed by a sniper’s bullet in Memphis, Tennessee. Martin Luther King Day was established by President Ronald Reagan in 1986, for the third Monday in January.

Image: National Archives

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.ubXxEI4E.dpuf

today’s birthday: Albert Schweitzer (1875) – “The reverence for life man”


Albert Schweitzer (1875)

Schweitzer was an Alsatian theologian, musician, philosopher, and physician. Determined to become a medical missionary, he established a hospital in Gabon, Africa, in 1913 and later expanded it to include a leper colony. He was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1952 for his medical and humanitarian work and for his “reverence for life” concept of universal ethics, which emphasizes respect for the lives of all beings. An organist to boot, he interpreted the music of what composer? More… Discuss

Today In History: What Happened This Day In History


Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

Today in History
January 7

1327   King Edward II of England is deposed.
1558   The French, under the Duke of Guise, finally take the port of Calais from the English.
1785   Frenchman Jean-Pierre Blanchard and American Dr. John Jeffries make the first crossing of the English Channel in a hydrogen balloon.
1807   Responding to Napoleon Bonaparte’s attempted blockade of the British Isles, the British blockade Continental Europe.
1865   Cheyenne and Sioux warriors attack Julesburg, Colo., in retaliation for the Sand Creek Massacre.
1901   New York stock exchange trading exceeds two million shares for the first time in history.
1902   Imperial Court of China returns to Peking. The Empress Dowager resumes her reign.
1918   The Germans move 75,000 troops from the Eastern Front to the Western Front.
1934   Six thousand pastors in Berlin defy the Nazis insisting that they will not be silenced.
1944   The U.S. Air Force announces the production of the first jet-fighter, Bell P-59 Airacomet.
1945   U.S. air ace Major Thomas B. McGuire, Jr. is killed in the Pacific.
1952   French forces in Indochina launch Operation Violette in an effort to push Viet Minh forces away from the town of Ba Vi.
1955   Marian Anderson becomes the first African American to sing at the Metropolitan Opera House.
1975   Vietnamese troops take Phuoc Binh in new full-scale offensive.
1979   Pol Pot and his Khmer Rouge are overthrown when Vietnamese troops seize the Cambodian capital of Phnom Penh.
1980   US President Jimmy Carter signs legislation providing $1.5 billion in loans to salvage Chrysler Corporation.
1985   Vietnam seizes the Khmer National Liberation Front headquarters near the Thai border.
1985   Japan launches its first interplanetary spacecraft, Sakigake, the first deep space probe launched by any nation other than the US or the USSR.
1989   Prince Akihito sworn in as Emperor of Japan, following the death of his father, Hirohito.
1990   Safety concerns over structural problems force the Leaning Tower of Pisa to be closed to the public.
1993   The Bosnian Army carries out a surprise attack on the village of Kravica in Srebrenica during the Bosnian War.
1999   The impeachment trial of US President Bill Clinton opens in the US Senate.
Born on January 7
1718   Israel Putnam, American Revolutionary War hero.
1745   Etienne Montgolfier, French inventor who, with his brother, launched the first successful hot-air balloon.
1800   Millard Fillmore, 13th President of the United States.
1845   Louis III, last King of Bavaria.
1911   Butterfly McQueen (Thelma McQueen), actress best known for her role as Scarlett O’Hara’s maid Prissy in Gone with the Wind (1939); won Daytime Emmy portraying Aunt Thelma, a fairy godmother in “The Seven Wishes of Joanna Peabody,” an ABC Afterschool Special.
1912   Charles Addams, cartoonist, creator of the Addams Family.
1922   Jean-Pierre Rampal, flautist.
1930   Jack Greene, country singer, musician; won Country Music Association Male Vocalist of the Year, Single of the Year, Album of the Year and Song of the Year for “There Goes My Everything” (1967).
1939   Prince Michael of Greece and Denmark.
1948   Kenny Loggins, singer, songwriter; half of Loggins and Messina duo.
1957   Katie Couric, journalist, author; has hosted news and talk shows on all three major TV networks.

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/today-in-history#sthash.bInOmWCg.dpuf

this day in the yesteryear: The “Trial of the Century” Begins (1935)


The “Trial of the Century” Begins (1935)

Bruno Hauptmann, a German immigrant to the US, was convicted and sentenced to death for the kidnapping and murder of Charles Augustus Lindbergh, Jr., the young son of famed pilot Charles Lindbergh. Hauptmann had been found with part of the ransom money, but the case against him has since come under scrutiny. It has been alleged that some of the evidence used to convict him was planted and that false testimony was given at the trial. What was discovered in 1985 that shed new light on the case? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Rosa Parks Refuses to Give Up Her Seat (1955)


Rosa Parks Refuses to Give Up Her Seat (1955)

Dubbed the “Mother of the Modern-Day Civil Rights Movement” by the US Congress, Rosa Parks was an African-American civil rights activist who became famous in 1955 for refusing to vacate her seat on a municipal bus for a white man. This act of civil disobedience sparked the Montgomery Bus Boycott, which launched Martin Luther King, Jr., into prominence and became one of the largest and most successful movements against racial segregation. How many thousands of commuters took part in the boycott? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Ronald DeFeo, Jr., Murders Family in Amityville, New York (1974)


Ronald DeFeo, Jr., Murders Family in Amityville, New York (1974)

After the DeFeo family was discovered murdered in their beds, Ronald DeFeo, Jr.—the family’s only surviving member—was placed under police protection. DeFeo initially told investigators that he believed the murders were a mob hit, but he soon confessed and was convicted of murdering his parents and four siblings. A number of controversies surround the case, especially regarding the possible involvement of DeFeo’s sister Dawn. What best-selling novel and series of films did these events inspire? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Texas v. Johnson Decided (1989)


Texas v. Johnson Decided (1989)

Texas v. Johnson was a decision by the Supreme Court of the United States that invalidated prohibitions on desecrating the American flag. The opinion of the court came down as a controversial 5-4 decision, with the majority opinion written by William J. Brennan, Jr. In it, the Supreme Court answered the question of whether the desecration of an American flag, by burning or otherwise, is a form of speech protected under the First Amendment. What arguments did the justices make? More… Discuss

Rockefeller Center


Rockefeller Center

Rockefeller Center is a complex of 19 buildings located in Midtown Manhattan. Philanthropist John D. Rockefeller, Jr., who sponsored the project, intended to build an opera house at the site, but that plan did not materialize. Instead, his buildings house offices, shops, restaurants, broadcasting studios, and the opulently Art-Deco Radio City Music Hall, New York City’s largest theater. Who designed the Prometheus of the central fountain, which overlooks an outdoor skating rink and mall? More… Discuss

Rockefeller Center Promenade

Rockefeller-Center-Pictures/Rockefeller-Center-Promenade (click to access more pics)

TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: CORETTA SCOTT KING (1927)


Coretta Scott King (1927)

Coretta Scott King was the wife of slain civil rights activist Martin Luther King, Jr., and a noted community leader in her own right. She was vocal in her opposition to apartheid, capital punishment, and war and advocated for women’s rights, lesbian and gay rights, and HIV/AIDS prevention. In 1968, Mrs. King established The King Center, a memorial dedicated to promoting the legacy and ideals of her late husband. Why was she under FBI surveillance from 1968 to 1972? More… Discuss

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: PAUL WARFIELD TIBBETS, JR. (1915)


Paul Warfield Tibbets, Jr. (1915)

A US Air Force colonel during World War II, Tibbets is best known for piloting the Enola Gay—named for his mother—on August 6, 1945, when it dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima. The bomb, code-named Little Boy, was the first atomic weapon deployed in the history of warfare and killed tens of thousands of people. Initially hailed as a hero in the US, Tibbets became a target of controversy in the debate over the ethics of atomic warfare. What was his stance on the bombing later in life? More… Discuss

 

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TODAY BIRTHDAY: MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. (1929)


Martin Luther King, Jr. (1929)

King was the inspirational leader of the US Civil Rights Movement. An advocate of nonviolence, he organized boycotts, marches, and demonstrations to protest segregation and racial injustice. In August 1963, he spearheaded the March on Washington, an assembly of more than 200,000 protesters at which he made his famous “I Have a Dream” speech. King’s work helped to assure the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, but he was killed just four years later in Memphis, Tennessee. Why was he there? More… Discuss

 

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: MOTOWN RECORDS FOUNDED (1959)


Motown Records Founded (1959)

Detroit songwriter Berry Gordy, Jr., founded Motown Records in 1959 with an $800 loan from his family. The label scored its first big hit with the Miracles‘ “Shop Around” in 1960, and its roster soon boasted the Temptations, the Four Tops, the Supremes, and Marvin Gaye. By creating the “Motown sound“—lyrical ballads set to an infectiously rhythmic accompaniment—it helped to make African-American music part of the popular music industry. Where does the name “Motown” come from?More… Discuss

 

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ARTICLE: THE MIRROR TEST


The Mirror Test

This test is used to determine whether an animal recognizes itself in a mirror—an indicator of self-awareness. It was developed in 1970 by psychologist Gordon Gallup, Jr., who was inspired by Darwin‘s account of an encounter with a captive orangutan that saw itself in a mirror and seemed to show recognition. Gallup refined the test by placing marks on his subjects and then observing their responses to the marks upon seeing their reflections. Which animals typically pass the test, and which fail?More… Discuss
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This Day in the Yesteryear: OIL RIG ACCIDENTALLY DRAINS LAKE PEIGNEUR (1980)


Oil Rig Accidentally Drains Lake Peigneur (1980)

When Leonce Viator, Jr., set out in his boat for a day of fishing on Louisiana‘s Lake Peigneur, he never imagined he would end up fighting for his life. But that is exactly what happened after an oil rig on the lake’s surface accidentally bored through the roof of a salt mine beneath it. Like a bathtub whose plug has been pulled, the lake began draining into the mine, creating a whirlpool that sucked in not just water but barges, trees, and acres of surrounding land. What happened to Viator?More… Discuss

 

Do you remember this tune: Oscar Brown, Jr. – Hymn to Friday



Oscar Brown,  Jr. – Hymn to Friday