Tag Archives: Julius Caesar

Saint of the Day for Thursday, June 4th, 2015: St. Francis Caracciolo


Image of St. Francis Caracciolo

St. Francis Caracciolo

Founder of the Minor Clerks Regular with St. John Augustine Adorno. He was born in 1563, a member of a noble Neapolitan family. Though he had a rare skin disease, much like leprosy, Francis became a … continue reading

More Saints of the Day

Veni Vidi Vici


Veni Vidi Vici

Before Julius Caesar was made dictator for life, he engaged in a civil war with his rival Pompey. Caesar started the war by crossing the Rubicon River into Italy, reportedly uttering the words Iacta alea est—”the die is cast.” Pompey fled and was eventually killed after Caesar pursued him to Egypt. From Egypt, Caesar went to Syria and Pontus, where in 47 BCE he defeated Pharnaces II with such ease that he reported his victory with the words Veni, vidi, vici—meaning what? More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Augustus Caesar (63 BCE)


Augustus Caesar (63 BCE)

Augustus Caesar was the first emperor of Rome. Known as Octavian for the period of his life prior to 27 BCE, he came to power after defeating Mark Antony and Cleopatra. He ended years of civil war and gave Rome an era of peace, prosperity, and imperial greatness. Although he preserved the outward form of the Roman Republic, he ruled with extraordinary powers for more than 40 years and filled the Senate with sympathizers who named him “Augustus.” What was the significance of this title? More… Discuss

euzicasa June 4 2014 – imagine what would happen if 80% of followers would show up here at the same time (HIHIHIHI)


euzicasa June 4 2014 – imagine what would happen if 80% of followers would show up at the same time (HIHIHIHI)

euzicasa June 4 2014 - imagine what would happen if 80% of followers would show up at the same time (HIHIHIHI)

euzicasa June 4 2014 – imagine what would happen if 80% of followers would show up at the same time (HIHIHIHI)

euzicasa June 4 2014 views by country -- imagine what would happen if 80% of followers would show up at the same time (HIHIHIHI)

euzicasa June 4 2014 views by country — imagine what would happen if 80% of followers would show up at the same time (HIHIHIHI)

Enhanced by Zemanta

ARTICLE: CRYPTOGRAPHY


Cryptography

Cryptography concerns the securing of information, often during communication, by translating messages into cipher or code. Ciphering has always been considered vital for diplomatic and military secrecy—the Bible is replete with examples of ciphering, and many figures throughout history have written in ciphers, including Julius Caesar, Charlemagne, Mary Queen of Scots, and Louis XIV. What legal issues and controversies surround cryptography methods in the 21st century? More…Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

Forbidden Knowledge: Castles & Fortresses (Documentary)



Forbidden Knowledge We investigate the castle that helped create Great Britain and learn why it was such an impregnable fortress. Then it’s off to discover the invisible underground defensive systems of Cappadocia and how they proved so successful they are they longest continually inhabited fortress in history. We test the ancient Mayan killer bee castle defences, and release bees in an attack. We build a replica section of the ancient Roman fort of Alesia and discover whether the great general Julius Caesar could really have built 24 miles of defences in just 6 weeks. We investigate the most impregnable walls in history – the multi-layered defences of Constantinople – and discover the type of cannon that the sultan Mehmet used to finally destroy them in the great siege of 1453. Finally, we fire one of these cannons for the first time in hundreds of years and collect invaluable ballistic data.

 

MARCUS LICINIUS CRASSUS


Marcus Licinius Crassus

Crassus was the wealthiest man in Rome when he, along with Julius Caesar and Pompey, formed the First Triumvirate in 60 BCE. The three men were able to control Rome, and though Pompey and Crassus were jealous of each other, Caesar kept the arrangement going. However, seven years later, Crassus invaded Parthia, hoping for a victory to match the successes of Pompey and Caesar. His army of about 44,000 was defeated in the desert by 10,000 Parthian archers, and he was killed while trying to do what? More… Discuss

 

TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: CHEVALIER D’ÉON (1728)


Chevalier d’Éon (1728)

The inspiration for the now-obsolete term “eonism,” describing the adoption of female dress and behavior by a male, the Chevalier d’Éon was a French noble, soldier, and spy who lived first as a male and then as a female. His cross-dressing appears to have begun as part of his covert activities, but by the 1770s, rumors reached France that the Chevalier was actually a woman masquerading as a man, and he was ordered to live as a woman thereafter. When was it proven that he was anatomically male? More… Discuss

 

Today’s Birthday: POMPEY THE GREAT (106 BCE)


Pompey the Great (106 BCE)

Pompey was a Roman general and the rival of Julius Caesar. Along with Caesar and Crassus, he was a member of the First Triumvirate established in 61 BCE. After the death of Pompey’s wife, Caesar’s daughter Julia, Pompey and Caesar became enemies. When Pompey received the sole consulship as the leader of the senatorial party, Caesar broke with the senate and crossed the Rubicon, and a civil war began. Pompey was defeated at Pharsalus and fled to Egypt, where he was assassinated while doing what? More… Discuss

 

Today’s Birthday: Julius Caesar (100 BCE)


Julius Caesar (100 BCE)

Caesar was a Roman general and statesman who formed the First Triumvirate with Pompey and Marcus Licinius Crassus and later precipitated the Roman Civil War, defeating Pompey and becoming dictator for life. His dictatorial powers, however, inspired great resentment. He was in the midst of launching a series of political and social reforms when he was assassinated on the Ides of March by conspirators led by Cassius and Brutus. Caesar’s commentaries on what wars are considered classic military documents? More… Discuss

Villa of the Papyri


Villa of the Papyri

The Villa of the Papyri, as it is now known, was a private home owned by Julius Caesar’s father-in-law in the ancient Roman city of Herculaneum. In 79 CE, the eruption of Vesuvius covered the entire city with volcanic ash, including the villa, which was situated halfway up the volcano‘s slope. Its remains were excavated in the 18th century, and therein was found a library containing 1,785 carbonized papyrus scrolls, many of them expounding the ideas of what school of philosophy? More… Discuss