Tag Archives: July

July One of Hottest Months on Record


July One of Hottest Months on Record

The eastern US and central Asia had a significantly cooler-than-average July, but they were the only two regions on Earth that did. For the globe as a whole, it was the fourth-hottest month on record—surpassed only by the Julys of 1998, 2005, and 2010—and the 353rd consecutive month with an above average global temperature. The blistering July temperatures came hot on the heels of both the hottest May and hottest June ever recorded. More… Discuss

Advertisements

today’s holiday: Reek Sunday


Reek Sunday

In County Mayo, Ireland, thousands of pilgrims climb Croagh Patrick on the last Sunday in July to pray on the spot where Ireland’s patron saint, St. Patrick, is believed to have started his ministry. Those wishing to maximize the arduousness of the journey ascend the 2,510-foot mountain, known locally as the Reek, in bare feet and at night. The traditional time to begin the ascent is midnight and the climb takes about three hours. There are stopping points along the way where pilgrims pray before continuing. Many visit the small chapel at the top where masses are celebrated. More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Bastille Day (prise de la Bastille)


Bastille Day

Prise de la Bastille Jean-Pierre Houël (1735-1813) – Bibliothèque nationale de France

The Bastille was a 14th-century fortress that became a notorious state prison in Paris. An angry mob assaulted the Bastille—which had come to symbolize the French monarchy‘s oppression of the people—on July 14, 1789, freeing the political prisoners held there and launching the French Revolution. July 14 has been celebrated since that time in France as Fête Nationale, as well as in French territories in the Pacific, with parades, fireworks and dancing in the streets. In Tahiti and the rest of French Polynesia, it is called Tiurai or Heiva, and is celebrated for most of the month. More… Discuss

 

today’s holiday: Independence Day (4th of July)


Independence Day (United States)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
“Fourth of July” and “4th of July” redirect here. For the date, see July 4. For other uses, see Independence Day (disambiguation). For other related material, see Fourth of July (disambiguation).
Independence Day
Fourth of July fireworks behind the Washington Monument, 1986.jpg

Displays of fireworks, such as these over the Washington Monument, take place across the United States on Independence Day.
Also called The Fourth of July
The Fourth
Observed by United States
Type National
Significance The day in 1776 that the Declaration of Independence was adopted by the Continental Congress
Celebrations Fireworks, Family reunions, Concerts, Barbecues, Picnics, Parades, Baseball games
Date July 4
Next time 4 July 2015
Frequency annual

Independence Day, commonly known as the Fourth of July, is a federal holiday in the United States of America commemorating the adoption of the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776, declaring independence from the Kingdom of Great Britain (now officially known as the United Kingdom). Independence Day is commonly associated with fireworks, parades, barbecues, carnivals, fairs, picnics, concerts, baseball games, family reunions, and political speeches and ceremonies, in addition to various other public and private events celebrating the history, government, and traditions of the United States. Independence Day is the National Day of the United States.[1][2][3]

today’s holiday: Apache Maidens’ Puberty Rites


Apache Maidens’ Puberty Rites

The Apache Maidens’ Puberty Rites are a coming-of-age celebration of girls of the Mescalero Apache Tribe, held for four days and nights around the Fourth of July in Mescalero, New Mexico. On the first and last days, the girls run around a basket four times, symbolizing the four stages of life (infancy, childhood, adulthood, and old age). On the last day, their faces are painted with white clay and they enact the role of White Painted Woman, preparing for a rewarding adult life. Other events include a rodeo, a powwow, a parade on July 4, and the nighttime Dance of the Mountain Gods. More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Dog Days


Dog Days

The Dog Days are known as the hottest days of the year in the Northern Hemisphere, and usually occur in July and early August. In ancient times, the sultry weather in Rome during these months often made people sick, which they blamed on the fact that this was when Sirius, the Dog Star, rose at about the same time as the sun. There are many different ways of calculating which days in any given year are the dog days, but it is impossible to be precise; nowadays it is generally assumed that they fall between July 3 and August 11—slightly later than they occurred in ancient times. More… Discuss