Tag Archives: Karl Richter

Great Compositions/Performances: Bach-Richter-Brandenburg Concerto No.3 (HD)


[youtube.com/watch?v=mB1M2HaEbI4]

Bach-Richter-Brandenburg Concerto No.3 (HD)

English: Statue of J.S. Bach close Thomaskirch...

English: Statue of J.S. Bach close Thomaskirche in Leipzig. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

J.S. Bach: Brandenburg Concerto No. 3 in G Major, BWV 1048
Münchener Bach OrchesterKarl Richter (HD video)

Enhanced by Zemanta

Brilliant Music: Bach – Cantata BWV 140 – Peter Schreier – Sleepers wake


Bach – Cantata BWV 140Peter Schreier – Sleepers wake

Zion hoert die Waechter singen 
Conductor: Karl Richter
Tenor: Peter Schreier
Orchestra: Munich Bach Choir, Munich Bach Orchestra
Sleepers Wake

from wikipedia

Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme (Awake, calls the voice to us), BWV 140, also known as Sleepers Wake, is achurch cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed the chorale cantata in Leipzig for the 27th Sunday afterTrinity and first performed it on 25 November 1731. It is based on the hymn “Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme” (1599) by Philipp Nicolai. Movement 4 of the cantata is the base for the first of Bach’s Schübler Chorales, BWV 645. The cantata is a late addition to Bach’s cycle of chorale cantatas, featuring additional poetry for two duets of Jesus and the Soul which expand the theme of the hymn.

History and text

Bach composed the cantata in Leipzig for the 27th Sunday after Trinity. This Sunday occurs only when Easter is extremely early.[1] The prescribed readings for the Sunday were from the First Epistle to the Thessalonians, be prepared for the day of the Lord (1 Thessalonians 5:1–11), and from the Gospel of Matthew, the parable of the Ten Virgins (Matthew 25:1–13).[2] The chorale cantata is based on the Lutheran hymn in three stanzas, “Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme” of Philipp Nicolai, which is based on the Gospel.[1] Bach composed the cantata to complete his cycle of chorale cantatas which he had begun in 1724.[3][4] The text of the three stanzas appears unchanged in movements 1, 4 and 7, while an unknown author supplied poetry for movements 2 and 3, 5 and 6, both a sequence ofrecitative and duet.[5] He refers to the love poetry of the Song of Songs, showing Jesus as the bridegroom of the Soul.[3] According to Christoph Wolff, the text was already available when Bach composed his cycle of chorale cantatas.[6]

Bach performed the cantata only once, in Leipzig’s main church Nikolaikirche on 25 November 1731.[3] According toChristoph Wolff, Bach performed it only this one time, although the 27th Sunday after Trinity occurred one more time during his tenure in Leipzig, in 1742.[1] He used movement 4 of the cantata as the base for the first of his Schübler Chorales, BWV 645.[6]

Related articles

Enhanced by Zemanta

Johann Sebastian Bach – Toccata and Fugue in D minor (BWV 565) with Karl Richter



Karl Richter performs Bach’s Toccata and Fugue in D minor (BWV 565) on the Organ of the Basilika in Ottobeuren

Ottobeuren Abbey has one of the richest music programs in Bavaria, with concerts every Saturday. Most concerts feature one or more of the Abbey’s famous organs. The old organ, the masterpiece of French organbuilder Karl Joseph Riepp (1710–75), is actually a double organ; it is one of the most treasured historic organs in Europe. It was the main instrument for 200 years, until 1957 when a third organ was added by G. F. Steinmeyer & Co, renovated and augmented in 2002 by Johannes Klais, making 100 stops available on five manuals (or keyboards).
(Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ottobeuren_Abbey)

Karl Richter (15 October 1926 – 15 February 1981) was a German conductor, organist, and harpsichordist. He was born in Plauen and studied first in Dresden, where he was a member of the Dresdner Kreuzchor and later in Leipzig, where he received his degree in 1949. He studied with Günther Ramin, Carl Straube and Rudolf Mauersberger. In the same year, he became organist at St. Thomas Church, Leipzig, where Johann Sebastian Bach once held the position as Musical Director. In 1951, he moved to Munich, where he taught at the conservatory and was cantor and organist at St. Mark’s Church. He also conducted the Münchener Bach-Chor starting in 1954 and the Münchener Bach-Orchester. In the 1960s and 1970s, he did a great deal of recording and undertook tours to Japan, the United States, Canada, Latin-America, Eastern Europe including the Soviet Union.

He conducted a wide range of music (sacred music from Heinrich Schütz to Max Reger, as well as the symphonic and concerto repertoire of the Classical and Romantic period, including Bruckner symphonies) but is best remembered today for his interpretations of Johann Sebastian Bach‘s and Händel‘s music. Karl Richter avoided the fluctuations in tempo that were then characteristic of the prevailing Romantic manner of conducting Bach, but did not incorporate period instruments and performing techniques into his performances, innovations in Baroque performance practice which had not yet fully blossomed during Richter’s career.

As well as a conductor, Karl Richter is also remembered as an excellent organist. His performances of Bach’s organ pieces are known for their imposing registrations and favorable pace.

While staying in a hotel in Munich in 1981, Karl Richter died from a heart attack. He was buried in the Enzenbühl cemetery in Zurich 8 days later.

Although both of them are of German heritage, Karl Richter has no family relationship with the renowned Russian pianist Sviatoslav Richter. (Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karl_Richter_(conductor)

Related Article: