Tag Archives: Kiev


Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

Today in History
May 5

1494   Christopher Columbus lands on the island of Jamaica, which he names Santa Gloria.
1814   British attack the American forces at Ft. Ontario, Oswego, New York.
1821   Napoleon Bonaparte dies in exile on the island of St. Helena.
1834   The first mainland railway line opens in Belgium.
1862   Union and Confederate forces clash at the Battle of Williamsburg, part of the Peninsula Campaign.
1862   Mexican forces loyal to Benito Juarez defeat troops sent by Napoleon III in the Battle of Puebla.
1865   The 13th Amendment is ratified, abolishing slavery.
1886   A bomb explodes on the fourth day of a workers’ strike in Chicago.
1912   Soviet Communist Party newspaper Pravda begins publishing.
1916   U.S. Marines invade the Dominican Republic.
1917   Eugene Jacques Bullard becomes the first African-American aviator when he earns a flying certificate with the French Air Service.
1920   Anarchists Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti are arrested for murder.
1935   American Jesse Owens sets the long jump record.
1942   General Joseph Stilwell learns that the Japanese have cut his railway out of China and is forced to lead his troops into India.
1945   Holland and Denmark are liberated from Nazi control.
1961   Alan Shepard becomes the first American in space.
1965   173rd Airborne Brigade arrives in Bien Hoa-Vung, Vietnam, the first regular U.S. Army unit deployed to that country.
1968   U.S. Air Force planes hit Nhi Ha, South Vietnam in support of attacking infantrymen.
1969   Pulitzer Prize awarded to Norman Mailer for his ‘nonfiction novel’ Armies of the Night, an account of the 1967 anti-Vietnam War march on the Pentagon.
1987   Congress opens Iran-Contra hearings.
2000   The Sun, Earth, Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn align – Earth’s moon is also almost in this alignment – leading to Doomsday predictions of massive natural disasters, although such a ‘grand confluence’ occurs about once in every century.
Born on May 5
1813   Soren Kierkegaard, Danish philosopher.
1818   Karl Marx, German philosopher (The Communist Manifesto, Das Kapital).
1830   John B. Stetson, American hat maker.
1861   Peter Cooper Hewitt, electrical engineer, inventor of the mercury-vapor lamp.
1883   Charles Albert “Chief” Bender, baseball player.
1890   Christopher Morley, writer (Kitty Foyle).
1899   Freeman F. Gosden, radio comedy writer and performer (Amos ‘n’ Andy).
1909   Carlos Baker, biographer.
1943   Michael Palin, actor and screenwriter (Monty Python’s Flying Circus).

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/today-in-history#sthash.6DhlyMv5.dpuf

Tchaikovsky – Andante Cantabile for Cello and String Orchestra


Tchaikovsky – Andante Cantabile in B major,  for Cello and String Orchestra

this pressed for your right to know: The broken-down beauty of Eastern Ukraine, 25 years after the end of the USSR | Where do We go from Here?


Before there was a raging civil war that devastated the region’s infrastructure and polarized its population, the Donbass region in Eastern Ukraine was an economically depressed area, far removed from the authority of the central government in Kiev.

Historically, Donbass—known officially as the Donets Basin, which encompasses the Donetsk and Luhansk oblasts—was the center of Soviet industrialism, a region that symbolized the power of Soviet might where towns and cities sprung up alongside coal mines and factories. Following the USSR’s collapse, however, much of the region lay in ruins.

The AllFall- Donbass Romanticism

The AllFall- Donbass Romanticism

That’s the theme behind the series, “Donbass Romanticism,” by Moldovan-born photojournalist Misha Friedman, who photographed the region in 2010 and 2011 while living in Kiev. Friedman set out to depict the ruined, crumbling infrastructure as a symbol of government neglect and the collapse of Soviet ideals.

via The broken-down beauty of Eastern Ukraine, 25 years after the end of the USSR | Where do We go from Here?.

Russia says Ukraine monitors biased


Russia says Ukraine monitors biased http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-30056604

this pressed-for the record: Flash – Ukraine president replaces Donetsk governor with hardline general – France 24


AFP

A woman walks past grafitti reading

A woman walks past grafitti reading “Donetsk will be free”, and bearing a Russian flag in Donetsk on October 10, 2014

A woman walks past grafitti reading “Donetsk will be free”, and bearing a Russian flag in Donetsk on October 10, 2014

Ukraine’s president on Friday fired a millionaire businessman who failed to stop the advance of pro-Russian rebels while governor of war-torn Donetsk and replaced him with a hardline nationalist general.

via Flash – Ukraine president replaces Donetsk governor with hardline general – France 24.

Today In History: What Happened This Day In History


Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this

day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

September 14
1146   Zangi of the Near East is murdered. The Sultan Nur ad-Din, his son, pursues the conquest of Edessa.
1321   Dante Alighieri dies of malaria just hours after finishing writing Paradiso.
1544   Henry VIII’s forces take Boulogne, France.
1773   Russian forces under Aleksandr Suvorov successfully storm a Turkish fort at Hirsov, Turkey.
1791   Louis XVI swears his allegiance to the French constitution.
1812   Napoleon Bonaparte’s invasion of Russia reaches its climax as his Grande Armee enters Moscow–only to find the enemy capital deserted and burning, set afire by the few Russians who remained.
1814   Francis Scott Key writes the words to the “Star Spangled Banner” as he waits aboard a British launch in the Chesapeake Bay for the outcome of the British assault on Fort McHenry during the War of 1812.
1847   U.S. forces under Gen. Winfield Scott capture Mexico City, virtually bringing the two-year Mexican War to a close.
1853   The Allies land at Eupatoria on the west coast of Crimea.
1862   At the battles of South Mountain and Crampton’s Gap, Maryland Union troops smash into the Confederates as they close in on what will become the Antietam battleground.
1901   Vice President Theodore Roosevelt is sworn in as the 26th President of the United States upon the death of William McKinley, who was shot eight days earlier.
1911   Russian Premier Piotr Stolypin is mortally wounded in an assassination attempt at the Kiev opera house.
1943   German troops abandon the Salerno front in Italy..
1960   Iraq, Iran, Kuwait and Saudi Arabia form OPEC.
1966   Operation Attleboro, designed as a training exercise for American troops, becomes a month-long struggle against the Viet Cong.
1975   Mother Elizabeth Ann Seton becomes the first native-born American saint in the Roman Catholic Church.
1979   Nur Muhammad Taraki, president and former prime minister of Afghanistan, is assassinated in a coup in which prime minister Hafizullah Amin seizes power.
1982   Bachir Gemayel, president-elect of Lebanon, is killed along with 26 others in a bomb blast in Beirut.
1984   Joe Kittinger, a former USAF fighter pilot during the Vietnam War, becomes the first person to pilot a gas balloon solo across the Atlantic Ocean.
1994   Major League Baseball players strike over a salary cap and other proposed changes, forcing the cancellation of the entire postseason and the World Series.
2007   Northern Rock Bank suffers the UK’s first bank run in 150 years.
Born on September 14
1769   Baron Freidrich von Humbolt, German naturalist and explorer who made the first isothermic and isobaric maps.
1849   Ivan Pavlov, Russian physiologist who studied dogs’ responsiveness.
1860   Hamlin Garland, author who wrote about the Midwest in novles such as A Son of the Middle Border and The Book of the American Indian.
1864   Lord Robert Cecil, one of the founders of the League of Nations and its president from 1923 to 1945.
1867   Charles Dana Gibson, illustrator, creator of the ‘Gibson Girl.’
1879   Margaret Sanger, birth-control advocate and founder of Planned Parenthood.
1898   Hal B. Wallis, film producer (The Maltese Falcon, Casablanca).
1921   Constance Baker Motley, first African-American woman to be appointed a federal judge.
1930   Allan Bloom, writer (The Closing of the American Mind).
1934   Kate Millet, feminist writer, author of Sexual Politics.
1936   Ferid Murad, Albanian-American physician and pharmacologist, is co-winner of Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his research on nitroglycerin’s effects the cardiovascular system.
1948   Marc Reisner, author and environmentalist best known for his book Cadillac Desert, a history of water management in the Western portion of the US.
1955   Geraldine Brooks, Australian-American journalist and author; her novel March won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction (2005).
1961   Wendy Thomas (Melinda “Wendy” Thomas Morse), namesake, mascot and spokesperson for the Wendy’s chain of fast-food restaurants.
1983   Amy Winehouse, singer-songwriter; her five Grammy wins (out of six nominations) for her Back to Black album (2006) tied the existing record for most wins by a female artist in a single night; won Brit Award for Best British Female Artist (2007).

 

Modest Mussorgsky “Pictures at an Exhibition” Celibidache London Symphony Orchestra, conductor: Sergiu Celibidache: great compositions/performances


Modest Mussorgsky “Pictures at an Exhibition” Celibidache London Symphony Orchestra,  conductor: Sergiu Celibidache

this pressed: Ukraine: Nato hält Niederlage für Kiew für sicher – SPIEGEL ONLINE (Analysis of the military situation: NATO sees Ukraine as already loser)



Ukraine: Prorussische Separatisten auf dem Vormarsch

Ukraine: Nato hält Niederlage für Kiew für sicher – SPIEGEL ONLINE.

(Analysis of the military situation: NATO sees Ukraine as already loser)

Excerpts from article:  “Kiev / Moscow NATO has changed its military assessment of the situation in eastern Ukraine fundamentally. A week ago, the strategists of the Alliance assumed that Russia has strengthened the separatists with covert troops only because the pro-Russian rebels had to retreat under pressure of the Ukrainian army.

When the generals of the alliance but then late last week to a crisis meeting on the situation of the army of the Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko came together, they painted a grim picture. Militarily, the conflict for Kiev is already lost,” stated a senior NATO general. Poroshenko, the judgment, were really only talks to withdraw his men alive from the pliers of the Russians“.

The location descriptions behind closed doors were far more dramatic than the few images that NATO published mid-week. On large maps were marked with thick arrows Russian units, which now from the north, the west and the south on the border of eastern Ukraine are at least 20 Battalions  with a minimum of 500 men and heavy guns are the scouts of NATO.”
(translation from German to English with the aid of Google Translate online service)

Modest Mussorgsky – Saint John’s Night on the Bare Mountain (Original score) / Abbado – LSO: great compositions/performances



FROM:   Panagiotis Papadakos  Panagiotis Papadakos

Modest Mussorgsky – Saint John’s Night on the Bare Mountain (Original score) / Abbado – LSO

The original Mussorgsky score (1867) and not the Rimsky Korsakov one (1886).

From wikipedia:
Night on Bald Mountain is a composition by Modest Mussorgsky that exists in, at least, two versions—a seldom performed 1867 version or a later (1886) and very popular “fantasy for orchestra” arranged by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov, A Night on the Bare Mountain (Ночь на лысой горе, Noch’ na lysoy gorye), based on the vocal score of the “Dream Vision of the Peasant Lad” (1880) from The Fair at Sorochyntsi with some revisions, most notably the omission of the choir.[citation needed] There is also a version orchestrated by twentieth-century conductor Leopold Stokowski; this is the version used in the now-classic 1940 Walt Disney animated film Fantasia.

Inspired by Russian literary works and legend, Mussorgsky made a witches’ sabbath the theme of the original tone poem, completed on 23 June 1867 (St. John’s Eve). St. John’s Night on the Bare Mountain and Rimsky-Korsakov’s “musical picture” Sadko (also composed in 1867) share the distinction of being the first tone poems by Russian composers.

As with so much of Mussorgsky’s music, the work had a tortuous compositional history and was arranged after his death in 1881 by his friend and fellow member of The Mighty Handful Rimsky-Korsakov. It was never performed in any form during Mussorgsky’s lifetime.[2] The Rimsky-Korsakov edition premiered in 1886, and has become a concert favorite.

Setting:
Russian legend tells of a witches’ sabbath taking place on St. John’s Night (June 23–24) on the Lysa Hora (Bald Mountain), near Kiev.

Program:
The following program is taken from the score: Сбор ведьм, их толки и сплетни (Assembly of the witches, their chatter and gossip) Поезд Сатаны (Cortège of Satan) Чёрная служба, Messe noire (Black service, Black mass) Шабаш (Sabbath)

More details and a variation to this program may be found in a letter written by the composer to Vladimir Nikolsky: “So far as my memory doesn’t deceive me, the witches used to gather on this mountain, gossip, play tricks and await their chief — Satan. On his arrival they, i.e. the witches, formed a circle round the throne on which he sat, in the form of a kid, and sang his praise. When Satan was worked up into a sufficient passion by the witches’ praises, he gave the command for the sabbath, in which he chose for himself the witches who caught his fancy. –So this is what I’ve done.
At the head of my score I’ve put its content:
1. Assembly of the witches, their talk and gossip;
2. Satan’s journey;
3. Obscene praises of Satan; and
4. Sabbath… The form and character of the composition are both Russian and original”.

great compositions/performances: Mussorgsky: Pictures at an exhibition ( Full ) – BPO / Karajan*


[youtube.com/watch?v=kkC3chi_ysw]

Mussorgsky: Pictures at an exhibition ( Full ) – BPO / Karajan*

Herbert Von Karajan for PIFAL

Herbert Von Karajan for PIFAL (Photo credit: Arturo Espinosa)

With the original survived pictures of Hartmann and others

this pressed: BBC News – Ukraine crisis: Russia must engage with Kiev, says G7


BBC News – Ukraine crisis: Russia must engage with Kiev, says G7.

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BBC News – Ukraine soldiers killed in renewed Sloviansk fighting


Map showing eastern UkraineBBC News – Ukraine soldiers killed in renewed Sloviansk fighting.

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DEATHS CLIMB IN UKRAINE UNREST


Deaths Climb in Ukraine Unrest

Clashes between pro- and anti-Russian activists in Odessa in southwestern Ukraine claimed dozens of lives on Friday, while in the eastern, rebel-held city ofSlovianskseparatists shot down two Ukrainian army helicopters involved in operations to take back the city. Moscow condemned the “punitive” operations in Sloviansk, saying Ukraine had violated a peace deal by firing on civilians from the air, but Kiev countered saying that the use of missiles to bring down its helicopters proves that Russian forces had already infiltrated the area. More… Discuss

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Visit at your own risk! I personally expressed my wish not to be associated in any way with this instigating website listed on my discussion settings!


http://usconstitutionalfreepress.wordpress.com/

click to access this site (at your own risk) AKA john galt keeps rebblogging my copyrighted posts even after my expressed wish that he abstain!

Visit at your own risk! I personally expressed my wish not to be associated in any way with this instigating website listed on my discussion settings!

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NEWS: CONTROVERSIAL CRIMEA REFERENDUM DRAWS SANCTIONS


Controversial Crimea Referendum Draws Sanctions

Despite opposition from Kiev and the West, Crimeamoved forward with a referendum in which voters overwhelmingly backed seceding from Ukraine and joining Russia. Given the buildup of Russian troops in the region and the hurried nature of the referendum, many question the legitimacy of the vote. Nevertheless, Crimean officials—whose authority is also contested—lost little time in formally applying to join Russia. The US and EU responses were swift, though not as far-reaching as some had hoped; sanctions were imposed on a number of individuals in Russia and Crimea who pushed for or helped carry out the referendum. More… Discuss

 

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WORD: BAREFACED


barefaced 

Definition: (adjective) With no effort to conceal.
Synonyms: bald
Usage: They attacked him in various ways—with barefaced questions, ingenious suppositions, and distant surmises; but he eluded the skill of them all. Discuss

 

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: THE ST. SCHOLASTICA DAY RIOT (1355)


The St. Scholastica Day Riot (1355)

Oxford is one of the most prestigious universities in the world, but its history is not without blemish. In 1355, some students got into an argument with a local tavern keeper over the quality of his alcohol. This escalated into a physical altercation that then snowballed into an all-out riot between the university’s students and townspeople. When the dust settled days later, 63 students and a number of townspeople were dead. Which side paid reparations to the other for the next 470 years? More…

 

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Mussorgsky: Pictures At An Exhibition-“Baba Yaga”,”Great gate of Kiew”



The Auckland Philharmonia Orchestra under the baton from Eckehard Stier performed Mussorgsky‘s Pictures at an exhibition and the highlights “Baba Yaga and “The great Gate from Kiev” live at Auckland Town Hall in February 2010.