Tag Archives: KINDERSZENEN

Martha Argerich plays Schumann – Kinderszenen (Scenes from Childhood) Op. 15


Martha Argerich Schumann – Kinderszenen (Scenes from Childhood) Op. 15

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Schumann Kinderszenen op. 15 Radu Lupu

Published on Oct 18, 2013

Robert Schumann Kinderszenen, op. 15
Radu Lupu , January 1993

Kinderszenen

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

First edition title page

Kinderszenen (German pronunciation: [ˈkɪndɐˌst͡seːnən]; original spelling Kinderscenen, “Scenes from Childhood”), Opus 15, by Robert Schumann, is a set of thirteen pieces of music for piano written in 1838. In this work, Schumann provides us with his adult reminiscences of childhood. Schumann had originally written 30 movements for this work, but chose 13 for the final version.[1] Robert Polansky has discussed the unused movements.[2]

Nr. 7, Träumerei, is one of Schumann’s best known pieces; it was the title of a 1944 German biographical film on Robert Schumann.[3] Träumerei is also the opening and closing musical theme in the 1947 Hollywood film Song of Love, starring Katharine Hepburn as Clara Wieck Schumann.[4]

Schumann had originally labeled this work Leichte Stücke (Easy Pieces). Likewise, the section titles were only added after the completion of the music, and Schumann described the titles as “nothing more than delicate hints for execution and interpretation”.[5] Timothy Taylor has discussed Schumann’s choice of titles for this work in the context of the changing situation of music in 19th century culture and economics.[6]

In 1974, Eric Sams noted that there was no known complete manuscript of Kinderszenen.[7]

Parts/Movements

  1. Von fremden Ländern und Menschen (Of Foreign Lands and Peoples),  G major
  2. Curiose Geschichte (A Curious Story),  D major
  3. Hasche-Mann (Blind Man’s Buff), B minor
  4. Bittendes Kind (Pleading Child), D major
  5. Glückes genug (Quite Happy), D major
  6. Wichtige Bebebenheit (An Important Event), A major
  7. Träumerei (Dreaming), F major
  8. Am Camin (At the Fireside), F major
  9. Ritter vom Steckenpferd (Knight of the Hobby-Horse), C major
  10. Fast zu ernst (Almost too Serious), G-sharp minor
  11. Fürchtenmachen (Frightening), E minor
  12. Kind im Einschlummern (Child Falling Asleep), E minor
  13. Ffrom Der Dichter spricht (The Poet Speaks), G major

Description by Blair Johnston  (ALL MUSIC)

The 13 pieces that constitute Robert Schumann‘s Kinderszenen for piano (Scenes from Childhood), Op. 15 (1838) showcase their creator’s musical imagination at the peak of its poetic clarity. As a result, the Kinderszenen have long been staples of the repertoire as utterly charming yet substantial miniatures, the sort of compact keyboard essays in which Schumann‘s genius found full expression. Kinderszenen was one of the projects Schumann worked on during the spring of 1838 to get through a difficult period of separation from his fiancée, Clara Wieck, who was on tour as a pianist and whose father objected to the idea of her marriage to the composer. In March of that year, Schumann wrote to Clara, “I have been waiting for your letter and have in the meantime filled several books with pieces…. You once said to me that I often seemed like a child, and I suddenly got inspired and knocked off around 30 quaint little pieces…. I selected several and titled them Kinderszenen. You will enjoy them, though you will need to forget that you are a virtuoso when you play them.” The Kinderszenen are a touching tribute to the eternal, universal memories and feelings of childhood from a nostalgic adult perspective; unlike a number of Schumann‘s collections of piano character pieces (e.g. Album for the Young, Op. 68), the Kinderszenen are not intended to be played by children. Schumann claimed that the picturesque titles attached to the pieces were added as an afterthought in order to provide subtle suggestions to the player, a model Debussy followed decades later in his Preludes. Almost all of the Kinderszenen are miniature ternary (ABA) forms. Scene No. 1, “Von fremden Ländern und Menschen” (Of Foreign Lands and People), opens with a lovely melody whose basic motivic substance, by appearing in several vague guises throughout many of the other pieces, serves as a general unifying element. The seventh Scene, “Träumerei” (Reverie), is easily the most famous piece in the set; its charming melody and quieting power have recommended it to generations of concert pianists who wish to calm audiences after a long series of rousing encores. The Kinderszenen contain many delicate musical touches; Scene No. 4, “Bittendes Kind” (Pleading Child), for example, is harmonically resolved only when an unseen force (a parent?) gives in and grant the child’s wish at the beginning of No. 5, “Glückes genug” (Quite Happy). In the final piece, “Der Dichter spricht” (The Poet Speaks), Schumann removes himself just a bit from the indulgent reverie to formulate a narrator’s omniscient view of the child. Quietly, gently, the many moods and feelings that Schumann touched upon over the course of this remarkable 20-minute work are lovingly recalled, and the composition concludes, contentedly, in the same key of G major in which it began.

Clara Haskil plays Schumann Kinderszenen Op. 15: unique musical moments


Clara Haskil plays Schumann Kinderszenen Op. 15

make music part of your life series: Horowitz plays Schumann Toccata in C Major, Op.7


[youtube.com/watch?v=0oHAvmvmYUo]

Horowitz plays Schumann Toccata in C Major, Op.7

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Schumann Kinderszenen Op 15 – Valentina Lisitsa


[youtube.com/watch?v=Aq8LDUCw6sg]

Schumann Kinderszenen Op 15 – Valentina Lisitsa Haskil Argerich Horowitz Bosendorfer

 

First edition title page

Kinderszenen (German pronunciation: [ˈkɪndɐˌst͡seːnən]; original spelling Kinderscenen, “Scenes from Childhood“), Opus 15, by Robert Schumann, is a set of thirteen pieces of music for piano written in 1838. In this work, Schumann provides us with his adult reminiscences of childhood. Schumann had originally written 30 movements for this work, but chose 13 for the final version.[1] Robert Polansky has discussed the unused movements.[2]

Nr. 7, Träumerei, is one of Schumann’s best known pieces; it was the title of a 1944 German biographical film on Robert Schumann.[3] Träumerei is also the opening and closing musical theme in the 1947 Hollywood film Song of Love, starring Katharine Hepburn as Clara Wieck Schumann.[4]

Schumann had originally labeled this work Leichte Stücke (Easy Pieces). Likewise, the section titles were only added after the completion of the music, and Schumann described the titles as “nothing more than delicate hints for execution and interpretation”.[5] Timothy Taylor has discussed Schumann’s choice of titles for this work in the context of the changing situation of music in 19th century culture and economics.[6]

In 1974, Eric Sams noted that there was no known complete manuscript of Kinderszenen

Movements
Title Key Play
1. Von fremden Ländern und Menschen
Of Foreign Lands and Peoples
G major
 
Menu
 
0:00
2. Kuriose Geschichte
A Curious Story
[8]
D major
 
Menu
 
0:00
3. Hasche-Mann
Blind Man’s Bluff
B minor
 
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0:00
4. Bittendes Kind
Pleading Child
D major
 
Menu
 
0:00
5. Glückes genug
Happy Enough
D major
 
Menu
 
0:00
6. Wichtige Begebenheit
An Important Event
A major
 
Menu
 
0:00
7. Träumerei
Dreaming
F major
 
Menu
 
0:00
8. Am Kamin
At the Fireside
[9]
F major
 
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0:00
9. Ritter vom Steckenpferd
Knight of the Hobbyhorse
C major
 
Menu
 
0:00
10. Fast zu ernst
Almost Too Serious
G-sharp minor
 
Menu
 
0:00
11. Fürchtenmachen
Frightening
E minor
 
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0:00
12. Kind im Einschlummern
Child Falling Asleep
E minor
 
Menu
 
0:00
13. Der Dichter spricht
The Poet Speaks
G major
 
Menu
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Great Compositions/Performances: Horowitz plays Schumann Toccata in C Major, Op.7



Robert Schumann 
Toccata in C Major, Op.7 
Vladimir Horowitz: piano

 

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Sergei Rachmaninoff plays Schumann “Carnaval” Op. 9



Robert Schumann, Carnaval Op. 9
Part I
1. Préambule
2. Pierrot
3. Arlequin
4. Valse noble
5. Eusebius
6. Florestan
7. Coquette
8. Réplique
– Sphinxes
9. Papillons

 

Emil Gilels spielt Robert Schumann: Arabeske Op. 18



Ort: Moskauer Konservatorium 1977

 

Leonid Kogan – Schumann – Fantasie in C major, Op 131


Robert Schumann
Fantasie in C major, Op 131
(arranged for violin and piano)

Leonid Kogan, violin
Andrei Mytnik, piano

Live recording, 1953

 

Schumann Kinderszenen Op 15 – Valentina Lisitsa



Schumann Kinderszenen Op 15 – Valentina Lisitsa Haskil Argerich Horowitz Bosendorfer:

no.1 Of Foreign Lands and Peoples

1:32 no.2 Curious Story

2:37 no.3 Blindman’s Bluff

3:09 no.4 Entreating Child

3:54 no.5 Perfect Happiness

4:33 no.6 Important Event

5:22 no.7 Dreaming

7:55 no.8 Near The Fire Side

I love no.7 (Traumerei)

Robert Schumann Symphonic Studies (Etudes Symphoniques) op.13 (complete) Mehmet Okonsar,piano



Robert Schumann Symphonic Studies (Etudes Symphoniques) op.13 (complete) Mehmet Okonsar,piano

 

Emil Gilels spielt Robert Schumann: Arabeske Op. 18



Ort: Moskauer Konservatorium 1977

 

Horowitz – Schumann Traumereï (Kinderszenen)



1978 Vladimir Horowitz TV concert from the White House.

1. Horowitz, The Star-Spangled Banner
2. Chopin, Sonata n°2 in B flat minor
3. Chopin, Waltz op. 34 n°2 in A minor
4. Chopin, Waltz op. 64 n°2 in C sharp minor
5. Chopin, Polonaise op. 53 in A flat major

1st encore: Schumann, Traumereï from Kinderszenen
2nd encore: Rachmaninoff, Polka de W.R. in A flat major
3rd encore: Horowitz, Variations on a theme from Bizet‘s Carmen

 

J.S. Bach – Harpsichord or (Organ) Concerto in d minor, BWV 1059 / Ton Koopman, organ



Johann Sebastian Bach (1685~1750)
Konzert für Clavier, Streicher und Basso Continuo d-moll, BWV 1059
(incomplete work, revision by Ton Koopman version)
I. Sinfonia (from cantata, BWV 35: Sinfonia) – 00:00
II. Aria (from cantata, BWV 35: “Gott hat alles wohlgemacht”) – 05:18
III. Sinfonia: presto (from cantata, BWV 35: Second Sinfonia) – 08:59
Ton Koopman (orgel)
Ku Ebbinge (oboe da caccia)
The Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra
Ton Koopman (conductor)
*Clavier(Keyboard): harpsichord, clavichord, claviorganum, or organ etc.* 
 Concerto in d minor, BWV 1059 (incomplete) – 

Fragment consisting of 9 bars(only the first 9 bars survive in Bach’s own hand). Taken from the opening Sinfonia of the Cantata, BWV 35 “Geist und Seele wird verwirret” (1726) In the cantata, Bach uses an obbligato organ not only in the two sinfonias (which evidently form the first and last movements of a lost instrumental concerto, possibly for Oboe) but also in the aria No. 1, whose siciliano character likewise points to its original function as a concerto movement. Bach intended to write this out as a harpsichord concerto but abandoned the endeavor after only 9 bars. Continue reading