Tag Archives: Lascaux

this day in the yesteryear: Teens Stumble upon Ancient Cave Paintings in Lascaux, France (1940)


Teens Stumble upon Ancient Cave Paintings in Lascaux, France (1940)

In 1940, four teens uncovered a fantastic archeological site, a cave system decorated with prehistoric paintings, drawings, and engravings that have been dated to about 15,000–13,000 BCE. Many of the paintings are drawn over former works, enabling experts to trace stylistic developments over more than 1,000 years. The later paintings, featuring animals along with signs and symbols, exhibit an advanced artistic quality and technical skill. Why was the cave closed to the public in 1963? More… Discuss

 

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this day in the yesteryear: The Caves of Nerja Are Rediscovered (1959)


The Caves of Nerja Are Rediscovered (1959)

One of Spain’s major tourist attractions is the Caves of Nerja, a series of caverns near the town of Nerja in the Province of Málaga. The caves were inhabited by prehistoric peoples, who left their mark in the form of paintings and other artifacts. Today, visitors can tour parts of the caves’ three galleries and view skeletons and other items on display there. Concerts are also regularly held in one of the caves’ many chambers. How did five friends inadvertently rediscover the caves in 1959? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: William Semple Files Chewing Gum Patent (1869)


William Semple Files Chewing Gum Patent (1869)

Existing in various forms since prehistoric times, chewing gum is one of the oldest types of candy still widely consumed today. Early chewing gums were made from plant resins. In 1869, dentist William Semple patented a rubber-based chewing gum that he envisioned as a tooth cleaning product. Around that time, confectioners discovered that chicle, a natural latex that was being explored as a possible rubber substitute, was an ideal gum base. What country banned chewing gum in 1992? More… Discuss

Cave Paintings Redraw History of Human Art


Cave Paintings Redraw History of Human Art

Experts are rethinking the theory of the origins of human artistic activity after cave paintings on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi were dated to 40,000 years ago. Until now, it had been thought that cave art emerged in Western Europe about 40,000 years ago, but it would seem that it in fact emerged simultaneously in various regions of the globe. The paintings in question contain stencils of human hands and naturalistic depictions of animals. More… Discuss