Tag Archives: latin america

Pope says his concern for poor comes from Gospel | bt24News We all know that Marx was born some 19 centuries after the birth of Christianity)


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A seagull flies near the window as Pope Francis reads out his Sunday Angelus prayer in the Vatican on Sunday.— AP

Pope Francis is insisting that his concern for the poor and critique of the global economic system isn’t some novel, communist-inspired ideology but rather the original and core “touchstone” of the Christian faith.

Some US conservatives have branded the first Latin American pope a Marxist for his frequent critiques of consumerism and focus on a church “that is poor and for the poor.” But in an interview contained in a new book, Pope Francis explains that his message is rooted in the Gospel and has been echoed by church fathers since Christianity’s first centuries.

via Pope says his concern for poor comes from Gospel | bt24News.

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today’s holiday: El Pochó Dance-Drama (2015)


El Pochó Dance-Drama (2015)

St. Sebastian’s Day is celebrated throughout Latin America, but the dance-drama El Pochó, which takes place in Tenosique in Tabasco State, Mexico, on this day, is unique. On the morning of January 20, everyone gathers at the prearranged location: a house or a plaza. The pochoveras enter in their long skirts and embroidered blouses and perform the initial dance. Then the cojóes enter, wearing masks with exaggerated features. Soon the tigres (jaguars) invade the dance space, and the cojóes and tigres play at hunting each other until, finally, they join forces to chase the audience. More… Discuss

Eastern Christianity From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Eastern Christianity

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

Eastern Christianity comprises the Christian traditions and churches that developed in the Balkans, Eastern Europe, Asia Minor, the Middle East, Africa, India, and parts of the Far East over several centuries of religious antiquity.

The term is generally used in Western Christianity to describe all Christian traditions that did not develop in Western Europe. As such, the term does not describe any single communion or common religious tradition, and in fact some “Eastern” Churches have more in common historically and theologically with “Western” Christianity than with one another. The various “Eastern” Churches do not normally refer to themselves as “Eastern,” with the exception of the Assyrian Church of the East and its offshoots.

The terms “Eastern” and “Western” in this regard originated with divisions in the Church mirroring the cultural divide between the Hellenistic east and Latinate west and the political divide between the weak Western and strong Eastern Roman empires. Because the most powerful Church in the East was what has become known as the Eastern Orthodox Church, the term “Orthodox” is often used in a similarly loose fashion as “Eastern”, although strictly speaking most Churches consider themselves part of an Orthodox and Catholic communion.

Families of churches

 

Countries by number of Orthodox Christians in 2010

  More than 100 million
  More than 20 million
  More than 10 million
  More than 5 million
  More than 1 million

Eastern Christians do not share the same religious traditions, but do share many cultural traditions. Christianity divided itself in the East during its early centuries both within and outside of the Roman Empire in disputes about Christology and fundamental theology, as well as national divisions (Roman, Persian, etc.). It would be many centuries later that Western Christianity fully split from these traditions as its own communion. Today there are four main branches or families of Eastern Christianity, each of which has distinct theology and dogma.

In many Eastern churches, some parish priests administer the sacrament of chrismation to infants after baptism, and priests are allowed to marry before ordination. While all the Eastern Catholic Churches recognize the authority of the Pope, some of them who having originally been part of the Orthodox Church or Oriental Orthodox Church closely follow the traditions of Orthodoxy or Oriental Orthodoxy, including the tradition of allowing married men to become priests.

The Eastern churches’ differences from Western Christianity have as much, if not more, to do with culture, language, and politics, as theology. For the non-Catholic Eastern churches, a definitive date for the commencement of schism cannot usually be given (see East-West Schism). The Church of the East declared independence from the churches of the Roman Empire at its general council in 424, which was before the Council of Ephesus in 431, and so had nothing to do with the theology declared at that Council. Oriental Orthodoxy separated after the Council of Chalcedon in 451.

Since the time of the historian Edward Gibbon, the split between the Church of Rome and the Orthodox Church has been conveniently dated to 1054,though the reality is more complex. This split is sometimes referred to as the Great Schism, but now more usually referred to as the East-West Schism. This final schism reflected a larger cultural and political division which had developed in Europe and southwest Asia during the Middle Ages and coincided with Western Europe’s re-emergence from the collapse of the Western Roman Empire.

Eastern Orthodox Church

 

Christ Pantocrator, detail of the Deesis mosaic in Hagia SophiaConstantinople (Istanbul) 12th century

The Orthodox Church is a Christian body whose adherents are largely based in the Middle East (particularly Syria and Iraq), Russia, Greece, Eastern Europe and The Caucasus (Armenia, Georgia, Ossetia etc), with a growing presence in the western world. Orthodox Christians accept the decisions of the First seven Ecumenical Councils.

Orthodox Christianity identifies itself as the original Christian church (see early centers of Christianity) founded by Christ and the Apostles, and traces its lineage back to the early church through the process of Apostolic Succession and unchanged theology and practice. Distinguishing characteristics of the Orthodox Church (shared with some of the Eastern Catholic Churches) include the Divine Liturgy, the Mysteries or Sacraments, and an emphasis on the preservation of Tradition, which it holds to be Apostolic in nature.

The Orthodox Church is organized into self-governing jurisdictions along geographical, national, ethnic, and/or linguistic lines. Orthodoxy is thus made up of 15 or 16 autocephalous bodies. Smaller churches are autonomous and each have a mother church that is autocephalous.

The Orthodox Church includes the following jurisdictions:

All Orthodox are united in doctrinal agreement with each other, though a few are not in communion at present, for non-doctrinal reasons. This is in contrast to the Roman Catholic Church and its various rites. Members of the latter are all in communion with each other, parts of a top-down hierarchy (see primus inter pares).

The majority of Catholics accept both the Filioque clause and, since 1950, the Assumption of Mary. This puts them in sharp contrast with the Orthodox. Yet some Catholics who are not in communion with the Roman Catholic Church side with the Orthodox here and reject these teachings, putting them in theological disagreement with the others.

It may also be noted that the Church of Rome was once in communion with the Orthodox Church, but the two were split after the East-West Schism and thus it is no longer in communion with the Orthodox Church.

It is estimated that there are approximately 240 million Orthodox Christians in the world.[1] Today, many adherents shun the term “Eastern” as denying the church’s universal character. They refer to Eastern Orthodoxy simply as the Orthodox Church.

Oriental Orthodox Churches

Oriental Orthodoxy refers to the churches of Eastern Christian tradition that keep the faith of the first three Ecumenical Councils of the undivided Church: the First Council of Nicaea (AD 325), the First Council of Constantinople (381) and the Council of Ephesus (431), while rejecting the dogmatic definitions of the Council of Chalcedon (451). Hence, these churches are also called Old Oriental Churches.

Oriental Orthodoxy developed in reaction to Chalcedon on the eastern limit of the Byzantine Empire and in Egypt and Syria and Mesopotamia. In those locations, there are also Eastern Orthodox Patriarchs, but the rivalry between the two has largely vanished in the centuries since the schism.

The following Oriental Orthodox churches are autocephalous and in full communion:

The Oriental Orthodox churches which are autocephalous but not in communion with other Oriental Orthodox churches are :

Read more: HERE    HERE

 

this pressed for your right to know: Where Do the World’s Wealthiest People Live? – Real Time Economics – WSJ


Of course, the U.S. has a lot of wealthy people because it’s a big country. But the analysis suggests that the U.S. is punching above its weight, even after accounting for population. Total wealth per adult increased by $340,340 in North America, or an increase of 10.2% from the prior year. Total wealth per adult grew by nearly $146,000 in Europe, an increase of 10.4%.

By contrast, wealth per adult grew just 2.3% in China and it fell 1.9% in Latin America and 3.1% in India.

via Where Do the World’s Wealthiest People Live? – Real Time Economics – WSJ.

today’s Holiday/celebration: Hispanic Heritage Month


Hispanic Heritage Month

Since 1989, National Hispanic Heritage Month has been celebrated in the US from September 15 until October 15. It is issued as a presidential proclamation each year. The activities that take place during the month, particularly in cities with large Hispanic populations, focus on how Latinos have made the US a richer and more interesting place to live. They include performances by Latino musical groups, lectures about Hispanic life, and special awards presentations to Latinos who have made significant achievements in business, education, or the arts. More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Julio Cortázar (1914) “French: a culture of inclusion”


 

Français : Plaque commémorative, 4 rue Martel,...

Français : Plaque commémorative, 4 rue Martel, Paris 10 e . « Ici vécut Julio Cortázar, 1914-1984, écrivain argentin naturalisé français, auteur de Marelle. » (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Julio Cortázar (1914)

Cortázar was an Argentinean novelist who gained recognition as one of the century’s major experimental writers. A permanent resident of France after 1951, his works reflect his interest in French Surrealism, psychoanalysis, photography, jazz, and revolutionary Latin American politics. His masterpiece, Rayuela—translated as Hopscotch—creates a world in which eroticism, humor, and play offer solace for life’s cruelty and despair. What is unique about the novel’s structure? More… Discuss

The Doors – L.A Woman Album (make music part o your life series)


LA Woman is the sixth studio album by the American rock band The Doors, released in April 1971. Was the last album recorded by singer Jim Morrison who died París.En three months in 2003, Rolling Stone placed it at number 362 on their list of the 500 greatest albums of all tiempos.Es an album almost exclusively of blues, a style which in previous work had not been more than an influence, although increasingly marked and already dominant in the previous “Morrison Hotel“.
00:00  The Changeling
04:21   Love Her Madly
07:43  Been Down So Long
12:23   Cars Hiss by My Window
16:36   LA Woman
24:28   L’America
29:08  Hyacinth House
32:20  Crawling King Snake
37:20  The WASP (Texas Radio and the Big Beat)
41:40  Riders On The Storm
48:53  Orange County Suite
54:38  (You Need Meat) Don’t Go No Further

make music part of your life series: George Gershwin – Cuban Overture


[youtube.com/watch?v=RBd1bmYB4t4]

George GershwinCuban Overture

Uploaded on Aug 9, 2010

Born the son of Russian-Jewish immigrants into the vibrant life of Manhattan, George Gershwin created much of the twentieth century’s musical highlights, with an endless stream of hit shows. His fascination with classical music, and his fusion of many varied musical forms like jazz, blues and ragtime, brought us the likes of Porgy and Bess and Rhapsody in Blue.

Cuban Overture (running time : 11:16)
Courtesy goes to Richard Hayman and his Symphony Orchestra.

Gershwin’s Cuban Overture, described aptly as a “Rhumba” , was written in 1932. It is a lively evocation of the spirit of Cuba, bringing together the two sides of composer’s abilities, a synthesis of art, jazz and Latin America.

SAINT OF THE DAY March 24: ST. ALDEMAR March 24


SAINT OF THE DAY

March 24 Saint of the Day

ST. ALDEMAR
March 24: Abbot and miracle worker, called “the Wise.” Born in … Read More

March
24
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TODAY’S HOLIDAY: FEAST OF ST. ANTHONY THE ABBOT


Feast of St. Anthony the Abbot

St. Anthony the Abbot was one of the earliest saints, and, if St. Athanasius‘s biography of him is correct, Anthony lived more than 100 years (251–356). He eventually came to be regarded as a healer of animals as well as of people. His feast day is celebrated in Mexico and other parts of Latin America by bringing household pets and livestock into the churchyard, where the local priest blesses them with holy water. All the animals are carefully groomed and often decorated with ribbons and fresh flowers. In some Latin American cities, the Blessing of the Animals takes place on a different day—often on Holy Saturday, the day before Easter.More…

 

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THE MBIRA


The Mbira

The mbira, or thumb piano, is an African musical instrument that dates to at least the 16th century. Originally brought to Latin America by African slaves, it is made of a hollow gourd or wooden resonator and has several attached metal or bamboo strips that vibrate when plucked by the player’s thumbs or fingers. Some cultures, such as the Shona people of Zimbabwe, use mbira music to communicate with ancestral spirits. What objects are often placed on the soundboard to create a buzzing sound? More… Discuss

CELEBRATORY GUNFIRE


Celebratory Gunfire

A common practice in places such as the Balkans, the Middle East, South Asia, Latin America, and some parts of the US, shooting a firearm into the air in celebration occurs most often on holidays such as New Year‘s, Christmas, and Eid. Falling bullets are responsible for damaged roofs and shattered windows. Worse, they can result in injury and even death. Why is the mortality rate among those struck by falling bullets much higher than the mortality rate normally associated with gunshot woundsMore… Discuss

 

This Day in the Yesteryear: INTERNATIONAL DAY OF THE DISAPPEARED OBSERVED BY UN FOR FIRST TIME (2011)


International Day of the Disappeared Observed by UN for First Time (2011)

The International Day of the Disappeared on August 30 is an annual commemoration day to draw attention to the fate of individuals imprisoned at places unknown to their relatives and without legal process. The impulse for the day came from the Latin American Federation of Associations for Relatives of Detained-Disappeared, a non-governmental organization founded in 1981 in Costa Rica. When did the United Nations adopt the Declaration on the Protection of All Persons from Enforced DisappearanceMore… Discuss

 

WikiLeaks in Latin America – Online Whistleblower’s Wide Impact in Region Where Assange Seeks Asylum


WikiLeaks in Latin America - Online Whistleblower’s Wide Impact in Region Where Assange Seeks Asylum

WikiLeaks in Latin America – Online Whistleblower’s Wide Impact in Region Where Assange Seeks Asylum (click to access report at Democracy Now)