Tag Archives: Leipzig

Wagner Concert in Leipzig 1988 DDR 3 – Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg (‘Wach Auf’ and Finale)


Wagner Concert in Leipzig 1988 DDR 3 – Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg (‘Wach Auf’ and Finale)

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Leonard Cohen – Take This Waltz [Official Music Video], great songs/interpretations


Leonard Cohen – Take This Waltz [Official Music Video]

 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 
 
 

Musical Jewels: Glenn Gould talks about J S Bach: make music part of your life series (i#make music part of your life series)


Glenn Gould talks about J S Bach

J. S. Bach, Sonata No. 1 in G minor, BWV 1001 – Ana Vidovich (“ANA VIDOVIC – GUITAR VIRTUOSO”, 2006): great compositions/performances


J. S. Bach, Sonata No. 1 in G minor, BWV 1001 – Ana Vidovich

Felix Mendelssohn: A Midsummer Night’s Dream Overture Op.21 by Masur, LGO (1997): great compositions/performances


Mendelssohn A Midsummer Night’s Dream Overture Op.21 by Masur, LGO (1997)

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Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy:

A Midsummer Night’s Dream Overture Op.21
(Gewandhausorchester Leipzig

Kurt Masur, Conductor)
****************************************             
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

At separate times, Felix Mendelssohn composed music for William Shakespeare‘s play, A Midsummer Night’s Dream. In 1826, near the start of his career, Mendelssohn wrote a concert overture (Op. 21). In 1842, only a few years before his death, he wrote incidental music (Op. 61) for a production of the play, into which he incorporated the existing Overture. The incidental music includes the world-famous Wedding March. The German title reads Ein Sommernachtstraum.

Overture

The Overture in E major, Op. 21, was written by Mendelssohn at 17 years and 6 months old (it was finished on 6 August 1826),[1] and George Grove called it “the greatest marvel of early maturity that the world has ever seen in music”.[2] It was written as a concert overture, not associated with any performance of the play. The Overture was written after Mendelssohn had read a German translation of the play in 1826. The translation was by August Wilhelm Schlegel, with help from Ludwig Tieck. There was a family connection as well: Schlegel’s brother Friedrich married Felix Mendelssohn’s aunt Dorothea.[3]

While a romantic piece in atmosphere, the Overture incorporates many classical elements, being cast in sonata form and shaped by regular phrasings and harmonic transitions. The piece is also noted for its striking instrumental effects, such as the emulation of scampering ‘fairy feet’ at the beginning and the braying of Bottom as an ass (effects which were influenced by the aesthetic ideas and suggestions of Mendelssohn’s friend at the time, Adolf Bernhard Marx). Heinrich Eduard Jacob, in his biography of the composer, said that Mendelssohn had scribbled the chords after hearing an evening breeze rustle the leaves in the garden of the family’s home.[3]

Following the first theme in the parallel relative minor (E minor) representing the dancing fairies, a transition (the royal music of the court of Athens) leads to a second theme, that of the lovers. A final group of themes, suggesting the craftsmen and hunting calls, closes the exposition. The fairies dominate most of the development section and ultimately have the final word in the coda, just as in Shakespeare’s play.

The Overture was premiered in Stettin (then in Prussia; now Szczecin, Poland) on 20 February 1827,[4] at a concert conducted by Carl Loewe. Mendelssohn had turned 18 just over two weeks earlier. He had to travel 80 miles through a raging snowstorm to get to the concert,[5] which was his first public appearance. Loewe and Mendelssohn also appeared as soloists in Mendelssohn’s Concerto in A-flat major for 2 pianos and orchestra, and Mendelssohn alone was the soloist for Carl Maria von Weber‘s Konzertstück in F minor. After the intermission, he joined the first violins for a performance of Beethoven‘s Ninth Symphony.

The first British performance of the Overture was conducted by Mendelssohn himself, on 24 June 1829, at the Argyll Rooms in London, at a concert in benefit of the victims of the floods in Silesia, and played by an orchestra that had been assembled by Mendelssohn’s friend Sir George Smart.[4]

Incidental music

Mendelssohn wrote the incidental music, Op. 61, for A Midsummer Night’s Dream in 1842, 16 years after he wrote the Overture. It was written to a commission from King Frederick William IV of Prussia. Mendelssohn was by now the music director of the King’s Academy of the Arts and of the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra.[6] A successful presentation of SophoclesAntigone on 28 October 1841 at the New Palace in Potsdam, with music by Mendelssohn (Op. 55) led to the King asking him for more such music, to plays he especially enjoyed. A Midsummer Night’s Dream was produced on 14 October 1843, also at Potsdam. The producer was Ludwig Tieck. This was followed by incidental music for Sophocles’ Oedipus (Potsdam, 1 November 1845; published posthumously as Op. 93) and Jean Racine‘s Athalie (Berlin, 1 December 1845; Op. 74).[1]

The A Midsummer Night’s Dream Overture, Op. 21, originally written as an independent piece 16 years earlier, was incorporated into the Op. 61 incidental music as its overture, and the first of its 14 numbers. There are also vocal sections and other purely instrumental movements, including the Scherzo, Nocturne and Wedding March. The vocal numbers include the song “Ye spotted snakes” and the melodramas “Over hill, over dale”, “The Spells”, “What hempen homespuns”, and “The Removal of the Spells”. The melodramas served to enhance Shakespeare’s text.

Mendelssohn – String Quartet No. 1, Op. 12: make music part of your life series


Mendelssohn – String Quartet No. 1, Op. 12

Felix Mendelssohn-Bartoldy

String Quartet No.1, Op.12 (1829)

1. Adagio non troppo – Allegro non tardante
2. Canzonetta – Allegretto (7:42)
3. Andante espressivo (11:48)
4. Molto allegro e vivace (15:23)

Melos Quartet

Editor:
Julius Rietz (1812–1877)

Publisher Info.:
Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdys Werke, Serie 6.
Leipzig: Breitkopf & Härtel, 1875. Plate M.B. 22.

Reprinted:
Mineola: Dover Publications

make music part of your life series: Felix Bartholdy Mendelssohn – 4 pieces for String Quartet Op. 81 – III. Capriccio


[youtube.com/watch?v=p0JwIUhGtVM]

Felix Bartholdy Mendelssohn – 4 pieces for String Quartet Op. 81 – III. Capriccio  (SHARON QUARTET)

great compositions/performances: F. Schubert – Symphony No. 4 “Tragic” in C minor, D. 417 (Harnoncourt)


[youtube.com/watch?v=CnoI-sYtCOU]

F. SchubertSymphony No. 4 “Tragic” in C minor, D. 417 Conductor – Nikolaus Harnoncourt
Wiener Philharmoniker
Musikvereinssaal Wien

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The symphony has four movements (a performance lasts around 30 minutes.)
  1. Adagio molto – Allegro vivace
  2. Andante in A flat major
  3. Menuetto. Allegro vivace – Trio in E flat major
  4. Allegro

The Symphony No. 4 in C minor, D. 417, commonly called the Tragic (German: Tragische), was composed by Franz Schubert in April 1816.[1] It was completed one year after the Third Symphony, when Schubert was 19 years old. However, the work was premiered only on November 19, 1849, in Leipzig, more than two decades after Schubert’s death.[citation needed]

The title Tragic is Schubert’s own. It was added to the autograph manuscript some time after the work was completed.[1] It is not known exactly why he added the title, but the work is one of only two symphonies (the Unfinished Symphony is the other) which Schubert wrote in a minor key.

The symphony is scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in B-flat, 2 bassoons, 4 horns in A-flat, C and E-flat, 2 trumpets in C and E-flat, timpani and strings.

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GREAT COMPOSITIONS/PERFORMANCES: Mendelssohn A Midsummer Night’s Dream Overture Op.21 by Masur, LGO (1997)


[youtube.com/watch?v=SUDvZaMl4RU&noredirect=1]

Mendelssohn A Midsummer Night’s Dream Overture Op.21 by Masur, LGO (1997)

Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy:
A Midsummer Night’s Dream Overture Op.21

Gewandhausorchester Leipzig
Kurt Masur, Conductor

Live at Gewandhaus, Leipzig

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Civitas Lipsiarum Early Music from Leipzig


[youtube.com/watch?v=UV7_qjc4Yj8]

Civitas Lipsiarum Early Music from Leipzig

1. Sethus Calvisius Freut euch und jubiliert, motet
Ein Tag in deinen Vorhöfen
2. Symphonia
Jacob Weckmann
3. Ein Tag in dein Vorhöfen ist besser …
Jacob Weckmann
4. Ich will lieber der Tür hüten …
Jacob Weckmann
5. Denn Gott der Herr is Sonn und Schild.
Jacob Weckmann
6. Herr Zebaoth …
Jacob Weckmann
7. Alleluja
Jacob Weckmann
8. Barmherzig und gnädig ist der Herr
Johann Schelle
9. Christ unser Herr zum Jordan kam, hymn for 4 voices (& continuo) (Cantional…)
Johann Hermann Schein
10. Welt ade, ich bin dein müde
Johann Rosenmüller
11. Siehe der Gerechte kömpt umb
Tobias Michael
12. O nomen Jesu, nomen dulce
Johann Rosenmüller
13. Paduana 17 zu fünf Stimmen
Werner Fabricius

Herr, strafe mich nicht in deinem Zorn
14. Sonata
Sebastian Knüpfer
15. Herr, strafe mich nicht …
Sebastian Knüpfer
16. Wird wohl ein Mensch …
Sebastian Knüpfer
17. Denn dein Pfeile stecken …
Sebastian Knüpfer
18.Es wird auf mich vom Himmel abgeschicket …
Sebastian Knüpfer
19. Ich kann es nicht …
Sebastian Knüpfer
20. Allein für dir ist alles mein Begehren …
Sebastian Knüpfer
21. Ich harre auf Gott
Sebastian Knüpfer
22. Drum wirst du mich …
Sebastian Knüpfer
23. Paduana Nr. 43 zu fünf Stimmen
Werner Fabricius
24. Proprium-Stücke zum Epiphaniasfest (from Thomaskirche Gradual, 14th cent.)
Anonymous, German
25. Ecce dilectus meus
Heinrich Isaac

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Great Compositions/Performances: “Das Märchen von der schönen Melusine”, Concert Overture in F Major, op 32 by Felix Mendelssohn Gewandhausorchester Leipzig Kurt Masur, conductor


Great Compositions/Performances: Kurt MasurDas Märchen von der schönen Melusine” Mendelssohn
“Das Märchen von der schönen Melusine”, Concert
Overture in F Major, op 32
by Felix Mendelssohn
Gewandhausorchester Leipzig
Kurt Masur, conductor

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Great Compositions/Performances: Choral from Cantata No.147 (Jesu bleibet meine Freunde) by Johann Sebastian Bach. Conducted by Nikolaus Harnoncourt.


[youtube.com/watch?v=3Mn1ibFdXDU]

Bach – BWV 147 – 7 – Jesus bleibet meine Freude

Choral from Cantata No.147 by Johann Sebastian Bach. Conducted by Nikolaus Harnoncourt.

High Quality: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Mn1ib…

Jesus bleibet meine Freude,
Meines Herzens Trost und Saft,
Jesus wehret allem Leide,
Er ist meines Lebens Kraft,
Meiner Augen Lust und Sonne,
Meiner Seele Schatz und Wonne;
Darum lass ich Jesum nicht
Aus dem Herzen und Gesicht.

1 – Herz und Mund und Tat und Leben http://youtube.com/watch?v=wraO_FOpFJ4
2 – Schäme dich, o Seele, nicht http://youtube.com/watch?v=QgLmLuRSDl8 
3 – Bereite dir, Jesu, noch itzo die Bahn http://youtube.com/watch?v=hIDRf-YlQVc
4 – Wohl mir, daß ich Jesum habe http://youtube.com/watch?v=3jFxeO63fj8
5 – Hilf, Jesu, hilf http://youtube.com/watch?v=Ae9trX3jKX4
6 – Ich will von Jesu Wundern singen http://youtube.com/watch?v=bKrsqh-H5YU

 

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Great compositions/Performances: Bach: Cantata, BWV 147, Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring


[youtube.com/watch?v=3jGbQfIXh44&feature=c4-overview&list=UU6sujip0vq_jTW69yQkKS2w]

Great compositions/Performances: Bach: Cantata, BWV 147, Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring is the most common English title of the 10th and last movement of the cantata Herz und Mund und Tat und Leben, BWV 147 (“Heart and Mouth and Deed and Life”), composed by Johann Sebastian Bach in 1716 and 1723. Written during his first year in Leipzig, Germany, this chorale movement is one of Bach’s most enduring works.

Jesu, joy of man’s desiring,

Holy wisdom, love most bright;

Drawn by Thee, our souls aspiring

Soar to uncreated light.

Word of God, our flesh that fashioned,

With the fire of life impassioned,

Striving still to truth unknown,

Soaring, dying round Thy throne.

Through the way where hope is guiding,

Hark, what peaceful music rings;

Where the flock, in Thee confiding,

Drink of joy from deathless springs.

Theirs is beauty’s fairest pleasure;

Theirs is wisdom’s holiest treasure.

Thou dost ever lead Thine own

In the love of joys unknown.

Enjoy, It’s all good!

 

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Encore: Compositions/Performances: Mendelssohn A Midsummer Night’s Dream Overture Op.21 by Masur, LGO (1997)


Great Compositions/Performances:  Mendelssohn A Midsummer Night’s Dream Overture Op.21 by Masur, LGO (1997)
Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy:
A Midsummer Night’s Dream Overture Op.21
Gewandhausorchester Leipzig
Kurt Masur, Conductor
Live at Gewandhaus, Leipzig

visit:  http://www.shakespeare-navigators.com/dream/quotesdream.html
for quotes, like the one bellow,  from Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream

So quick bright things come to confusion.—Lysander again speaks to Hermia of the fragility of happiness. (“Confusion” means darkness and destruction.)

Related articles

 

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Great compositions/Performances: Bach: Cantata, BWV 147, Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring



Culture Studies: Classical Music: Bach
(A series of well-known classical music pieces one should known about.)

Bach, Johann Sebastian (1685-1750)
Style/Period: Late German Baroque (w/eclectic German, French & Italian elements); German, Leipzig-based from 1723

Bach Cantata, BWV 147, Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring

 

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J. S. Bach – Motet “Singet Dem Herrn Ein Neues Lied” BWV 225 (1/3)



1. Singet Dem Herrn Ein Neues Lied
Occasion unknown.
Ps. 149:1-3; Johann Gramann, verse 3 of “Nun lob, mein Seel, den Herren,” 1530 (Wackernagel, I, #455) and interpolated aria by an unknown poet; Ps. 150:6.
Composed in Leipzig (1726-27)
Text:
[Ps. 149:1-3] (Chorus I, Chorus II)
“Sing ye the Lord a new refrain; the assembly of saints should be telling his praises. Israel joyful be in him who hath made him. Let Zion’s children rejoice in him who is their mighty king; let them be praising his name’s honor in dances; with timbrels and with psalt’ries unto him be playing”.

Hilliard Ensamble

Bach-Motets playlist: http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list…

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Kurt Masur, conducts the Gewandhausorchester Leipzig in Mendelssohn’s ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream Overture Op.21’ (1997)


Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy:
A Midsummer Night’s Dream Overture Op.21

Gewandhausorchester Leipzig
Kurt Masur, Conductor
Live at Gewandhaus, Leipzig
Reupload from Lyricholic’s Channel

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Felix Mendelssohn – Six Anthems for eight voices a capella opus 79 – New Year



Maulbronn Chamber Choir
The night shines as the day
Conductor: Jürgen Budday

A concert recording from the church of the
UNESCO World Heritage Site Maulbronn Monastery.
Released & created by Andreas Otto Grimminger & Josef-Stefan Kindler
in cooperation with Jürgen Budday.
Juli 2010.

F. Mendelssohn: Sechs Sprüche zum Kirchenjahr.
In durchweg opulenten 8stimmigen Sätzen durchmisst Mendelssohn die Feste des Kirchenjahres vom Advent bis zu Himmelfahrt. Dabei reicht die klangliche Palette je nach Charakter des jeweiligen Festes vom dumpfen Adagio bis hin zum strahlenden, jubelnden Allegro. Inhaltlich repräsentiert insbesondere der Text der Passionszeit das Thema des Konzertes: Die “Übeltaten”, das Elend und die Sünde stehen für die negativen Seiten des Lebens, die durch Christus in der Herrlichkeit Gottes aufgehoben werden.

 

Today’s Birthday: JOHANN ECK (1486)


Johann Eck (1486)

Eck, a German Catholic theologian, was initially friendly with Martin Luther but did not hesitate to condemn Luther’s 95 Theses—which criticized papal policy—as heretical. Known for his dialectic skill, he publicly confronted Luther in 1519, and then went to Rome and returned with a papal bull condemning Luther. From then on, he was a leader in the struggle against the reforming party in Germany. How did the students of Leipzig, the site of Eck’s confrontation with Luther, react to the bull? More… Discuss

 

J. S. Bach : Cantata — BWV 68 “Also hat Gott die Welt geliebt” (Karl Richter)



Johann Sebastian Bach (1685 – 1750)
“Also hat Gott die Welt geliebt”
(God so loved the world)
BWV 68
Event:
Cantata for Whit Monday [2nd Day of Pentecost]
Readings: 
Epistle: Acts 10: 42-48; Gospel: John 3: 16-21
Composed:
Leipzig, 1725
1st performance: May 21, 1725 – Leipzig

Text:
Christiane Mariane von Ziegler (Mvts. 2-4); Salomo Liscow (Mvt. 1); John 3: 18 (Mvt. 5)
Scoring:
Soloists: Soprano, Bass; 4-part Chorus
Orchestra: 3 trumpets, 3 trombones, 2 oboes, taille, horn, 2 violins, violoncello piccolo, viola, continuo
Mvt. 1: Chorus — Chorale (00:00)
Mvt. 2: Aria (05:31)
Mvt. 3: Recitative (09:41)
Mvt. 4: Aria (10:39)
Mvt. 5: Chorus (15:08)
Soprano: Edith Mathis
Bass: Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau

Oboe (I/II): Manfred Clement and Robert Eliscú
Englischhorn: Andreas Scwinn
Horn: Christoph Brandt
Violin: Ingo Sinnhoffer
Violincello: Fritz Kiskalt

Münchener Bach-Chor / Münchener Bach-Orchester
Conductor – Karl Richter

May 1974; Jan 1975, at Herkules-Saal, München, Germany.

 

J.S. Bach – Brandenburg Concerto No.4 in sol-major BWV 1049


1. Allegro   00:00 
2. Andante  07:17
3. Presto  12:42

Johann Sebastian Bach (Eisenach, Thuringia, March 21. / March 31, 1685 – Leipzig, July 28, 1750) was an organist, harpsichordist and composer of Baroque music German member of a family of musicians most extraordinary of history, with more than 35 famous composers and many outstanding performers. 
His reputation as an organist and harpsichordist was legendary, famed throughout Europe. Apart from the organ and harpsichord, also played the violin and the viola da gamba as well as being the first great improviser renowned music. 
His prolific work is considered the pinnacle of Baroque music. He was distinguished for his intellectual depth, technical perfection and artistic beauty, and also for the synthesis of various international styles of his time and of the past and unparalleled extension. Bach is considered the last great master of the art of counterpoint, which is the source of inspiration and influence to later composers and musicians from Mozart through Schoenberg, until today.

 

J.S. Bach – Brandenburg Concerto No.5 in re-major BWV 1050


Johann Sebastian Bach ( Eisenach , Thuringia , March 21 . / March 31, 1685 – Leipzig , July 28, 1750 ) was an organist , harpsichordist and composer of Baroque music German member of a family of musicians most extraordinary of history, with more than 35 famous composers and many outstanding performers .
His reputation as an organist and harpsichordist was legendary , famed throughout Europe. Apart from the organ and harpsichord , also played the violin and the viola da gamba as well as being the first great improviser renowned music .
His prolific work is considered the pinnacle of Baroque music . He was distinguished for his intellectual depth , technical perfection and artistic beauty, and also for the synthesis of various international styles of his time and of the past and unparalleled extension . Bach is considered the last great master of the art of counterpoint, which is the source of inspiration and influence to later composers and musicians from Mozart through Schoenberg , until today.