Tag Archives: Lent

today’s holiday: Finnish Sliding Festival (2015)


Finnish Sliding Festival (2015)

Patterned after the traditional event in Finland that celebrates Shrove Tuesday before the beginning of Lent, the Finnish Sliding Festival, or Laskiainen, has been held in White, Minnesota, every winter for more than 50 years. It features two large ice slides, which are constructed at the edge of Loon Lake. People bring their sleds or toboggans for an exciting ride down the slide onto the frozen lake. Other activities at the weekend event include log-sawing contests, Finnish music and dance performances, and traditional Finnish foods such as oven pancakes and pea soup. More… Discuss

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Debussy Complete Preludes (Book 1 and 2)


Debussy Complete Preludes (Book 1 and 2)

Vatican Radio: Fifth Sermon for Lent: St Gregory the Great on understanding scripture


Fifth Sermon for Lent: St Gregory the Great on understanding scripture


(Vatican Radio) Below please find the complete text of the fifth sermon for Lent delievered by Fr. Raniero Cantalamessa, OFMCAP, Preacher to the Papal Household delivered Friday April 11, 2014:

In our attempt to place ourselves under the teaching of the Fathers to give a new impetus and depth to our faith, we cannot omit a reflection on their way of reading the Word of God. It will be Pope St. Gregory the Great who will guide us to the “spiritual understanding” of the Scriptures and a renewed love for them. 
The same thing happened to Scripture in the modern world that happened to the person of Jesus. The quest for the exclusively historical and literal sense of the Bible, based on the same presuppositions that dominated during the last two centuries, led to results similar to those in the quest for a historical Jesus opposed to the Christ of faith. Jesus was reduced to being an extraordinary man, a great religious reformer, but nothing more. >>>>>>>>>>More

[Text from page http://en.radiovaticana.va/news/2014/04/11/fifth_sermon_for_lent:_st_gregory_the_great_on_understanding_scripture/en1-789841
of the Vatican Radio website ]
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ST. MARY OF EGYPT – Feastday: April 2


Image of St. Mary of Egypt
Facts

Feastday: April 2

Patron of Chastity (warfare against the flesh; deliverance from carnal passions); Demons (deliverance from); Fever; Skin diseases; Temptations of the flesh

Birth: 344

Death: 421

In Cyril of Scythopolis‘ life of St. Cyryacus, he tells of a woman named Mary found by Cyryacus and his companions living as a hermitess in the Jordanian desert. She told him she had been a famous singer and actress who had sinned and was doing penance in the desert. When they returned, she was dead. Around the story was built an elaborate legend that had tremendous popularity during the Middle Agesaccording to which she was an Egyptian who went to Alexandria when she was twelve and lived as an actress and courtesan for seventeen years. She was brought to the realization of her evil life before an icon of the Blessed Virgin, and at Mary’s direction, went to the desert east of Palestine, where she lived as a hermitess for forty-seven years, not seeing a single human being and beset by all kinds of temptations, which were mitigated by her prayers to the Blessed Virgin. She was discovered about 430 by a holy man named Zosimus, who was impressed by her spiritual knowledge and wisdom. He saw her the following Lent, but when he returned, he found her dead and buried her. When he returned to his monastery near the Jordan, he told the brethren what had happened and the story spread. Her feast day is April 2.

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ARTICLE: LENT


LENT
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Its institutional purpose is heightened in the annual commemoration of Holy Week, marking the death, burial and resurrection of Jesus, which recalls the tradition and events of the New Testament beginning on Friday of Sorrows, further climaxing on Jesus’crucifixion on Good Friday, which ultimately culminates in the joyful celebration on Easter Sunday of the Resurrection of Jesus Christ. During Lent, many of the faithful commit to fasting or giving up certain types of luxuries as a form of penitence. Many Christians also add a Lenten spiritual discipline, such as reading a daily devotional, to draw themselves near to God.[6] TheStations of the Cross, a devotional commemoration of Christ’s carrying the Cross and of his execution, are often observed. Many Roman Catholic and some Protestant churches remove flowers from their altars, while crucifixes, religious statues, and other elaborate religious symbols are often veiled in violet fabrics in solemn observance of the event. Throughout Christendom, some adherents mark the season with the traditional abstention from the consumption of meat, most notably among Roman Catholics.[7]

Lent is traditionally described as lasting for forty days, in commemoration of the forty days which, according to the Gospels ofMatthewMark and Luke, Jesus spent fasting in the desert before the beginning of his public ministry, where he endured temptation by the Devil.[8][9] However, different Christian denominations calculate the forty days of Lent differently. Historically, the season of Lent lasts from Ash Wednesday to Holy Saturday and includes the Paschal Triduum.[10][11] This duration has been maintained by most Western Christian denominations, including the Anglican Church,[12] Lutheran Church,[13] Methodist Church,[14] and Western Rite Orthodox Church.[15] However, after the liturgical abbreviations of the Second Vatican Council in the Roman Catholic Church, Lent, in that denomination alone, is now taken to end on Maundy Thursday rather than Easter Eve, and hence lasts 38 days excluding Sundays, or 44 days in total.[10]


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