Tag Archives: Leoš Janáček

great compositions/performances: Antonín Dvořák – Humoresque No. 7, Op. 101


Antonín DvořákHumoresque No. 7, Op. 101

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Antonín Dvořák – Symphony No. 9 in E Minor “From the New World” By Von Karajan: great compositions/performances


Antonín Dvořák – Symphony No. 9 in E Minor “From the New World” By Von Karajan

Movements:

1. Adagio, 4/8 — Allegro molto, 2/4, E minor
2. Largo, common time, D-flat major, then later C-sharp minor
3. Scherzo: Molto vivace — Poco sostenuto, 3/4, E minor
4. Allegro con fuoco, common time, E minor, ends in E major
Sinfonia n.º 9 (Dvořák)
A Sinfonia Nº. 9 em Mi menor Op. 95 Sinfonia do Novo Mundo
Symfonie č. 9 (Dvořák), Symfonie č.9, e-moll, op. 95 Antonína Dvořáka

Instrumentation
This symphony is scored for an orchestra of the following:
2 flutes (one doubling piccolo)
2 oboes (one doubling on English horn)
2 clarinets in A and B♭ (B♭ in movement 2)
2 bassoons
4 horns in E, C and F
2 trumpets in E, C and E♭
2 tenor trombones
bass trombone
tuba (second movement only)
timpani
triangle (third movement only)
cymbals (fourth movement only)
strings
Symphony No. 9 (Dvořák)

Dvorak – Piano Concerto in G minor, Op.33-Rudolf Firkusny: make music part of your life series



From   wittekjmusic  wittekjmusic

Dvorak – Piano Concerto in G minor, Op.33-Rudolf Firkusny:

Form

The concerto has three movements:

  1. Allegro agitato
  2. Andante sostenuto in D major
  3. Allegro con fuoco: G minor →G major

Rudolf Firkušný was a Czech-born 11 February 1912 — 19 July 1994) , American classical pianist.Born in Moravian Napajedla, Firkušný started his musical studies with the composers Leoš Janáček and Josef Suk, and the pianist Vilém Kurz. Later he studied with Alfred Cortot and Artur Schnabel. He began performing on the continent of Europe in the 1920s, and made his debuts in London in 1933 and New York in 1938. He escaped the Nazis[citation needed] in 1939, fled to Paris, later settled in New York and became a U.S. citizen. Firkušný had a broad repertoire and performed with skill the works of Mozart, Beethoven, Chopin and Brahms as well as Debussy and Mussorgsky. However, he became known especially for his performances of the Czech composers Bedřich Smetana, Antonín Dvořák, Leoš Janáček, and Bohuslav Martinů (who wrote a number of works for him), as well as recordings of the complete piano works of Janáček. Continue reading

Antonín Dvořák – Water Goblin, Op. 107: MAKE MUSIC PART OF YOUR LIFE SERIES


Antonín Dvořák – Water Goblin, Op. 107
FROM:

make music part of your life series: Leoš Janáček: Lachian Dances (1889/90)


[youtube.com/watch?v=wOJdsMcmpDw]

Leoš Janáček: Lachian Dances (1889/90)

Leoš Janáček (1854 – 1928), perhaps more than any other composer of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, including Gustav Mahler and Sergey Rahmaninov, represents a puzzling case in point as for the cultural and spiritual seismic shift that took place between the 1870s/’80s and the 1920s. He comes from a world already shaken by the French Revolution and all subsequent revolutions up to 1848, yet still sufficiently alive so to remember the old ways: fairy tales and folk legends, style, distinction, Monarchy, Catholicism. This last quarter of the 19th century was at the same time the pontificate of Pope Leo XIII, who indeed fought like a lion in order to ward off the meanwhile 360° onslaught, open and hidden, against the old order and the Catholic Church. However, Janáček, like so many of his generation, was drawn into those false promises of a “new era”, whether pan-Slavic, pantheist, or plain modernist. Still he kept the memories of the old world of his childhood days. His musical oeuvre, especially his folkloristic works, so painfully as well as articulately shows what had been lost – lost forever …

Slovak Radio Symphony Orchestra, Bratislava
Ondrej Lenárd, conductor

Recorded at Bratislava on January 29/30, 1990

Taken from the CD: “Janáček: Sinfonietta / Lachian Dances / Taras Bulba”, released by NAXOS. Order that CD here: http://www.amazon.com/Jan%C3%A1cek-Si…
or from your local CD-shop.
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See also the connected blog: http://thecontemplativeobserver.wordp….

make music part of your life series: Janacek – Idyll for Strings


[youtube.com/watch?v=1vKyJJEhl_4]

Janacek – Idyll for Strings

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MAKE MUSIC PART OF YOUR LIFE SERIES: Antonín Dvořák – Czech Suite, Op. 39


[youtube.com/watch?v=mYXlM0Mcqms]

Antonín DvořákCzech Suite, Op. 39

Janácek Philharmonic Orchestra, Theodore Kuchar

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Antonín Dvořák – Water Goblin, Op. 107



Janácek Philharmonic Orchestra, Theodore Kuchar

Antonín Dvořák – In Nature’s Realm Overture, Op. 91



Janácek Philharmonic Orchestra, Theodore Kuchar

 

Leoš Janáček: Lachian Dances (1889/90)


Leoš Janáček (1854 – 1928), perhaps more than any other composer of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, including Gustav Mahler and Sergey Rahmaninov, represents a puzzling case in point as for the cultural and spiritual seismic shift that took place between the 1870s/’80s and the 1920s. He comes from a world already shaken by the French Revolution and all subsequent revolutions up to 1848, yet still sufficiently alive so to remember the old ways: fairy tales and folk legends, style, distinction, Monarchy, Catholicism. This last quarter of the 19th century was at the same time the pontificate of Pope Leo XIII, who indeed fought like a lion in order to ward off the meanwhile 360° onslaught, open and hidden, against the old order and the Catholic Church. However, Janáček, like so many of his generation, was drawn into those false promises of a “new era”, whether pan-Slavic, pantheist, or plain modernist. Still he kept the memories of the old world of his childhood days. His musical oeuvre, especially his folkloristic works, so painfully as well as articulately shows what had been lost – lost forever …