Tag Archives: List of Superfund sites in the United States

On the 30th anniversary of Bhopal: No one talks much about toxic Superfund sites anymore. But 49 million Americans live close to one.|National Geografic


National Geografic- Waateland - About Toxic Superfund Sites

National Geografic- Waateland – About Toxic Superfund Sites

No one talks much about toxic Superfund sites anymore. But 49 million Americans live close to one.

By Paul Voosen
Photographs by Fritz Hoffmann

For most of his adult life Jun Apostol has lived, willingly, in the shadow of a mountain of waste. An accountant who’s now retired, he planted his family in 1978 in a modest new house in Montebello, an industrial cum bedroom community just east of Los Angeles. Behind the house, in neighboring Monterey Park, sat an active landfill—but don’t worry, the developer said. Soon it would close and become a park or maybe even a golf course.

The greens never came. It turned out that the landfill, a former gravel pit that had welcomed so much ordinary trash it had filled to ground level and then kept on rising, had also accepted some 300 million gallons of liquid industrial waste—and it hadn’t been selective. Was your waste laced with arsenic, 1,4-dioxane, or mercury? No problem. The nodding pump jacks nearby, left from the oil boom, wouldn’t care. Some of the waste might have come from drilling those oil wells.

Los Angeles had buried the hazardous waste, but it was far from gone. A few years after Apostol’s development was built, his neighbors began complaining of nausea. Gas had intruded into six homes. Property values plummeted. In 1986 the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency marched in and listed the landfill as a Superfund site, part of its new program to contain the nation’s hazardous waste crisis.

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Libby_Montana New Danger Found In Asbestos-Plagued Town_via_HUFFPOST


Libby_Montana New Danger Found In Asbestos-Plagued Town_via_HUFFPOST

Libby_Montana New Danger Found In Asbestos-Plagued Town_via_HUFFPOST (click on picture to read the story)

LIBBY, Mont. — For a decade, the people of Libby have longed for the day when they will be rid of the asbestos that turned their town into the deadliest Superfund site in America.

Now they are being forced to live through the agony all over again, thanks to two giant piles of bark and wood chips on the edge of town.

An Associated Press investigation found that the federal government has known for at least three years that the wood piles were contaminated with an unknown level of asbestos, even as Libby residents hauled truckload after truckload of the material away from the site and placed it in yards, in city parks, outside schools and at the local cemetery. The Environmental Protection Agency did not stop the removal of the material until the AP began investigating in early March.

Regulators still do not know what effect the material could have on public health, but EPA documents obtained by the AP showed that the agency found potentially deadly asbestos fibers in four of 20 samples taken from the piles of scrap wood in 2007. The sprawling piles came from a now-defunct timber mill that took thousands of trees from a forest tainted with asbestos from a nearby mine.
(Source: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/07/05/libby-montana-asbestos-wood-piles_n_890222.html)

Democracy Now: Asbestos in Libby Montana, and elsewhere


Democracy Now_asbestos_Libby-Montana

Democracy Now_asbestos_Libby-Montana (click on the picture to watch the video and read the story)

Montana: Regulators Knew Contaminated Bark Was Being Sold in Asbestos-Tainted Town

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In Montana, the Associated Press has revealed federal regulators knew potentially contaminated bark and wood chips were being sold from a Superfund site in the asbestos-tainted town of Libby, Montana, for three years before they stopped the practice. The contaminated wood chips were placed in yards, city parks, outside schools and at the local cemetery. Asbestos from a W.R. Grace mine in Libby has killed an estimated 400 people and sickened at least 1,750 people.