Tag Archives: Louisiana

People and places: Emeril Lagasse


Emeril Lagasse

Lagasse is a celebrity chef and restaurateur. He gained fame when his restaurant, “Emeril’s,” in New Orleans, Louisiana, was named Esquire magazine‘s “Restaurant of the Year” in 1990. He went on to become the host of the popular TV shows The Essence of Emeril and Emeril Live. Lagasse delivered his cajun-and-creole-based recipes with catchphrases like “BAM!” and “Kick it up a notch!” He has also starred in his own sitcom and voiced a character in what Disney film? More… Discuss

today’s photo: The Cattle Kingdom (image: National Archives)



The Cattle Kingdom
In 1866, when the transcontinental railroad reached Abilene, Kansas, Chicago livestock buyer J.G. McCoy saw the possibilities of linking the unwanted herds of Texas longhorns with the meat-packing centers of Chicago. McCoy built a series of holding pens in Abilene and convinced south Texas ranchers to drive the cattle north along the Chisholm Trail to the railhead. In 1867, McCoy shipped 35,000 cattle to Chicago to end up on American dinner tables, and by 1871 this number had grown to 600,000. Abilene may have been the first cow town, but disease and rowdy cowboys shifted the cow capital first to Wichita, then to Dodge City, Kansas. The profits to be made were immense, with a $5 steer in Texas bringing up to $45 in Kansas. In fact, the profitability of the cattle kingdom was one of the factors contributing to its demise in 1886. Greedy ranchers dangerously overstocked the grasslands with cattle by the mid-1880s. Then, on January 1, 1886, a great blizzard buried the eastern and southern plains, killing 50 to 85 percent of the herds. The cattle industry survived, but in a very different form. The freewheeling cowboy of American legend became a ranch hand. Although the cattle kingdom lasted only a single generation, the romanticized cowboy remains an enduring symbol of Western America.

Image: National Archives

– See more at: http://www.historynet.com/picture-of-the-day#sthash.M98Q7l3E.dpuf

today’s birthday: John Kennedy Toole (1937)


Today’s Birthday

John Kennedy Toole (1937)

Toole was an American novelist from New Orleans, Louisiana, best known for his novel A Confederacy of Dunces. His mental health began to deteriorate after his manuscript, into which he had poured so much of himself, was rejected by a publisher, and he committed suicide in 1969. Years after his death, Toole’s mother brought the manuscript to novelist Walker Percy, who ushered the book into print. In 1981, Toole was posthumously awarded the Pulitzer Prize. What is Toole’s only other novel? More… Discuss

this pressed…So that you know: Senate Keystone “Yea” Votes Took In Six Times More Oil & Gas Money Than Opponents | OpenSecrets Blog


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Senate Keystone “Yea” Votes Took In Six Times More Oil & Gas Money Than Opponents

by Sarah Bryner on November 19, 2014

Senate Democrats successfully blocked a bill Tuesday that would have approved construction of the Keystone XL pipeline. The controversial measure fell one vote shy of overcoming a filibuster, with 59 senators supporting it and 41 opposing. The vote followed the bill’s approval in the House by a much wider margin, with 252 lawmakers voting to advance the pipeline.

The vote largely fell along party lines. All Senate Republicans supported construction of the pipeline but they were joined by 14 Democrats, including three of the four Democrat incumbents who lost their re-election bids earlier this month. For Sen. Mary Landrieu (D-La.), the bill’s main sponsor, the vote was considered an important test of her effectiveness in advance of a Dec. 6 runoff that will determine whether she keeps her seat. In the House, 31 Democrats crossed the aisle to side with the Republican majority.

via Senate Keystone “Yea” Votes Took In Six Times More Oil & Gas Money Than Opponents | OpenSecrets Blog.

this pressed: For Oil and Gas Companies, Rigging Seems to Involve Wages, Too – ProPublica


The seal of the United States Department of Labor

The seal of the United States Department of Labor (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

For Oil and Gas Companies, Rigging Seems to Involve Wages, Too – ProPublica.

Memento: Kate Chopin


Memento: Kate Chopin

 
 

Kate Chopin in 1894

Kate Chopin in 1894 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Born Katherine O’Flaherty
February 8, 1850
St. Louis, Missouri, United States
Died August 22, 1904 (aged 54)
St. Louis, Missouri, United States
Occupation Novelist, short story writer
Genres realistic fiction
Notable work(s) The Awakening

Kate Chopin, born Katherine O’Flaherty (February 8, 1850 — August 22, 1904), was an American author of short stories and novels. She is now considered by some to have been a forerunner of the feminist authors of the 20th century.

From 1892 to 1895, she wrote short stories for both children and adults which were published in such magazines as Atlantic Monthly, Vogue, The Century Magazine, and The Youth’s Companion. Her major works were two short story collections, Bayou Folk (1894) and A Night in Acadie (1897). Her important short stories included “Desiree’s Baby,” a tale of miscegenation in antebellum Louisiana (published in 1893),[1]The Story of an Hour” (1894),[2] and “The Storm“(1898).[1] “The Storm” is a sequel to “The ‘Cadian Ball,” which appeared in her first collection of short stories, Bayou Folk.[1] Chopin also wrote two novels: At Fault (1890) and The Awakening (1899), which are set in New Orleans and Grand Isle, respectively. The people in her stories are usually inhabitants of Louisiana. Many of her works are set in Natchitoches in north central Louisiana.

Within a decade of her death, Chopin was widely recognized as one of the leading writers of her time. In 1915, Fred Lewis Pattee[3] wrote, “some of [Chopin’s] work is equal to the best that has been produced in France or even in America. [She displayed] what may be described as a native aptitude for narration amounting almost to genius.”

quotation: Kate Chopin – “There are some people who leave impressions not so lasting as the imprint of an oar upon the water.”


There are some people who leave impressions not so lasting as the imprint of an oar upon the water.

Kate Chopin (1851-1904) Discuss

quotation: Kate Chopin


I trust it will not be giving away professional secrets to say that many readers would be surprised, perhaps shocked, at the questions which some newspaper editors will put to a defenseless woman under the guise of flattery.

Kate Chopin (1851-1904) Discuss

THIS DAY IN HISTORY: Bonnie and Clyde Ambushed and Killed (1934)


Bonnie and Clyde Ambushed and Killed (1934)

Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow were notorious robbers who went on a 21-month crime spree in the central US from 1932 to 1934. They captivated Americans during the “public enemy era” and continue to do so today through films and songs. Betrayed by a friend, Bonnie and Clyde were tracked, ambushed, and killed on a desolate stretch of Louisiana highway by a posse of officers using armor-piercing rounds. Though remembered primarily as bank robbers, Bonnie and Clyde actually preferred to rob what? More… Discuss

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: Plessy v. Ferguson: “Separate but Equal” Ruled Constitutional (1896)


Plessy v. Ferguson: “Separate but Equal” Ruled Constitutional (1896)

In this case, the US Supreme Court upheld a Louisiana statute mandating racially segregated railroad cars, ruling that the equal protection clause of the 14th Amendment dealt with political and not social equality. This provided constitutional sanction for the adoption of the Jim Crow laws. Justice Henry Billings Brown wrote the majority opinion, stating that “separate but equal” laws did not imply one race’s inferiority to another. What prompted Homer Plessy to serve as the case’s plaintiff? More… Discuss

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This Day in the Yesteryear: OIL RIG ACCIDENTALLY DRAINS LAKE PEIGNEUR (1980)


Oil Rig Accidentally Drains Lake Peigneur (1980)

When Leonce Viator, Jr., set out in his boat for a day of fishing on Louisiana‘s Lake Peigneur, he never imagined he would end up fighting for his life. But that is exactly what happened after an oil rig on the lake’s surface accidentally bored through the roof of a salt mine beneath it. Like a bathtub whose plug has been pulled, the lake began draining into the mine, creating a whirlpool that sucked in not just water but barges, trees, and acres of surrounding land. What happened to Viator?More… Discuss

 

Hurricane Isaac_ Louisiana Today on the 7th Anniversary of Katrina) (from MS – NBS News)


Hurrice Isaac_ Luisiana

Hurricane  Isaac_ Louisiana  (click to access report)

Warning about Brown Widow Spiders In SoCal-Orange County – via KTLA


Warning about Brown Widow Spiders In SoCal-Orange County

Warning about Brown Widow Spiders In SoCal-Orange County

The spider Latrodectus geometricus, commonly known as the brown widow, grey widow, or geometric button spider, is one of the widow spiders in the genus Latrodectus. As such, it is a “cousin” to the more famous Latrodectus mactans. The brown widow is found in parts of the southeastern, southern and southwestern United States (including Florida, Alabama, California, Oklahoma, Nevada, Louisiana, Mississippi, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, Tennessee, Arizona, New Mexico and Texas); as well as in parts of Australia, Afghanistan, South Africa and Cyprus.[citation needed] The origin of this species is uncertain, as specimens were independently discovered in both Africa and the Americas. They are usually found around buildings in tropical areas.
(
Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latrodectus_geometricus)